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Which clippings match 'Voyeurism' keyword pg.1 of 2
07 NOVEMBER 2013

Virtual girl called 'Sweetie' used to stop webcam child sex tourism

"To show how unrestrained child predators can act but also to show how easy it is to track them down the Dutch child rights organisation put itself in the shoes of a 10–year–old Filipino girl. With an innovative technology the virtual character Sweetie was created to be controlled by Terre des Hommes researchers. From a remote building in Amsterdam the researchers operated in public chat rooms. In a very short period, over 20,000 predators from around the world approached the virtual 10– year–old, asking for webcam sex performances. While the adults interacted with the virtual girl, the researchers gathered information about them through social media to uncover their identities. With this evidence Terre des Hommes Netherlands is pushing all governments to adopt proactive investigation policies, with a world wide petition, starting today."

(Hans Guyt, The Hague, 4 November 2013, Terre des Hommes)

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20133D visualisationAmsterdamavatarbelievabilitybotchat roomchild abuse • child exploitation • child pornographychild protection • child rights • child sex tourism • child victims • developing nationsdigital actorsexploitation • Filipino • girl • Hans Guyt • human-likehyperrealismillegal behaviourinnovative technologylaw enforcementlifelikelolitaNetherlandsonline youth victimisation • perpetrator • Philippines • post-traumatic stress • posting onlinepredatorprotectionpuppetreal-life dollsafeguardingsex crimesex offenders • sex tourism • sexual acts • sexual exploitationsexual fetishsexual slaverysexualised depictions • Sweetie (virtual girl) • synthespian • Terre des Hommes • victimvirtual charactervirtual girlvisual depictionvoyeurismvulnerabilityvulnerable groupsvulnerable peoplewebcam • webcam child sex tourism • webcam sexyoung childrenyoung people

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 AUGUST 2013

Scary Gorgeous by the dance company RashDash

"Scary Gorgeous and it's about the pressure on young women to appear sexually available and post provocative pictures of themselves on the web, and also about how sexual relationships are damaged when our imaginations become colonised by pornographic images."

(Lyn Gardner, 15 August 2011)

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2011 • Abbi Greenland • commodifying myselfcommodity fetishismdance theatregender performance culture • Helen Goalen • me in pictures • mediated by images • mediated representationnormalising over-sharingon the webperformativitypornographic imagesposting onlineprovocative pictures • RashDash (dance company) • relations between people • Scary Gorgeous (dance) • self-shotsselfiesexual depictionssexualised depictionssocial life • social pressure • spectacular societyteenvoyeurismyoung peopleyoung women

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 OCTOBER 2012

Blue Velvet: the dark underside of America's collective fantasies

"Blue Velvet begins with the lily–white small town of America's collective fantasies and shows us its dark underside: drugs, violence, sex, and particularly sexual perversion. Our hero, Jeffrey, hiding in the dark, peers through the slats of Dorothy Vallens' closet at Dorothy getting undressed and Frank's strange sadomasochistic sex with her. Jeffrey stands for all of us American filmgoers peering (voyeuristically!) at Evil in traditional American films. Lynch clues us as to how we should read his film when he shows us a cluster of ants under the Beaumonts' pretty lawn. This is Tennyson's nature red in tooth and claw–the underside of cutesy Lumberton with its free enterprise propensity for cutting down trees."

(Norman N. Holland)

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1986 • Alfred Tennyson • ants • Blue Velvet (1986) • collective fantasies • communitydark undersideDavid Lynch • Dennis Hopper • Dorothy Vallens • drugs • evil in films • feature filmfilm • filmgoers peering • free enterprise • hiding in the dark • Isabella Rossellini • Kyle MacLachlan • Laura Dern • lily-white • Lumberton • melodramanature • pretty lawn • repressionsadomasochistic sexsexsexual perversionsmall townsmall town Americasocietyundercurrents • underside • violencevisual spectaclevoyeurism

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JUNE 2011

Robbie Cooper's Immersion project

"Immersion is a project that records video of people 'through the screen' as they play games, use the internet and watch TV. There's three of us involved in the actual production of the footage– Andrew Wiggins is a camera man based in London, whilst Charly Smith is a First Assistant Director, also based in London. In 2010 we'll be working with the Media Center at Bournemouth University, on an 18 month study called 'War and Leisure', of teenagers and war in the media. Using the Facial Action Coding System, developed by Paul Ekman, we'll be analysing the reactions of teenagers to war in video games, movies, news footage, documentaries and online video. Outside of this study we're also filming people consuming a range of media– everything from the shopping channel, porn, sports, to programming created for babies."

(Robbie Cooper)

Fig.1 Cooper, R. (2010). "Immersion". Bradford, National Media Museum.

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absorptionaddiction • analysing reactions • Andrew Wiggins • applied researchBournemouth UniversityBournemouth University Media School • Charly Smith • consumptionengrossmentface • Facial Action Coding System • facial nuancefilming peoplegestureimmersion • Immersion Project (2010) • internet use • intimacyliving picturesmicro expressionsmicroexpressionNational Media Museumnonverbal cuesobservation • Paul Ekman • play games • playing video gamesportraiturereaction video • Robbie Cooper • shopping channel • surveillanceteenagers • through the screen • viewing porn • visual spectaclevoyeurism • War and Leisure • war documentaries • war in news footage • war in the media • war in video games • war movies • watch TV • watching • watching online video • watching sports • watching television

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MARCH 2011

Returning to Michael Powell's Peeping Tom after 15 years

"Peeping Tom has been widely celebrated as one of the great films about looking, about consumption, about cinema, about art, about the artist, about the relation between the artist, the artwork and the audience, about the relation between looking and pleasure, looking and desire, looking and death, and so on. All very familiar stuff from Freudian and Lacanian psychoanalysis and film studies (the film's tailor–made for film studies – bring in some Freud here, some Bataille and de Sade there, add a little Lacan and Virillio, etc). The aggressive and violating camera, as Scorsese put it. And this is partly the problem with Peeping Tom. Like the films of Peter Greenaway or David Cronenberg, Peeping Tom is more like an academic essay about voyeurism and scopophilia, a join–the–dots lecture on the pleasures, risks and dangers of art. Plus, Peeping Tom employs the most stereotypical, cliched thriller/ murder mystery plot you can imagine: a young man, a loner, a misfit, introspective, morbid, an outsider figure, abused as a child, etc etc etc, who murders sexualized women (prostitutes and actresses), and is befriended by an innocent he cannot bring himself to corrupt or kill.

Powell attacks the subject of voyeurism and murder aggressively in the opening scenes: the close–ups on cameras, projectors and eyes, the mirrors and reflections, exaggerated sounds (the rattle of a projector, a dripping tap, a heartbeat, whispered voiceover), and his love of visual rhymes and puns (eyes, drinks, sticks and tripods). You can see Powell having a ball in orchestrating his elaborate camera moves, his erotic, sleazy mise–en–abyme, his film–within–a–film tropes (Powell playing the murderer's father and torturer in home movies which he shot himself), the multiple reflections, mirrors, lenses, cameras, projections and screens (every shot in Peeping Tom seems to have been lit by a raking, unfiltered, unflattering horizontal light). It's not that Powell isn't at the top of his game in Peeping Tom – in its way, Peeping Tom is every bit as inventive as Powell's best work – it's that the plot, the characters, the situations are so cheesy, predictable, and shallow.

Despite all this, though, Peeping Tom does have bite and a nastiness which age hasn't dimmed. Peeping Tom also still feels 'contemporary' in its psychoanalytic treatment of a serial killer plot which draws on prostitution, cinema, acting, and pornography. And the conceit of having a murder in the opening shots which's replayed a moment later over the credits is a tour–de–force (one of the film's best cinematic ideas, this says everything necessary, and economically, in the first five minutes)."

(Jeremy Robinson)

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1960abuseaggressionartartistartworkaudienceBritish directorBritish film directorcameracinemaclicheclose-upconsumptionDavid Cronenbergdeathdesire • Emeric Pressburger • erotic • essayfilmfilm studies • film-within-a-film • Freudian • Georges Bataille • innocenceintrospectionJacques Lacan • join-the-dots • Leo Marks • loner • looking • Marquis de Sade • Martin ScorseseMichael Powellmirrormise-en-abymemisfitmorbidmurdermurder mysteryoutsider • Paul Virilio • Peeping Tom (film) • Peter Greenawaypleasurepornographyprojectorprostitutionpsychoanalysis • pun • reflectionscopophilia • scoptophilia • serial killer • sexualised • sleazy • stereotypethrillerUKviolation • visual rhyme • voyeurism

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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