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Which clippings match 'Visual Literacy' keyword pg.1 of 16
05 JUNE 2015

Emoticons as computer-mediated non-verbal communication

"The term 'emoticons'—short for 'emotion icons'—refers to graphic signs, such as the smiley face, that often accompany computer-mediated textual communication. They are most often characterized as iconic indicators of emotion, conveyed through a communication channel that is parallel to the linguistic one. In this article, it is argued that this conception of emoticons fails to account for some of their important uses. We present a brief outline of speech act theory and use it to provide a complementary account of emoticons, according to which they also function as indicators of illocutionary force. More broadly, we identify and illustrate three ways in which emoticons function: 1) as emotion indicators, mapped directly onto facial expression; 2) as indicators of non-emotional meanings, mapped conventionally onto facial expressions, and 3) as illocutionary force indicators that do not map conventionally onto a facial expression. In concluding, we draw parallels between emoticons and utterance-final punctuation marks, and show how our discussion of emoticons bears upon the broader question of the bounds between linguistic and non-linguistic communication."

(Eli Dresner and Susan C. Herring, 2010)

Dresner, E., & Herring, S. C. (2010). "Functions of the non-verbal in CMC: Emoticons and illocutionary force". Communication Theory, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 249-268.

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TAGS

2010computer-mediated communication (CMC) • computer-mediated textual communication • discourse analysis • Eli Dresner • emoticons • emotion icon • emotion indicators • facial expressionsgraphic communication • graphic signs • hieroglyphs • iconic indicators of emotion • illocutionary act • illocutionary force • illocutionary force indicator • illustration to visually communicate informationimages replace text • linguistic communication • linguistics • non-emotional meanings • non-linguistic communication • non-verbal communicationpictogrampictorial languagepicture language • smiley face • social informatics • speech act theory • Susan Herring • textual computer-mediated communication (CMC) • utterance-final punctuation marks • visual languagevisual literacyvisual representation graphically

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 JUNE 2014

Bernard Pras: the perceptual organisation of found objects

"Bernard Pras is a French painter, photographer and sculptor. He has spent more than 20 years perfecting his craft. One of his more recent body of work feature sculptures of pop icons made entirely out of found objects which, when viewed from a specific angle, transforms into an easily recognizable image. His subjects include Albert Einstein,, Jack Nicholson, Bob Marley, Mao Zedong, Uncle Sam, and Che Guevarra. His inspirations include Salvador Dali, Edvard Munch, Japanese woodcut artist Hiroshige, and Guiseppe Arcimboldo."

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 NOVEMBER 2013

The Kuleshov Effect

"Technique which demonstrates the inherent power of montage as a primary tool in the manipulation of the viewer's perception. According to Kuleshov, cinema consists of fragments and it is their combination rather than their content that is essential in evoking and triggering different emotions. His original experiment consists of using the same shot of the character's face, frozen in a neutral emotion while editing it next to different objects he appears to be glancing at: a girl in a coffin, a bowl of soup, and a woman. The audience interpreted the three situations as expressions of sadness, hunger and lust."

(Laura Minca)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 MARCH 2013

Jesse Desjardins' You Suck At PowerPoint!

Uploaded via SlideShare as Adobe PDF

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 DECEMBER 2012

The Art & Media Course at Tama Art University in Japan

"Art & Media Course in Information Design Department of Tama Art University manages various kinds of art forms by utilizing digital technologies and bio medias, such like interactive installations, audio & visual performances, software arts, bio arts, digital animations, and future cinemas. Through the background of recent dynamic changes of relationship between technology and human society, we aim to bring up new types of multi–skilled creators who can transcend the traditional boundaries of fine arts, science, engineering, mathematics and philosophy.The Course has established unique creative environment configured by four individual laboratories which has their own research themes."

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TAGS

applied media arts • art and culture • Art and Media Course in Information Design Department • art forms • art history • art media • art theorybio artbio data • bio media art • CGIcommunication designcommunication design education • communications networks • community arts • craft and materials • creative cinema • cultural and social relations • Department of Information Design • design coursedesign managementdesign theory • digital animation • digital architecturedigital technologiesdrawing • Faculty of Fine Arts • fine art • future cinema • future phenomenology • human interfaces • IDDlab • information and society • information design • information networks • information without form • integrated media arts • interaction designinteractive artinterdisciplinary workingJapankinetic artmedia arts • media design history • media design theory • media information literacy • multi-skilled creatorsnew craftsperforming arts • social network theory • software artsound art • Tama Art University • technology and human societytime-based artvideo artvideo mediavisual literacyvisual media • write objects

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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