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Which clippings match 'Guerrilla Gardening' keyword pg.1 of 1
12 APRIL 2013

Guerrilla Gardening: Seed Bombs & Seed Balls

"I've been following guerrilla gardening on Twitter for quite some time, and have become familiar with the term 'seed bombing' as a result. It's an idea that's always appealed to me – it's a kind of eco–friendly, bee–friendly, slightly radical anti–vandalism activism – but it's just one of those things that I'd never pursued. ...

So how do they work? It's a simple process really – the seeds I bought are encased in a ball of peat–free compost, dried clay and chilli, which are hand–rolled in North London (yes, really, and no, it's not what you're thinking). The dried clay acts as a protective casing from common seed predators (such as ants, mice and birds). When enough rain permeates the clay, the seeds inside begin to germinate – helped along by the nutrients and minerals contained within the balls. So it's like a tiny self–sufficient seeding system. Maya [http://www.mayaproject.org/] have added chili powder to the mix to help to deter predators while the seed ball slowly degrades, and eventually the seeds sprout."

(Lucy Small, 5 April 2013)

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TAGS

activismagriculture • anti-vandalism activism • ball • bee-friendly • chili • compost • DIY gardening • earthcare • eco-friendly • fairshare • gardening • germination • guerrilla gardeningguerrilla tacticsNative Americans • peat-free compost • peoplecare • permacultureplants • project MAYA • seed • seed balls • seed bomb • seed bombing • seed bombs • seeding system • self-sufficientsustainable society

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 NOVEMBER 2008

Ad Campaign Appropriates Activism and Direct-Action

"Here's an ad campaign for Adidas new eco range, Grun, that is bringing together quite a few green concepts into one curious melange. First we've got the product––Adidas has a a new line of shoes which are made from recycled and natural materials. They are also making clothing from hemp and bamboo; the new Reground range is fully biodegradable, including the first ever completely biodegradable zipper. Their Recycled line is made of materials such as old tyres. Then the advertising and green link: they have joined up with dazed & confused (magazine) to encourage people to do guerilla gardening in grim and ugly places; swapping spray cans and tags for seeds and bulbs. Submit a picture of your efforts and the ten winners get a discount on any Adidas gear.

Then they have added a sculptural "art" element––this sinister looking "hand" (pictured) made of wicker and wire is 12 feet high and is perched on a shop roof, overlooking a busy street in London's hip east end, as part of the promotion. Another creation, now gone, was a skip full of flowers. They are planning ten more of these around town. It's all interesting, but what it adds up to is a bit of a confusing mish mash of green elements."

(Bonnie Alter, London on 04.21.08)

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TAGS

adad campaignAdidasadvertisementadvertisingappropriationart • biodegradable • commercialconsumerismecoenvironmentgreenguerrilla gardeningplantingre-purposerecycleurban spaceviral

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 NOVEMBER 2008

Guerilla Gardening: revitalising urban spaces

"Guerilla gardening has been given its name because it's not about going through tonnes of red tape to ask the Government permission to do something with the land they've ignored or forgotten about. Guerilla gardening is about taking matters into your own hands to make your surroundings a better place to live.

As a guerilla gardener you can be part of a fully–fledged green army taking on mighty battles with the city landscape, or a lone warrior of peace making small changes here and there. You can bring green to the urban desert in a full–scale or small–scale way. You can grow a seed in a pot at home then replant it somewhere in your city, or you can join a guerilla gardening association (there are loads around) and take over a bit of wasteground, turning it into a living green community space."
(Magda Knight)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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