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Which clippings match 'Guerrilla Tactics' keyword pg.2 of 3
16 NOVEMBER 2008

Peter Kennard: photomontage activist

"Peter Kennard has spent most of his life in London, and has been considerably more involved than most in the capital's political gatherings during the last 25 years.
...
His two major subjects quickly emerged: armaments and poverty. This was the early eighties with 3 million unemployed, Thatcher in her first term girding her loins for the Falklands War, and the CND at the height of its popularity. Kennard had an audience.
...

'The point of my work is to use easily accessible iconic images, but to render them unacceptable. To break down the image of the all–powerful missile....after breaking them, to show new possibilities emerging in the cracks and splintered fragments of the old reality.'

His belief at this time was that photomontage had the power to show the causes rather than the results. In recent times however, he seems to have had his doubts: 'There is a problem with montage in that you see it everywhere now because of digital technology. There is so much transformed imagery around that people accept constructed images without questioning their meaning. I think my work was losing impact because of that.'"
(David Palmer)

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TAGS

activismart • CND • culture jammingcut and paste • Falklands War • guerrilla tacticsMargaret Thatcherparody • Peter Kennard • photographyphotomontagepolitical satirepoliticspropagandare-purposeridiculetacticTony BlairUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 NOVEMBER 2008

John Heartfield

[Short extract from America's Ovation TV on pioneering photomontage activist John Heartfield.]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 NOVEMBER 2008

Giant Corporation Insinuates Itself Through Guerrilla Tactics

"Microsoft unleashed a swarm of large adhesive butterflies in Manhattan.

They settled yesterday morning on sidewalks and doorways; traffic signals, stop signs and planters. They alighted on the bluestone paving around Grand Army Plaza and the granite corners around Grand Central Terminal.

Their blue, green, orange and yellow wings had spans of 12 to 20 inches, the larger ones accompanied by a caption –– 'It's better with the Butterfly' –– advertising Microsoft's new MSN 8 Internet service.

'This is nothing more than corporate graffiti,' said Vanessa Gruen, director of special projects for the Municipal Art Society, a civic organisation that has long battled commercialisation of public space. 'It's no better than all those kids out there tagging subway cars.'
...
A single summons was issued, with a [US] $50 penalty, though each butterfly could have been subject to a $50 fine, said Tom Cocola, the assistant commissioner for public affairs at the transportation agency. He said the city's chief goal was seeing to it that the decals [slickers] are removed.

Microsoft, for its part, insisted that it was authorised to place the decals."
(David W. Dunlap, New York Times, October 25, 2002)

[Pioneering example of guerrilla marketing tactics employed by Microsoft across Manhattan in 2002.]

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TAGS

adad campaign • adhesive butterflies • advertisementadvertisingadvertising in public spacesbillboardbrandingbutterflydecalenvironment • fly posting • graffiti • guerrilla marketing • guerrilla tacticsManhattanMicrosoft • MSN • New Yorkpublic spacestickertaggingtangible advertising mediaurban space

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 NOVEMBER 2008

Guerilla Gardening: revitalising urban spaces

"Guerilla gardening has been given its name because it's not about going through tonnes of red tape to ask the Government permission to do something with the land they've ignored or forgotten about. Guerilla gardening is about taking matters into your own hands to make your surroundings a better place to live.

As a guerilla gardener you can be part of a fully–fledged green army taking on mighty battles with the city landscape, or a lone warrior of peace making small changes here and there. You can bring green to the urban desert in a full–scale or small–scale way. You can grow a seed in a pot at home then replant it somewhere in your city, or you can join a guerilla gardening association (there are loads around) and take over a bit of wasteground, turning it into a living green community space."
(Magda Knight)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 AUGUST 2005

Enemy Image: where is the human tragedy?

"The [Enemy Image] traces the development of the image of war on American television from Vietnam to the present day. Enemy Image uses outstanding reports and images from American wars of the last 30 years to explore the changing role of the war correspondent and the strange disappearance of dead bodies from the image of war. Writer–Director Mark Daniels comments, 'This film developed out of my encounter with the remarkable Vietnam War reporting of Wilfred Burchett and Roger Pic. They witnessed and reported that war as no other Westerners could, and their body of work remains an historical treasure. 'Their films opposed American images of technical and material power with images of revolutionary solidarity, improvisation, and sacrifice. With the War in Iraq, – journalists 'embedded' with American and British forces brought sights and sounds from the battlefield to the living room, live.' But where was the tragedy? Where was the cruelty? Where was the heroism?"
(The Guardian)

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TAGS

AmericaAmerican War in VietnambattlefieldCBScurrent affairsdocumentary • Enemy Image • guerrillaguerrilla tacticsguerrilla warfare • image of war • Iraqjournalism • Mark Daniels • mediaphotojournalismreportage • Roger Pic • televisionVietnamVietnam warwarwar correspondent • Wilfred Burchett
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