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Which clippings match 'Optical Illusion' keyword pg.1 of 2
29 JUNE 2014

Bernard Pras: the perceptual organisation of found objects

"Bernard Pras is a French painter, photographer and sculptor. He has spent more than 20 years perfecting his craft. One of his more recent body of work feature sculptures of pop icons made entirely out of found objects which, when viewed from a specific angle, transforms into an easily recognizable image. His subjects include Albert Einstein,, Jack Nicholson, Bob Marley, Mao Zedong, Uncle Sam, and Che Guevarra. His inspirations include Salvador Dali, Edvard Munch, Japanese woodcut artist Hiroshige, and Guiseppe Arcimboldo."

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 MARCH 2014

Real or Illusion? Honda CR-V Spot Keeps You Guessing

"'An Impossible Made Possible,' shows the CR–V 1.6 i–DTEC Diesel traversing a surreal landscape of complex and cool visual effects. At one point, we get an Ames room type illusion where a woman blows on her coffee, apparently setting a toy Honda CR–V 1.6 atop a table in motion. It turns out the SUV is really a full–size model parked a few yards behind her ... but the weird eye–candy in the scene doesn't end there. ...

The exceedingly stylized clip, directed by Chris Palmer of Gorgeous, succeeds as a pure content play, and the main advertising element, a somewhat clunky voiceover that talks about 'less fuel in for more miles out,' seem almost intrusive. Still, the point that things aren't always as they appear–a rule this campaign applies to various qualities of the Honda CR–V 1.6, such as gas mileage–is made in exceptionally eye–opening fashion."

(David Gianatasio, 22 October 2013, Adweek)

Fig.1 Honda Illusions, An Impossible Made Possible – New CR–V 1.6 Diesel Video

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TAGS

2013ad campaignAdweek • Ames room illusion • An Impossible Made Possible (ad campaign) • anamorphic • anamorphic illusion • anamorphosiscarcar ad • Chris Palmer • eye candyforced perspectiveHonda • Honda CR-V • illusionistic spaceoptical illusionperceptual organisation • Sports Utility Vehicle (SUV) • surreal landscapevisual effectsvisual illusionvisual perception

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 MARCH 2013

WW1 Razzle Dazzle ship camouflage

"Most camouflage is based on the idea of concealment and blending in with its surroundings. However another school of thought has argued for making the item in question appear to be a mashup of unrelated components. Naval camoufleurs found this theory particularly appealing. Blending didn't work because ships operated in two different and constantly changing color environments – sea and sky. Any camo that concealed in one environment was usually spectacularly conspicuous in others.

Norman Wilkinson, a British naval officer and painter, suggested a scheme that came to be known as Dazzle or Razzle Dazzle painting. Wilkinson believed that breaking up a ship's silhouette with brightly contrasting geometric designs would make it harder for U–boat captains to determine the ship's course."

(FoundNYC Inc, 4 April 2009)

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TAGS

1917angular shapesappearanceapplication of design • battleship • blend in • blending • blending in • blocks of colourbreaking up • bulk • camo • camouflage • camouflage pattern • colourcolour schemeconcealment • conspicuous • constantly changing • dazzle • dazzle painting • dazzle ship painting • dead-end technology • disruption pattern • disruptive colouration • disruptive patterndistortiongeometric designsinterruptioninvisibilitymilitary • naval camouflage • naval camoufleurs • navy • Norman Wilkinson • optical illusionoutlinepainting • Razzle Dazzle • sea • seascape • shapesshipsilhouetteskyspatial ordersurroundings • U-boat • unrelated components • vessel • visual abstractionvisual patternvorticismWorld War IWW1zig-zag

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 JANUARY 2013

Anemic Cinema (1926) by Marcel Duchamp

"This characteristically dada film by Marcel Duchamp consists of a series of visual and verbal puns with nonsense phrases inscribed around rotating spiral patterns, creating an almost hypnotic effect. Silent.

Anemic Cinema (various versions were made in 1920, 1923 and, finally, in 1926). Essentially a film by Duchamp with help from Man Ray. Calvin Tomkins: 'Duchamp used the initial payment on his inheritance to make a film and to go into the art business. The film, shot in Man Ray's studio with the help of cinematographer Marc Allégret, was a seven–minute animation of nine punning phrases by Rrose Sélavy. These had been pasted, letter by letter, in a spiral pattern on round black discs that were then glued to phonograph records; the slowly revolving texts alternate with shots of Duchamp's Discs Bearing Spirals, ten abstract designs whose turning makes them appear to move backward and forward in an erotic rhythm. The little film, which Duchamp called Anemic Cinema, had its premiere that August at a private screening room in Paris.'"

(UbuWeb)

Marcel Duchamp (1926). "Anémic Cinéma", 7 minutes, B&W.

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TAGS

1926 • Anemic Cinema • art historyavant-garde cinema • Calvin Tomkins • circle • concentric cirles • Dadadada filmdiscs • disk • erotic rhythm • gyrating • hypnotic effectMan Ray • Marc Allegret • Marcel Duchampmovement • nonsense phrase • op artoptical artoptical effectoptical illusionpatternperceptual phenomenonphonograph • phonograph turntable • pulsating alternation • revolving • rhythm • rotary demisphere • rotating spiral patterns • rotation • Rotoreliefs • Rrose Selavy • spinning • spiral • spiral pattern • spiraling • stereo-kinetic effect • surrealist cinematurntableUbuWebvelvet • verbal pun • visual experience

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 OCTOBER 2012

Four to the Floor: the ever growing collection of Channel 4 idents

An "ever growing collection of Channel 4 current set of idents. The simple idea that flows through all these idents is the creation of 'the 4, be it optical illusion, supernatural intervention or coincidence, the iconic Channel 4 logo rears its head at some point during all these videos.

The basic premise leaves open many possibilities to play with, which perhaps also explains the longevity that these idents retain. New idents continue to be produced by Channel 4"

(John Beohm, idents.tv)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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