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Which clippings match 'Intimate Interactions' keyword pg.1 of 1
15 APRIL 2015

Webcam Venus (and other NIRL Masterpieces)

"In Webcam Venus, we asked online sexcam performers to replicate iconic works of art. This piece is an experimental homage to both fine art and the lowbrow internet phenomenon of cams. Sexcams use webcams and chat interfaces to connect amateur adult performers with an audience. Users log on to see men, women, transsexuals, couples and groups broadcast their bodies and sexuality live for the public, often performing for money. To create this experiment in high and low brow media, we assumed anonymous handles and spent a few hours each day for a month asking performers: 'Would you like to pose for me?'

What is beauty today? By operating in the language of sexcams, we alter the contemporary ideal of beauty with the ubiquitous display of sexuality online. We challenge the institutions which enforce false perceptions of propriety—via nudity in classical painting—as the only form of acceptable safe-for-work beauty. Publicly presented traditional paintings and sculptures are prevalent with sexuality and gender politics, and yet the display of nudity online is usually defined as 'pornography'. Amateur adult broadcasters also resist the popular, contemporary definition of beauty. They are not the typical definition of beauty prevalent main stream media: heavily Photoshopped image in the name of advertising, which destroys self image and confidence while encouraging materialism. Sexcam performers are the apotheosis of the most honest parts of us and yet typically the least valued part of a society. Even though they are transmitted virtually, they are real people and they are beautiful."

(Addie Wagenknecht, 5 March 2013, Free Art and Technology Lab)

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TAGS

2013 • Addie Wagenknecht • adult imagery • adult performer • Amadeo Modigliani • amateur adult broadcasters • body politics • cam space • cam-girl • camgirl • chat model • classical beautycritical reinterpretation • Danae • de-sexualisation • depictions of mendepictions of women • digiphrenia • display of sexuality • Edgar Degas • Eugene Delacroix • fine art masterpiece • Free Art and Technology Lab • gender politicsgraphic sex actsin real life (IRL) • interactive online spaces • intimate interactions • IRL • James McNeill Whistler • La Fornarina (1518) • la Gioconda (1506) • La Vague (1896) • Leonardo da Vinci • live cam • Mademoiselle Rose (1824) • mediated representation • Mona Lisa (1506) • NIRL • not in real life (NIRL) • NSFWnude in western art • Pablo Garcia • porn performer • public intimacy • Raphaelreal peoplereclining nudeRembrandt van Rijn • self-aware • self-conscious • sex chat • sexcam • sexcam performer • sexual depictions • sexuality online • spectacular societytableau vivantTitianVenus of Urbino (1538)webcam sex • Webcam Venus (2013) • western artWilliam-Adolphe Bouguereau • Woman with a Comb (1884)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 NOVEMBER 2014

The Visitor: Living by Numbers (2001)

Luc Courchesne (2001). 'The Visitor : Living by Numbers' immersive experience (reflexive Panoscope) work premièred at Art Gallery of New South Wales (Sydney, Australia), August 2001.

"Interactive video panorama for computer with microphone and hemispheric projection system (Panoscope 360). Created with support from the Daniel Langlois Foundation for Art, Science and Technology, the International Academy for Media Arts and Sciences, the Canada Council for the Arts, Université de Montréal and the Société des arts technologiques (SAT). The original version is in English.

General description: The Visitor: Living by Numbers is inspired by Pier-Paolo Pasolini's 1969 film Theorema and by a dream Courchesne's daughter had when she was 10 years old. In the installation, visitors are planted somewhere in the Japanese countryside. From there they will try to make a life for themselves by saying any number between one and twelve to indicate the direction they want to go or to show interest in people and what they have to say. Exploring the territory, happening upon and entering a shelter, meeting and dealing with the inhabitants and gaining status within the group will define a visitor's experience. Leaving the place and the inhabitants to themselves (as in Pasolini's film) or being forced to escape after an earthquake (as in his daughter's dream) will further characterize the visitor's experience.

The experience starts in daytime, in the middle of rice fields just north of Ogaki-City in central Japan (Gifu Prefecture). In the inner garden of a low building, visitors will happen upon a woman preparing tea. This first encounter may lead to an invitation to diner where a mixed group of people (6) prepare and share a Japanese style stew (nabet). The diner is endless but conversations with dining partners may bring a visitor to spare moments in the intimacy of one's room where he or she is offered the host's mind and thoughts on different topics growing increasingly personal. In the process, a visitor builds a position in the group that either will have him invited to take more place among the group, or gradually ignored and abandoned.

Meanwhile, night has come and the risk of an unforgiving event in this earthquake prone area is more tangible. If such a thing was to happen, destroying the shelter and forcing everyone out, visitors would, depending on their status, be left behind or invited to join in the chaotic and confuse quest for a new place where every aspect of this group’s life will resume in the same way as if nothing had happened."

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TAGS

2001 • Art Gallery of New South Wales Sydney • art installationAustraliaimmersive aesthetic experienceimmersive experienceinteractive artworkintimate interactionsintimate interfaces • Japanese countryside • Luc CourchesneSydney

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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