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Which clippings match 'Experience Design' keyword pg.1 of 1
15 APRIL 2013

A history of play equipment design (by theme and by designer)

"Spielplätze sind relevante Orte in der Stadt. Diese Erkenntnis hat in der Zeit zwischen 1945 bis ca. 1970 ein kleine Zahl von Architekten, Landschaftsarchitekten und Künstlern zu neuen Spielkonzepten inspiriert. Die Seite architekturfuerkinder dokumentiert diese Pioniere und ihre Spielplätze und Spielgeräte, weil ihr Ideenreichtum, Zivilcourage, geistige Freiheit und Frechheit faszinieren."

(Gabriela Burkhalter)

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20th centuryad-hocadventure playgroundagencyAldo van EyckAlfred Trachsel • Angel Duarte • Ant Farm (architecture) • architecture for children • Arvid Bengtsson • Bernhard Luginbuhl • Cornelia Hahn Oberlander • Creative Playthings Inc • Egon Moller-Nielsen • Ernst Cramer • experience designexploration of unfolding possibilitiesexploratory experimentation • history of playgrounds • imaginationimpromptu playimprovisationIsamu Noguchi • Jacques Sgard • Jacques Simon • Joseph Brown • jungle gymKuro KanekoLady Allen of Hurtwoodlandscape architecturelandscape designLe Corbusiermake-do playgrounds • Mary Mitchell • Michael Grossert • Mitsuru Senda • NIDO • Niki de Saint Phalle • open-ended play spaces • Palle Nielsen • Paul FriedbergPaul Hoganplace for children • play environments • play spacesplayground • playground equipment • playground spacesplayscapes • Richard Arioli • Richard Dattner • Robert Royston • scriptible spaces • Soren Carl Theodor Marius Sørensen • The Ludic Group • user experience design (UX)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 DECEMBER 2012

Designing the Bookshop of the Future

"What makes a good bookshop? Should second–hand be in the mix too? Is a café important? How do you incorporate digital? Foyles' clarion call at the Bookseller's FutureBook conference in London last week seeks to answer some of these questions.

The retailer has joined forces with the Bookseller to invite customers and industry experts to help design its new flagship on Charing Cross Road, which it will move into in early 2014. With discoverability of increasing importance, the timing couldn't be more apposite. Everyone is agreed that bricks and mortar bookshops are under threat, but what elements are needed to make a physical bookstore survive in an increasingly digital world? ...

'Foyles has to create something that gives people an experience,' said former London Book Fair Director Alistair Burtenshaw. 'It has to be a destination store, a shop in which people want to spend a considerable amount of time. It has to be an environment that adds value. When you make it a more personalized experience, you are happy to pay more."

(Roger Tagholm, 12 December 2012)

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2014 • Alistair Burtenshaw • booksellersbookshop • bookshop of the future • bricks and mortarcafeCharing Cross Roadconference • consumer destination • Covent Gardencustomersdestination imagedestination storedigital worlddiscoverabilitydwell timeeconomic recessionenvironment that adds valueexperience design • Foyles (shop) • FutureBook (conference) • high streethigh street shopsincorporate digital • Livraria Cultura • London • London Book Fair • Miriam Robinson • personalised experience • Philip Jones • physical bookstorephysical presencephysical storeretailerSao Paolo • second-hand • shift to digitalshopspatial environmentsspend time • Stanfords Travel Bookshop • The Bookseller • UKuser experience design (UX)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 DECEMBER 2012

Immersive underwater experience for high school students

"The Virtual Reef is a life–sized marine ecosystem expanding across two levels of the new Science and Engineering Centre. Multi–touch technologies enable the user to manipulate, intimately explore and interact with the reef world, specific behaviours and relationships.

Australia's leading marine science and interactive and visual design organisations, QUT and the Queensland Museum, bring knowledge and research of the underwater world to your fingertips through multi–touch screens and projectors.

Users will have the opportunity to go beyond the cinematic experience and interact with the marine world. Each interaction has associated content designed to complement the aims of the National Curriculum and provide an exploratory learning experience."

(Jeff Jones, the Cube, QUT)

Fig.1 "The Virtual Reef" project team: Professor Jeff Jones (Cube Project Leader), Associate Professor Michael Docherty (Project Leader), Warwick Mellow (Principal Animator/Art Director), Joti Carroll, Paul Gaze, Sean Gobey, Ben Alldridge, Sophia Carroll, Sherwin Huang, Bryce Christensen.

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20123Danimation • art director • asset creation • Australia • Ben Alldridge • Bryce Christensen • character rigging • cinematic experience • creaturedigital engagementdigital technologyecologyecosystemexperience designexploratory learning experienceexplore and interactfish • Great Barrier Reef • healthy oceanshigh schoolimmersive environmentsimmersive experienceinteractioninteractive displayintimate interactionJeff JonesJoti Carroll • life-sized • marine • marine ecosystem • marine science • marine world • Michael Docherty • multi-touch screenmulti-touch technologiesnational curriculumnatural environment • Paul Gaze • Queensland Museum • Queensland University of TechnologyQUTQUT Cube Projectsreefresearch projectresource for studentsScience and Engineering Centre • scientific exploration • scientific visualisation • Sean Gobey • Sherwin Huang • simulated experience • Sophia Carroll • The Cube Projects • The Virtual Reef • underwater • underwater experience • underwater world • user experience design (UX)virtual heritagevisual representations of scientific conceptsvisualisationWarwick Mellowwildlife

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 DECEMBER 2012

Plug and play: the 'new purpose' of physical consumer space

"an effective physical connection is still absolutely imperative to brand success. Rather than assuming that the physical space is being hindered by the growth of digital activity, brands and designers are beginning to embrace the newer channels where consumers are choosing to spend their time and deliver a physical environment that adds value around these. Get the basic understanding of the 'new purpose' of the physical space right and the physical manifestation of the design will boom from there.

The key is to design interiors that can respond and morph with social and cultural shifts, so that the spaces become a form of 'cultural commentary', adding value to the popular activities of today's audiences. Above all, interior design must be approached in a way that ensures that the brand communicates a relevant message through this critical channel. This can be achieved by considering and responding to three key topics: cultural relevance, social context and technology integration."

(Lucy Johnston, Design Week)

Fig. "The Anthropologist", iloveretail.com

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activity and consumption • added valueadded value through design • always connected • audience • brand concepts • brand success • brands • buying online • colourways • communication channel • concrete space • consumer culture • consumer experience • consumerscultural commentarycultural relevance • cultural shifts • design features • design interiors • digital activity • digital designdigital worlddwell timeeffective brand spaceexperience designgraphic designinterior design • Lucy Johnston • new purpose of the physical space • personal freedom • physical connection • physical consumer spacephysical environmentphysical manifestationphysical retail spacephysical space • plug and play • popular activities • print design • relevant messages • respond and morph • social context • social shifts • solid space • spacesspatial designsuccessful brand spacetechnology integrationuser experience design (UX)virtual world

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 APRIL 2005

Smart Space: interactive information data space

"Financial data and financial news, by its nature, is a very dry affair – well to most of us who are not in the financial world.

Bloomberg is about communication and information – and we had to find away to showcase this in away which would appeal to all age groups–all walks for life in this very public space opposite Tokyo Station in the new heart of Maruonuchi."

(Klein Dytham Architecture)

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