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03 JANUARY 2013

The Value of Culture: Mass Culture

"Melvyn Bragg considers how technology and increasing access to education made possible the rise of a true mass culture in the twentieth century. He examines how the rise of cinema and photography opened the cultural realms to millions, and how our understanding of what culture is, and what it's for, was transformed by the work of scholars such as Richard Hoggart and Raymond Williams."

(Melvyn Bragg, 2013)

"The Value of Culture: Two Cultures", Radio broadcast, Episode 4 of 5, Duration: 42 minutes, First broadcast: Thursday 03 January 2013, Presenter/Melvyn Bragg, Producer/Thomas Morris for the BBC Radio 4, UK.

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TAGS

20th centuryaccess to educationAngela McRobbie • Arnold Bennett • art • art and entertainment • cinemacultural diversity • cultural realms • cultural studiescultureculture and society • culture theory • David Puttnam • educated classes • Emile Zola • Englishness • entertainmentEuropean cinemaeveryday cultureF R Leavis • free public education • George Bernard ShawGeorge OrwellGustave FlaubertH G Wells • half-educated • highbrow • imperialism • John Carey • lowbrow • mass civilization • Mass Civilization and Minority Culture • mass culture • mass reading public • mass societymedia technologyMelvyn Bragg • minority culture • modernist intellectuals • overpopulationphotographypop-culture • provincial culture • Raymond Williams • regional cultural • Richard Hoggart • Robert Hewison • science fiction literature • semi-educated • silent cinemaStuart Hall • The Intellectuals and the Masses • The Time Machine • The Uses of Literacy • The Value of Culture (radio)Thomas Stearns Eliot • travel photography • working class culture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 JANUARY 2009

Barack Obama: our patchwork heritage is a strength, not a weakness

"For we know that our patchwork heritage is a strength, not a weakness. We are a nation of Christians and Muslims, Jews and Hindus – and non–believers. We are shaped by every language and culture, drawn from every end of this earth; and because we have tasted the bitter swill of civil war and segregation, and emerged from that dark chapter stronger and more united, we cannot help but believe that the old hatreds shall someday pass; that the lines of tribe shall soon dissolve; that as the world grows smaller, our common humanity shall reveal itself; and that America must play its role in ushering in a new era of peace."

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 JANUARY 2009

Does the world need Esperanto?

"[Esperanto] was very much the child of its times, like Theosophy, perhaps, or even Communism, which explains both its rapid spread in the early part of the 20th century as well, I think, as its eventual failure, if that's the right word, to live up to the hopes of the hopeful [Dr Ludwik Zamenhof], the founder of the movement.
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It's also unsurprising that after the nightmare of the first world war, so many people around the world were inclined, in an era of modernism, to imagine peace in universalist terms.

A century later, we live in a rather different world, one where diversity (in dialects, ethnicities, customs, beliefs) is widely celebrated as a very fine thing, while anything that smacks of a grand narrative (a universal truth, a universal movement, anything hegemonic) is regarded with suspicion, although not universally, naturally."
(Robert Dessaix, 21 January 2006, ABC Australia)

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TAGS

20th centurybeliefscommunismcultural diversitycustomsdialectdifferenceEsperantoethnicitygrand narrativeshegemonylanguagelingua franca • Ludwik Zamenhof • modernism • singularity • Theosophy • universals

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 NOVEMBER 2008

FOB Mixtape

In April 2008, FOB Mixtape brought their music to the Australian public in their first live show at Federation Square in Melbourne. Armed with 'music with a difference' but a modest budget, FOB Mixtape used the social networking website, MySpace to garner support and interest in their show. The band members created a promotional video and viral marketing: digital promotional strategies that are increasingly used by emerging and established artists to engage instantly with large audiences, without huge overheads. FOB Mixtape is an Australian hiphop group with a social conscience and their music aims to challenge racial stereotypes of Asian migrants in Australia. FOB Mixtape draw on their experiences as second generation migrants to write humorous lyrics such as 'I ain't the type of guy that you're used to seeing, the human being that's a few between a gook and a European'. The group takes a tongue and cheek look at the plight of being labelled an 'Asian' in Australia today, as seen in the group's name FOB Mixtape or 'Fresh Off the Boat'', which is immigrant slang used to describe newly arrived migrants. Recently featured on the SBS series mY Generation, FOB Mixtape can be seen as typical of Generation Y's expressing themselves through digitally sampled music, their ease with using online marketing – all of which was created in the basement of one of their parent's home. This experience of FOB Mixtape is an example of a new form of civic engagement that uses everyday, digital technologies to address some of the racial intolerances that exist in the culturally diverse societies of Australia today.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Mia Thornton
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