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Which clippings match 'Scientists' keyword pg.1 of 2
14 AUGUST 2015

Everybody's Gone to the Rapture

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2015deserted places • deserted village • disappearance • English village • epidemic • Everybodys Gone to the Rapture (2015) • first-person adventure • first-person gamesfirst-person point of viewgate • infection • life formslight pulses • mysterious disappearance • mysterious outbreakobservatoryopen world • outbreak • Playstation 4post-apocalyptic scenarioPS4 • quarantine area • rapture • SCE Santa Monica Studio • scientists • Shropshire • Sony Computer Entertainment • Sony Santa Monica • spontaneous human combustion • story-based experience • story-based game • The Chinese Room • tumour • unknown life form • video gamevillage • voiceover • Yaughton

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 JANUARY 2013

The Value of Culture: Two Cultures

"Melvyn Bragg considers the 150–year history of the Two Cultures debate. In 1959 the novelist C.P. Snow delivered a lecture in Cambridge suggesting that intellectual life had become divided into two separate cultures: the arts and the humanities. The lecture is still celebrated for the furore it provoked – but Snow was returning to a battleground almost a century old. Melvyn Bragg visits the old Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge, scene of many of modern science's greatest triumphs, to put the Two Cultures debate in its historical context – and Paul Nurse, President of the Royal Society, reveals the influence the Two Cultures debate had on his development as a scientist."

(Melvyn Bragg, 2013)

"The Value of Culture: Two Cultures", Radio broadcast, Episode 3 of 5, Duration: 42 minutes, First broadcast: Wednesday 02 January 2013, Presenter/Melvyn Bragg, Producer/Thomas Morris for the BBC Radio 4, UK.

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1959 • all matters which most concern us • American education • American schools • artistic intellectuals • arts and humanitiesarts education • British education • C P Snow • Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge • Charles Percy Snow • civilisationClassicalclassicscommerce • cultural agenda • cultural high ground • cultureCulture and Anarchydisciplinary protectionism • editorial control • education system • elites • experimental teachingF R Leavis • free thought • German education • German schools • GreekH G Wellshabitshigh culture • illiteracy of scientists • intellectual life • John Tyndall • knowledgeLatin • literary intellectuals • manufacturingmaterialismMatthew ArnoldMelvyn Braggmodern sciencemodern society • Paul Nurse • quality of education • Rede Lecture • reliable official knowledge • Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts Manufactures and Commerce • RSA • schoolingsciencesciences and humanitiesscientific age • scientific culture • scientific education • scientific naturalism • scientific revolution • scientific teaching • scientists • Second Law of Thermodynamics • shared languagesocial class • speaking the same language • stock notions • study of perfection • technological culture • technology • the best which has been thought and said in the world • the classics • The Value of Culture (radio) • Thomas Huxley • traditional culturetwin pillarstwo cultures • Two Cultures debate • two separate cultures

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 NOVEMBER 2012

Videolectures: science video lectures open access repository

"VideoLectures.NET is an award–winning free and open access educational video lectures repository. The lectures are given by distinguished scholars and scientists at the most important and prominent events like conferences, summer schools, workshops and science promotional events from many fields of Science. The portal is aimed at promoting science, exchanging ideas and fostering knowledge sharing by providing high quality didactic contents not only to the scientific community but also to the general public. All lectures, accompanying documents, information and links are systematically selected and classified through the editorial process taking into account also users' comments."

(Videolectures.net)

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conferences • distinguished scholars • editorial process • educational video lectures repository • exchanging ideas • free materials • high quality didactic content • Internet portal • Jozef Stefan Institute • knowledge sharinglearning resourceopen accessOpen Educational Resources (OER) • promoting science • sciencescience and technologyscience education • science promotional events • scientific communityscientific insightsscientific knowledgescientific understandingscientists • summer schools • systematically selected and classified • video lecturesvideo repository • Videolectures.net • workshops

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 MAY 2012

2010 IMPACT!: the 5th Dimensional Camera

"'With their evocative multidimensional camera, the designers have attempted to embody Hugh Everett's many–worlds theory in an object that adds to the cinematic tradition of The Matrix (1999), Lost (2004–10), Fringe (2008–ongoing), and Source Code (2011), to name just a few.

With researchers working to harness the the peculiar workings of our subatomic world, we, as designers, were given an opportunity to explore the implications of one of its more concrete and immediate applications: quantum computing.

Working with EPSRC, NESTA, the RCA, and a group of scientists from the Quantum Information Processing Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration (QIPIRC), the 5th Dimensional Camera was produced for the 2010 IMPACT! exhibition as a metaphorical representation of quantum computation – a fictional device capable of capturing glimpses of parallel universes."

(Superflux Ltd.)

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2010 • 2010 IMPACT! • 5th dimension • 5th Dimensional Camera • blending physics • cameradesignersEPSRC • exploring implications • fictional devices • Fringe (television) • futures studies • futurologyHugh EverettIndia • Lost (television) • Many Worlds Interpretation • Many Worlds theory • metaphormetaphorical representationmultiple dimensionsNESTAparallel universe • parallel universes • product design • QIPIRC • quantum computation • quantum computing • Quantum Information Processing Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration • quantum mechanicsRCAresearchersscientistsSource Code (2011)speculative designspeculative researchspeculative science • subatomic world • Superflux (consultancy) • tangible prototypeThe Matrix (1999)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 SEPTEMBER 2011

Citizen science: predicting protein structures with a multiplayer online game

"People exert large amounts of problem–solving effort playing computer games. Simple image– and text–recognition tasks have been successfully 'crowd–sourced' through games, but it is not clear if more complex scientific problems can be solved with human–directed computing. Protein structure prediction is one such problem: locating the biologically relevant native conformation of a protein is a formidable computational challenge given the very large size of the search space. Here we describe Foldit, a multiplayer online game that engages non–scientists in solving hard prediction problems. Foldit players interact with protein structures using direct manipulation tools and user–friendly versions of algorithms from the Rosetta structure prediction methodology, while they compete and collaborate to optimize the computed energy. We show that top–ranked Foldit players excel at solving challenging structure refinement problems in which substantial backbone rearrangements are necessary to achieve the burial of hydrophobic residues. Players working collaboratively develop a rich assortment of new strategies and algorithms; unlike computational approaches, they explore not only the conformational space but also the space of possible search strategies. The integration of human visual problem–solving and strategy development capabilities with traditional computational algorithms through interactive multiplayer games is a powerful new approach to solving computationally–limited scientific problems."

(Seth Cooper, Firas Khatib, Adrien Treuille, Janos Barbero, Jeehyung Lee, Michael Beenen, Andrew Leaver–Fay, David Baker, Zoran Popović & Foldit players)

Nature 466, 756–760 (05 August 2010) doi:10.1038/nature09304 Received 22 January 2010 Accepted 30 June 2010

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algorithm • biochemistry • biomedicalcitizen sciencecollaboration • computational approaches • computational challenge • computer games • computing science • crowdsourcingdiscovery through designDNA • DNA sequence • Foldit • gamesimage recognitioninsight through designinteractive gamesmulti-player • multi-player online game • Nature (journal) • non-scientists • online gameplaying • predication • problem-solving • protein structure prediction • protein structures • scientific problems • scientists • structural biology • text recognitiontheory buildingvisual problem-solvingvisual representation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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