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12 FEBRUARY 2010

'Gaydar' for iPhone

"A new iPhone app called Grindr seems to be becoming very popular. It's free, and locates you using the GPS, then shows you the 25 nearest users. You can browse their profiles (pretty basic details, picture and short note), chat to them, send pics and your location (link to iPhone Maps app)"

(zerocrop2000, 03/05/2009 )

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TAGS

belongingbisexualchatcommunicationcommunityconvergencecultural signalsdevicegay • Gaydar • genderGPS • Grindr • information in contextinnovationintegrateinteractioniPhonelesbian • LGB • LGBTlocationlocation-basedmembershipmobileparticipationproximitysexualitysocial interactionsocial networksubculturetechnology • visibility • visual identity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 FEBRUARY 2010

Skout brings location-based dating to the iPhone

"There are some who view any kind of location–based social networking as creepy. But there are others who see it as the key ingredient to move online social networks into the real world. And one type of network in particular could lead the way: Dating sites. At least, that's what Skout is hoping for with its new iPhone application.

Set to be unveiled this week at the iDate conference in Miami, Skout claims to be the first online dating site with a native iPhone app. That's not entirely true – there are others like Dating DNA – but Skout could prove more interesting due to its emphasis on location and compatibility with other mobile devices.

If you've used any other location–based social networking apps on the iPhone like Loopt or Brightkite, Skout is similar, except that its sole emphasis is on helping you find people to date. After loading the app, you can see others around you who are also running it. If you spot someone who you think you might be compatible with, you can click on their picture to find out more about them, see a stream of their recent activity on the site (like the Facebook News Feed or Wall), look at pictures and comment on posted items, and even chat with them."

(MG Siegler, 21 January 2009, VentureBeat)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 MARCH 2009

Could Social Networking Bolster the 30-Second Spot?

"For years, it has been assumed that home Internet usage would cannibalize live television viewing, but there's something interesting happening between social networking and live TV. Could it be that what Pete Blackshaw termed "telecommunities" –– people simultaneously watching live television programs and chatting in real time with an online network of like–minded fans –– will gain scale and give consumers a reason to stick with live viewing?"
(John R. Burbank, CEO, Nielsen Online)

TAGS

chatconvergenceIMmedia convergencesocial networkingsocial software • telecommunities • televisionTVviewing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 NOVEMBER 2008

Dynamics of Plurilingual Interaction in Chat Rooms

"If we conceive of 'chats' as virtual conversations with a variable number of interlocutors with more or less opaque and changeable identities and whose almost total contextual opacity facilitates ambiguity and doubt in the production and reception of exchanges, we can conclude that many non–verbal contextual clues at a vocal level (paralinguistic, intonation, etc.) as well as a visual level (gestures, expressions, etc.) are absent in chats due to the textual nature of the conversations carried out within them, which in turn means a significant reduction in the possible interpretations of utterances. (Yus, 2001: 86, our translation) However, the absence of these characteristics is not perceived as a real barrier to communication, but rather as a challenge, since chat participants find ways to create contextual conditions in order to clarify the meanings they want to transmit. These conditions reveal an effort to optimise the only means they can access – the computer – with all its possibilities: capitalisation, punctuation, special characters and so on. With these resources, smiles are produced, cries and laughs are visualised (as if they wanted to become sounds and be heard!) and gazes and gestures are mimed. In fact, we can observe multiple ways of alternative meaning–making, which are signs of participants' creativity and interactional involvement on three levels: (1) the use of technology, (2) the use of communicative language(s) and (3) the way technology and language(s) merge into a visual plurilingual patchwork."
(Maria Helena Ara´ujo e S´a and S´ılvia Melo)

0965–8416/07/01 007–14 2007 M. H. Ara´ ujo e S´a & S.Melo
LANGUAGE AWARENESS Vol. 16, No. 1, 2007

TAGS

chatcollaborationcommunicationconversationICTinformationinteractive mediainterpretation • involvement • meaning makingparticipatory learningpatchwork • plurilingual interaction • social interactionvirtual

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 FEBRUARY 2004

MUD: Multi-User Dungeon

"MUD /muhd/ /n./ [acronym, Multi–User Dungeon; alt. Multi–User Dimension] 1. A class of virtual reality experiments accessible via the Internet. These are real–time chat forums with structure; they have multiple 'locations' like an adventure game, and may include combat, traps, puzzles, magic, a simple economic system, and the capability for characters to build more structure onto the database that represents the existing world. 2. /vi./ To play a MUD. The acronym MUD is often lowercased and/or verbed; thus, one may speak of `going mudding', etc."
(utopia.mudservices.com)

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TAGS

authorshipchatIFinteractive fictionMOOMUD • multi-user dungeon • scriptibletext adventurestext-basedtext-onlyvirtual reality
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