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20 AUGUST 2014

Musical sense-making and the concept of affordance: an ecosemiotic and experiential approach

"Is music something 'out there', a kind of structure or artefact, that can be dealt with in a static way? Or does it rely on processes which call forth interactions with the sounds? Should we conceive of music users besides the music, and think about music as something which is perceived, conceptualised and enacted upon in order to be meaningful? Is music an ontological category, or a sounding phenomenon that calls forth epistemic interactions with the sounds? And can music be considered as a sonic environment and the music user as an organism that generates music knowledge as a tool for adaptation to the sonic world?

These questions revolve around the ecological concept of coping with the (sonic) world (Reybrouck, 2001a, 2005a, b). Musical sense–making, in this view, can be addressed in terms of interactions with the sounds, both at the level of perception, action and mental processing. It is a position that broadens the scope of music research, encompassing all kinds of music and sounds, and going beyond any kind of cultural and historical constraints. Music, in this broadened view, is to be defined as a collection of sound/time phenomena which have the potential of being structured, with the process of structuring being as important as the structure of the music. As such, it is possible to transcend a merely structural description of the music in favour of a process–like description of the ongoing process of maintaining epistemic contact with the music as a sounding environment. A central focus, in this approach, is on the role of musical experience and the way how listeners make sense of music as it sounds (see Blacking, 1955; Määttänen, 1993; Reybrouck, 2004; Westerlund, 2002)."

(Mark Reybrouck, 2012)

Reybrouck, M. (2012). "Musical sense–making and the concept of affordance: an ecosemiotic and experiential approach". Biosemiotics, 5 (3), 391–409.

TAGS

2012 • adaptive control • affordancesbiology • biosemiotic claims • Charles Sanders Peircecircularityconceptual framework • consummation • coping with the environment • cybernetics • ecological approach to perception • ecological psychology • ecosemiotic claims • empirical evidence • enactive cognition • epistemic interactions • epistemic interactions with sound • experiential cognition • formation of formfunctional significance • functional tone • interaction with the environmentinterdisciplinary focus • interpretant • Jakob von Uexkull • James GibsonJohn Deweylistening • Mark Reybrouck • music • musical behaviour • musical sense-making • neurobiological research • ontological category • operational description • perceptual phenomenonpragmatismsensemaking • sounding music • sounding phenomen • systemic cognition • William James

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 APRIL 2013

SCALE-UP: solving the shortcomings in traditional physics instruction

"Studio/workshop classes such as SCALE–UP (Student–Centered Activities for Large Enrollment Undergraduate Programs) give instructors another choice by replacing the lecture/laboratory format with 4–6 hours of activity–based instruction per week, typically in 2–hour blocks. This format has several advantages over the traditional lecture/laboratory format. Because the entire class is taught in the same room with the same students and instructors in each class, all activities, including laboratory experiments, can be arranged to build on one another in sequence for greater learning impact (14) than when some activities are taught in small sections running parallel to the lecture course. When a lab section is taught as a separate course, it is often weeks or at best a few days ahead of or behind the lecture, and for some students, the lab course is not even taken in the same term as the lecture. Additionally, even in an interactive lecture, students can avoid instructors by hiding in the middle of the row, away from the aisles. In the studio format, instructors can freely circulate and interact with any group at any time."

(Robert Beichner and Jeffery Saul)

TAGS

active learningactivity-based instructionactivity-based learning designs • American Association for the Advancement of Science • biologychemistryclassesclassroom • conceptual understanding • curriculum development • faculty interactions • faculty membershands-on activities • hands-on experiments • instructional materials • interactive lecture activities • interactive lecture demonstrations • interactive lectures • introductory curricula • laboratory • laboratory experiments • large classes • learning and teaching • lecture course • lecture/laboratory formatpedagogic approachespedagogic practices • pedagogic support • peer instruction • PER • physics • Physics Education Research • physics instruction • physics tutor • recitation • SCALE-UP • SCALE-UP project • small classes • STEM subjects • Student-Centred Activities for Large Enrollment Undergraduate Programmes • studio approach • studio/workshop classes • teaching methodstraditional practices

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 NOVEMBER 2012

Thomas Allen: whimsical pulp fiction cut-outs

"Playing the role of scientist, [Thomas] Allen enlists mid 20th–century books on the natural phenomenon of science(astronomy, physics, electricity, biology) and presents his research as if through the eyes of his 8–year old daughter. How would she understand and portray these theories and absolutes of science?

Allen's signature use of cutting and repurposing book illustrations has not vanished. Instead of the pulp fiction genre, Allen plays with 50's era versions of clean cut youths and domesticated moms. His unmistakable talent for creating the illusion of 3D in photography with his deft cuts and crimps, establishes a magical world in which a boy and girl play tag creating their own kind of electricity, a milkman makes a very special delivery in space, young toughs play marbles with the solar system and a mother busily sews her own version of 'string theory.'"

(Foley Gallery, 2012, New York NY)

Fig.1 Bearings, 2012. Fig.2 Eclipsed, 2012.

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TAGS

1950s201220th century2Dartistastronomybiologybookbook illustrations • clean cut • compositioncut-out • cut-out characters • cut-out illustration • cuts and crimps • design craftdomesticatedelectricityexhibition • Foley Gallery • gallerymagical worldmid 20th-century • natural phenomenon • physicspop-uppulp fictionrepurposingsciencescientific illustrationshallow depth of field • theories and absolutes of science • Thomas Allen • through the eyes • vintage books • whimsical interactions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 NOVEMBER 2010

MIT OpenCourseWare: free online course materials

"MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) is a web–based publication of virtually all MIT course content. OCW is open and available to the world and is a permanent MIT activity."

(Massachusetts Institute of Technology)

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TAGS

2002academic community • aeronautics • anthropologyarchitecture • astronautics • athletics • atmospheric sciences • audienceauthorship • biological engineering • biologybrain sciencechemical engineeringchemistrycivil engineeringcognitive science • comparative media studies • computer sciencecoursewaredisseminatione-learningearth scienceseconomicseducational mediaelectrical engineeringengineering • engineering systems division • environmental engineering • foreign languages • foreign literature • gender studies • health sciences and technology • history • humanistic studies • initiativeiTunes UlecturelinguisticsliteraturemanagementMassachusetts Institute of Technologymaterials sciencemathematicsmechanical engineeringmedia artsmedia studiesMIT • MIT course content • MIT OpenCourseWaremusic arts • nuclear science • OCWonline lecturesopenphilosophy • physical education • physical recreation • physics • planetary sciences • political sciencepublishingrepositoryresourcescholarshipscienceteaching materials • technology and society • theatre artsurban planningurban studiesVLEweb-based publication • writing studies

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 MAY 2010

Scientists create first synthetic living cell

"Scientists in the US have succeeded in developing the first synthetic living cell. The researchers constructed a bacterium's 'genetic software' and transplanted it into a host cell. The resulting microbe then looked and behaved like the species 'dictated' by the synthetic DNA. ... The researchers constructed a bacterium's 'genetic software' and transplanted it into a host cell. The resulting microbe then looked and behaved like the species 'dictated' by the synthetic DNA. ... Dr [Craig] Venter likened the advance to making new software for the cell. The researchers copied an existing bacterial genome. They sequenced its genetic code and then used 'synthesis machines' to chemically construct a copy. Dr Venter told BBC News: 'We've now been able to take our synthetic chromosome and transplant it into a recipient cell – a different organism. 'As soon as this new software goes into the cell, the cell reads [it] and converts into the species specified in that genetic code.' The new bacteria replicated over a billion times, producing copies that contained and were controlled by the constructed, synthetic DNA. 'This is the first time any synthetic DNA has been in complete control of a cell,' said Dr Venter."

(Victoria Gill, BBC News)

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TAGS

2010artificial life • bacteria • bacterial genome • bio-ethicsbiologybreakthroughcelldiscoveryDNAethics • genetic code • genetic engineering • genetic software • microbeorganismspeciessynthesis machinessyntheticsynthetic biology • synthetic living cell • Synthia

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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