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Which clippings match 'Hungarian' keyword pg.1 of 1
14 SEPTEMBER 2014

A personal project to introduce a daughter to the Hungarian alphabet

"This book is the result of a very personal project aiming to introduce a little girl to the 44 letters of the Hungarian alphabet.

Illustrations were carefully designed so that every subject that appears in this book is something she's currently very much interested in. So in one way this book is not just a tool but also a diary documenting a four–year–old little girl's world in the summer of 2013 on an island in the Mediterranean Sea.

On the other hand though, hopefully it will also serve as an equally exciting source of knowledge and inspiration for anyone interested in language or design.

Ez a könyv egy személyes ajándék, aminek elsődleges célja, hogy megismertessen egy kislányt a magyar ábécé 44 betűjével.

Lgyekeztem min den itt előforduló illusztráció úgy elkészíteni, hogy azok az ő pillanatnyi érdeklődési körét legjobban tükrözzék. Így bizonyos szempontból ez a könyv nem csak egy eszköz, hanem napló is, ami, dokumentája egy négy éves kislány világbát 2013 nyarán, egy földközi – tengeri szigeten.

Másrészről viszont, remélhetőleg legalább enynyire izgalmas forráa lesz mindenki más számára is, akit egyszerűen csak érdekel a nyelv vagy a képek világa."

(Anna Kövecses, 2013)

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TAGS

2013 • abeces konyv • alphabetalphabet book • Anna Kovecses • Blurb (self-publishing) • book illustrationbright colourschildrens bookchildrens book illustrationcolour fielddiary • early education • editorial designflat colourflat spaceFutura (typeface)Hungarian • Hungarian alphabet • Hungarian language • illustration • magyar • modernist aestheticsnostalgic tribute • preschool education • Reykjaviksans-serif typefaceself-publishing • stimulating imagination • teaching language • vibrant colourwomen illustratorsyoung girl

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 NOVEMBER 2008

Sátántangó: surprise non-linearity

"Also interesting from the perspective of temporality, along with Tarr's staggeringly long takes, is the film's narrative structure, which is what I call 'surprise non–linearity.' As the film begins we watch events that are occurring in a forward, linear temporality (with minor ellipsis' occurring in between certain shots). At a certain point we experience a sense of deja vu which shakes this temporal foundation: a scene which we have already scene repeats but from a different spatial and narrational point of view. In this case the moment occurs, as noted in the beginning, from the position of the doctor's desk. In the film's second scene we see a man who has slept with a married woman sneak out of the house when the husband returns home. The camera later cuts outside to an image of the adulterer hiding behind the corner of a house out of view of the husband, who is in the middle background of the shot looking out into the expanse. Forty or so minutes into the film we see this same mise en scene of the man hiding from the husband but from the doctor's point of view, as he writes the event down in his notebook. This stuttering temporality occurs on several occasions. Offscreen contributor Randolph Jordan tells me that when he saw Béla Tarr present this film in Vancouver the director used the tango to explain the film's temporal structure: two steps forward, one step back. One can also see the temporal structure as an echo of the film's metaphorical use of the spider. Several of the film's intertitles make reference to the spider, and the spider makes a physical appearance at the end of the long pub dance scene. In a long lateral tracking shot of the drunken revelers a spider can be briefly scene in the foreground of a shot spinning a web between two glasses. The voice–over tells us that the spider will be spinning its web around the objects, and around the people in the pub, echoing of course the messiah's trap. The spiral–like shape of the spider web acts as an apt parallel to the film's narrative temporality. This type of 'surprise non–linearity' has become quite common in recent years. A list of films which use such a structure, to varying degrees and ends, includes Korean director Hong Sang–Joo's The Power of Kangwon Province/Kangwondo Eui Him (1998) and Virgin Stripped Bare by her Naked Bachelors (2000), Mystery Train (jim Jarmusch, 1989), Pulp Fiction (Quentin Tarantino, 1995), Heaven (Scott Reynold, 1998), Before the Rain (Milcho Manchevski, 1994), and A Moment of Innocence (Mohsen Makhmalbaf, 1996)."

Totaro, 2002)

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TAGS

black and whitechronologycinemacommunity • deja vu • designfarmfilmfilm directorfilmmakerHungarianHungary • interlink • Jim Jarmusch • Krasznahorkai • lingering • long takes • meditative pace • Messiah • metaphor • Milcho Manchevski • mise-en-scene • Mohsen Makhmalbaf • narrativenon-linearQuentin Tarantino • Satantango • Scott Reynoldsspiderstructure • surprise non-linearity • tango • Tarr • temporal

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 JANUARY 2004

Things Spoken: a catalogue of Her belongings

"Most people collect objects during their lives. These can be gifts, souvenirs, momentos, personal artifacts, found things, etc. Their significance for their 'collectors' are usually contextual and personal.

This CD–ROM presents a selection of about 50 objects that I have collected, put together in such a way that the viewer can make an interactive exploration of both their singularities and their possible (inter)relationships. Each object has been digitized on a flat–bed scanner, whose consequent transformation of the original object is a form of aesthetic reconstitution characteristic for 'multimedia'. Embedded in a machinal darkness, the objects reveal themselves insubstantially, idiosynchratically in the reflected red, green and blue light of the scanning process.

The viewer can sort these objects by various criteria such as size, weight, colour, function, or such as in the case of gifts, the gender of the persons who gave them to me. In this way that 'feverish' method by which digital archives can be reorganised according to any criteria is here applied in a manner that is as gratuitously personal as the objects themselves.

Each object is accompanied by my personal narrative that led me to keep these often trivial things and by the account of friends. The third layer of interactivity comes from within these spoken narratives. Specific words are hypertextually linked to any reoccurences oaf those words elsewhere. In this way the viewer can instantly make links between objects and their associated stories. These chance conjunctions in the narratives amplify potential relationships that let the viewer discover further layers of congruency and signification within this very personal of objects."

(Media Art Net)

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