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04 MAY 2015

Beyond Bloomsbury: Designs of the Omega Workshops 1913-19

"Established in 1913 by the painter and influential art critic Roger Fry, the Omega Workshops were an experimental design collective, whose members included Vanessa Bell, Duncan Grant and other artists of the Bloomsbury Group.

Well ahead of their time, the Omega Workshops brought the experimental language of avant-garde art to domestic design in Edwardian Britain. They were a laboratory of design ideas, creating a range of objects for the home, from rugs and linens to ceramics, furniture and clothing – all boldly coloured with dynamic abstract patterns. No artist was allowed to sign their work, and everything produced by the Workshops bore only the Greek letter Ω (Omega)."

(The Courtauld Institute of Art)

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TAGS

1913 • 1919 • Alvaro Guevara • art movement • avant-garde art movement • Bloomsbury Group • bold new designs • British designceramicsclothing design • Cuthbert Hamilton • decorative artsdesign collectivedesign history • design of domestic products • Duncan Grant • Edward McKnight Kauffer • Edward Morgan ForsterEdward Wadsworth • Edward Wolfe • Frederick Etchells • furniture designGeorge Bernard Shaw • Gertrude Stein • Henri Gaudier-Brzeska • home furnishingsinterior design • Israel Zangwill • Jesse Etchells • Lady Ian Hamilton • Lady Maud Cunard • Lady Ottoline Morrell • linen design • linocutlithography • Mikhail Larionov • mosaicnew approaches • Nina Hamnett • Omega artists • Omega Workshops • painted furniture • painted murals • painted silks and linens • Pamela Diamand • Roger Fry • rug • Somerset House • stained glasstablewaretextile design • The Courtauld Institute of Art • upholstery • Vanessa Bell • vibrant abstract design • Virginia WoolfWilliam Butler Yeats • Winifred Gill • woodblock prints • woven wools • Wyndham Lewis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 OCTOBER 2014

The Ulm School: designing the system rather than the object

"The Ulm School of Design was founded in 1953 by Inge Aicher–Scholl, Otl Aicher and Max Bill, with the main task of incorporate design into industry and to shape our material culture. In the post–war years, the process was marked by a crisis of values and resources, and this fact drove the Ulm School to re–think the meaning of creating forms in the contemporary world and to democratize the access to design. The exhibition explores the concept of 'system', related with a set of rationally components capable of generating an object, and also the systematic approach of the school, which included for the first time, the integration of science and art.

The importance of the Ulm School in the history of design comes from the strict methodology they imposed on project development. Focusing on an inter–disciplinary work and objective design analysis, it rejected design as an artistic activity and spread through industry to all walks of life. The school was recognized worldwide for its approach of focusing on the design of the system rather than the object."

(Ethel Baraona Pohl, 13 February 2012, Domus Magazine)

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TAGS

1953 • 1972 Munich Olympics • access to design • Bilbao metro • Braun KM2 Multiwerk • communication analysis • communication problems • communication systems • construction systems • contemporary world • Design Hub Barcelona • design methodologydesign of the system rather than the objectDieter Rams • domestic products • Domus (magazine) • elementary objects • flexible products • furniture systems • Hans Gugelot • Hans Roericht • Herbert Lindinger • Inge Aicher-Scholl • integration of science and art • interchangeable elements • interdisciplinary working • Konrad Wachsmann • Lufthansa • material cultureMax Billmechanisation • methodological analysis • new approach • Nick Roericht • Norman Foster • objective design analysis • Otl Aicherpost-war eraprefabricationproject developmentsemiotics • simple systems • systematic approach • systems in electronics • tablewareUlm School of DesignWilhelm Wagenfeld

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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