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Which clippings match 'Bebo' keyword pg.1 of 1
25 OCTOBER 2012

Joanna Shields leaves Facebook to join UK's Tech City

"Facebook's European boss Joanna Shields is to leave the social network to lead the UK government's investment group for technology start–ups.
The Tech City Investment Organisation (TCIO) supports firms based near the Silicon Roundabout area of east London.
Ms Shields will replace current head Eric Van Der Kleij in January 2013.
'Joanna's experience will be hugely valuable in supporting Tech City as it goes from strength to strength,' Prime Minister David Cameron said.
'The success of Tech City shows just what can happen when we back some of our most innovative and aspiring companies to grow, helping the UK compete and thrive in the global race.'
Ms Shields has been Facebook's vice–president and managing director of Europe, Middle East and Africa since 2010.
Prior to that she worked at Google and teenage–focused social network Bebo."

(Dave Lee, 22 October 2012, BBC News)

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TAGS

2013Bebobusiness leadersDavid Cameroneast LondonEast London Tech CityEric van der KleijFacebookGoogle Inc • Joanna Shields • LondonSilicon Roundaboutsocial networksocial networking • TCIO • Tech City • Tech City Investment Organisation • UK • UKTI • women in businesswomen in leadership positionswomen in technology

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 FEBRUARY 2012

Social networking sites: devoid of cohesive narratives

Baroness Susan Greenfield "told the House of Lords that children's experiences on social networking sites 'are devoid of cohesive narrative and long–term significance. As a consequence, the mid–21st century mind might almost be infantilised, characterised by short attention spans, sensationalism, inability to empathise and a shaky sense of identity'.

Arguing that social network sites are putting attention span in jeopardy, she said: 'If the young brain is exposed from the outset to a world of fast action and reaction, of instant new screen images flashing up with the press of a key, such rapid interchange might accustom the brain to operate over such timescales. Perhaps when in the real world such responses are not immediately forthcoming, we will see such behaviours and call them attention–deficit disorder. ...

She also warned against 'a much more marked preference for the here–and–now, where the immediacy of an experience trumps any regard for the consequences. After all, whenever you play a computer game, you can always just play it again; everything you do is reversible. The emphasis is on the thrill of the moment, the buzz of rescuing the princess in the game. No care is given for the princess herself, for the content or for any long–term significance, because there is none."

(Patrick Wintour, political editor guardian.co.uk, 24 February 2009)

2) Leading neuroscientist Lady Greenfield on the impact of spending hours in front of the computer and what makes a friend.

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TAGS

21st centuryattention spanattention-deficit disorderBebobrain • buzz • cohesive narrativescomputer game • consequence • consequencesexperienceFacebookfast actiongames • here-and-now • House of Lords • human mind • hypermediacyimmediacyimmediacy of experience • inability to empathise • infantilised • information in context • jeopardy • knowledge construction • long-term significance • narrative • new screen images • no care • play • play it again • press of a key • princess • rapid interchange • reaction • responses • reversible • screen culture • screen life • screen world • sensationalism • sense of identity • short attention span • social construction of knowledgesocial networking servicesocial networking sitessound biteSusan Greenfield • thrill of the moment • young brains

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 MAY 2009

Bebo employed by Irish dissident republicans to recruit children

"Police are investigating claims that dissident republicans are attempting to recruit children as young as 13 through social networking sites.
...
A number of different sites claiming to be linked to dissident groups have attracted hundreds of young people as members which urge Irish youths to 'join the struggle'.

A site on Bebo claiming to be in support of the Real IRA asks young people to join and 'show support for dissident republicans!'."

(Victoria O'Hara, 23 April 2009, Belfast Telegraph)

TAGS

anglophobiaBeboBelfastbelongingCatholicChristiancoercioncommunityemotive manipulationethicsgangIreland • loyalist • Northern Ireland • Protestant • radicalisation • Real IRA • Republicansocial changesocial networkingsociety • taig • violence

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 NOVEMBER 2008

Social software used for mobilising a campaign against those convicted of causing the death of 'Baby P'

"The identity of the 27–year–old mother of Baby P was last night being circulated on the internet with the names of her boyfriend and the third man convicted of causing the child's death, after online vigilantes began a campaign calling for violent retribution against them.
...
Facebook shut down pages carrying threats and abusive comments about the mother after thousands of users subscribed to groups carrying the names of the couple and Jason Owen, 36, who were convicted at the Old Bailey this week of causing the 17–month–old boy's horrific death. The judge's order allows Owen's identity to be made public.

One Facebook group was entitled 'Death is too good for [the mother's name], torture the bitch that killed Baby P'. Another that carried the name said 'Baby P killers should be hanged Drawn and Quartered'. The page contained graphic threats of violence and the addresses of the three.

Facebook said that although many of the comments on the chat groups it hosted reflected conversations taking place 'from the House of Commons to the man on the street', it was making sure that comments breaking the court order and its own rules were removed.

Another social networking site, Bebo, removed the mother's profile page after abusive messages were posted, while her Friends Reunited profile was also being circulated.

The difficulties of policing the internet were highlighted when the mother's name briefly appeared in a discussion thread about Baby P hosted by The Sun. The information was removed.
...
Mark Stephens, of the Internet Watch Foundation, said: 'There is a ... problem with trying to enforce court orders that apply to the UK ... We either need to develop more sophisticated ways of dealing with this kind of information when it is posted or we decide to recognise the permeability of information once it reaches the internet.'"

(Cahal Milmo, Saturday, 15 November 2008, The Independent)

TAGS

ad-hoc • Baby P • Bebocampaigncommunication • court order • cyber vigilantismFacebook • Internet Watch Foundation • online • retribution • smart mobssocial interactionsocial softwaresocietyUKviolenceviral

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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