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Which clippings match 'Immateriality' keyword pg.1 of 2
04 NOVEMBER 2015

Light projection works by American artist James Turrell

"For over half a century, the American artist James Turrell has worked directly with light and space to create artworks that engage viewers with the limits and wonder of human perception. ...

Turrell often cites the Parable of Plato's Cave to introduce the notion that we are living in a reality of our own creation, subject to our human sensory limitations as well as contextual and cultural norms. This is evident in Turrell's over eighty Skyspaces, chambers with an aperture in the ceiling open to the sky. The simple act of witnessing the sky from within a Turrell Skyspace, notably at dawn and dusk, reveals how we internally create the colors we see and thus, our perceived reality. ...

Turrell's medium is pure light. He says, 'My work has no object, no image and no focus. With no object, no image and no focus, what are you looking at? You are looking at you looking. What is important to me is to create an experience of wordless thought.'"

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aesthetic experienceallegory of the cavechamber • childhood fascination • colour and lightcolour fieldcolour light • colour projection • design formalismflat colourformalist design aestheticsgeometric primitive • high-intensity projector • human sensory limitations • immaterialityimmersive experienceimmersive works • interior and exterior spaces • James Turrelllarge scale worklightlight and spacelight artlight projectionlight works • no focus • no image • no object • non-representationalNorth American artistop art • open sky spaces • perceptual psychology • physical presence of lightpresence • projection pieces • projection works • pure light • sensory form • sky • skyspaces • visual abstraction • wordless thought

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 SEPTEMBER 2015

Design for Action: designing the immaterial artefact

"Throughout most of history, design was a process applied to physical objects. Raymond Loewy designed trains. Frank Lloyd Wright designed houses. Charles Eames designed furniture. Coco Chanel designed haute couture. Paul Rand designed logos. David Kelley designed products, including (most famously) the mouse for the Apple computer.

But as it became clear that smart, effective design was behind the success of many commercial goods, companies began employing it in more and more contexts. High-tech firms that hired designers to work on hardware (to, say, come up with the shape and layout of a smartphone) began asking them to create the look and feel of user-interface software. Then designers were asked to help improve user experiences. Soon firms were treating corporate strategy making as an exercise in design. Today design is even applied to helping multiple stakeholders and organizations work better as a system.

This is the classic path of intellectual progress. Each design process is more complicated and sophisticated than the one before it. Each was enabled by learning from the preceding stage. Designers could easily turn their minds to graphical user interfaces for software because they had experience designing the hardware on which the applications would run. Having crafted better experiences for computer users, designers could readily take on nondigital experiences, like patients' hospital visits. And once they learned how to redesign the user experience in a single organization, they were more prepared to tackle the holistic experience in a system of organizations."

(Tim Brown and Roger Martin, 2015, Harvard Business Review)

A version of this article appeared in the September 2015 issue (pp.56–64) of Harvard Business Review.

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Bill BuxtonCharles EamesCoco Chanelcomplex systems • David Kelley • design history • design intervention • design processdesign thinking • design-oriented approach • design-oriented thinkingdesigned artefactethnographic design approachFrank Lloyd Wright • genuinely innovative strategies • graphical user interfaceHarvard Business ReviewHerbert Simon • holistic user experience • IDEOimmateriality • intervention design • iPoditerative prototyping • iterative rapid-cycle prototyping • iTunes Store • Jeff Hawkins • look and feellow-fidelity prototype • low-resolution prototype • nondigital experiences • PalmPilot • Paul Randpersonal digital assistantphysical objectsrapid prototyping • Raymond Loewy • redesignRichard Buchananrole of the designerservice designuser experienceuser experience designuser feedbackuser interface designwicked problems

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 MAY 2015

Six years: the dematerialization of the art object from 1966 to 1972

"Lippard was a primary critic and theorist of Conceptual art; this book, however, provides not commentary but, instead, primary documentation. It takes the form of an annotated, thematic timeline: the chapters list books (including exhibition catalogs) published each year, followed by articles, statements, activities, and works arranged by month. Photographs illustrate selected works. The annotations are, for the most part, as documentary as possible (transcripts, excerpts of artists' statements, etc.). Lippard's editorial hand is most visible in her inclusions and exclusions; less so in her only occasional textual insertions. As such, the book performs as Lippard had envisioned: 'to expose the chaotic network of ideas in the air, in America and abroad, between 1966 and 1971' (5)."

Lucy Lippard (1973). "Six years: the dematerialization of the art object from 1966 to 1972; a cross-reference book of information on some esthetic boundaries". New York: Praeger.

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1973 • Adrian Piper • Agnes Denes • Alighiero Boetti • Allan Kaprow • Allen Ruppersberg • annotationsart objectArt-Language • arte povera • Athena Tacha Spear • Barry Flanagan • Barry Le Va • Bas Jan Ader • Bernar Venet • Bruce McLean • Bruce Nauman • Carl Andre • Catherine Morris • chaotic network of ideas • Charles Harrison • Christine Kozlov • chronology • Claes Oldenburg • conceptual artcontemporary art • Dan Graham • Daniel Buren • David Askevold • dematerialisation of the art object • Dennis Adrian • Dennis Oppenheim • digital art production • Donald Burgy • Douglas Huebler • earth art • Edward Ruscha • Eldritch Priest • Eleanor Antin • ephemeral art • Franz Erhard Walther • Franz Walther • Frederick Barthelme • Gerald Ferguson • Gerry Schum • Gilbert and George • Guerrilla Art Action Group • Hanne Darboven • Hans Haacke • Ian Burn • Ian Wilson • idea art • immateriality • information art • Jack Burnham • James Lee Byars • Jan Dibbets • John Baldessari • John Latham • Joseph BeuysJoseph Kosuth • Keith Arnatt • Keith Sonnier • La Monte Young • land art • Lawrence Weiner • Lee Lozano • Lucy Lippard • material concerns • materiality of artefacts • Mel Bochner • Mel Ramsden • Michael Asher • Michael Heizer • Michael Snow • Michelangelo Pistoletto • minimal art • N.E. Thing Co. • object art • On Kawara • performance art • Peter Downsbrough • Peter Hutchinson • post-conceptual • post-conceptual art • post-conceptualism • postconceptual • postconceptualism • provocative book • Rafael Ferrer • Richard Artschwager • Richard Long • Richard Serra • Robert Barry • Robert Morris • Robert Ryman • Robert SmithsonSeth SiegelaubSigmar PolkeSol LeWitt • Stanley Brouwn • Stephen Kaltenbach • Tony Smith • Victor Burgin • video art movements • Vincent Bonin • Vito Acconci • Walter de Maria • William Wegman • William Wiley • Willoughby Sharp • Wolf Vostell • Yoko Ono

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 SEPTEMBER 2014

MoMA: Geometry of Motion 1920s/1970s

Geometry of Motion 1920s/1970s, March 19–July 28, 2008, The Yoshiko and Akio Morita Media Gallery, second floor, The Museum of Modern Art.

"This exhibition considers the transformation of the art object from static image to light projection within two distinct artistic lineages: the unconventional optical techniques and social analyses of the 1920s Neue Optik, or 'New Vision,' generation of artists, among them László Moholy–Nagy, Hans Richter, and Marcel Duchamp; and the situational aesthetics advanced by Gordon Matta–Clark, Robert Smithson, and Anthony McCall in the 1970s. Drawing attention to the conditions and complexities of perception–both within the framework of institutional display and in other surroundings–these artists have redefined the social potential of visual agency."

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1920s1970safterimage • Anthony McCall • art object • artistic lineage • durationEl Lissitzkyexhibitionexperimental cinema • fluid light projection • geometric abstraction • Gordon Matta-Clark • Hans Richter • Hollis Frampton • immaterialityintangible creationsJames Turrell • Klaus Biesenbach • Laszlo Moholy-Nagylight and space • light and space movement • light artlight projectionMarcel Duchamp • Maria Nordman • materialisationmotion artsmovementmovement-image • moving through space • Museum of Modern Art • Neue Optik (New Vision) • non-narrative • objecthood • objecthood and space • optical techniques • Paul Sharits • peripatetic • Richard Serra • Robert Irving (artist) • Robert Irwin • Robert Smithson • Roxana Marcoci • solid light films • static image • structural film • VernissageTV (VTV) • Viking Eggeling

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 MARCH 2011

Pina Bausch: dance, dance otherwise we are lost

"There are deep noises of gallops. The brown earth covering the floor reveals hundreds of tracks of wild animals in stampede. But instead, it is a set of dancers what appears on scene. Their presence is heavily felt through their turbulent footprints. The Rite of Spring is one of Pina Bausch's most celebrated choreographic pieces, included in the homage documentary PINA that Wim Wenders has just presented. A movie about the sign that her teachings on performative space left before her death in 2009: the Dance Theatre genre.

In her choreographies, earth is heavy. Flying dust materializes air. The void weighs. Water drops densify the emptiness. Living bodies become inert corpses. A closed–eyed dancer lets her mass fall down until the trust on her partner saves her from a mortal knock. Hands and feet become detachable prosthesis. The lightness of matter clashes over the presence of the ephemeral. Optical illusions...

In Choreographed Environments, Eva Pérez de Vega points out that 'considering immaterial effects in the production of a material practice, is not at all about ignoring the material per se. It refers more to the conception of a material production. It is about thinking how to make immaterial notions material; ultimately it is about creating material effects. [...] Architecture no longer consists of making building and Dance no longer consists of making dances. The hope is that as dancers continue to explore new territories as managers of space, architects too can conceive of space as managers of movement' (Eva Pérez de Vega, 2007, p.7).

For the movie, many pieces were performed again in unusual urban settings, such as inside and underneath Wuppertal's retrofuturistic sky–train, or inside other recent architectural iconic references (easy to guess!). Pina Bausch pioneered a strong performative approach to architecture and Wenders has made her pupils revive its immateriality in cult buildings for posterity: a clear effort to transmit Pina's philosophy of movement constructing space. Bravo!"

(via Daniel Fernández Pascual, Deconcrete, 16 February 2011)

1,2). Wim Wenders (2011). 'Pina', Germany.
3). Eva Pérez de Vega (2007). 'Choreographed Environments. A Performative Approach to Architecture', New York.

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20092011architecture • choreographed environments • choreographer • choreographyconstructing spacedancedance theatredancerdocumentaryephemera • Eva Perez de Vega • figures in spacehomage • homo ludens • immateriality • invisible cities • making building • making dances • managers of space • material effectsmaterial practicematerial productionmovement • new territories • performative approach • performative space • philosophy of movement • Pina Bausch • pioneeringposterityprosthesisretro-futuristic • Rite of Spring • sky-train • spacetableau vivant • unusual urban settings • urbanism • Wim Wenders • Wuppertal Schwebebahn

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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