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Which clippings match 'Censorship' keyword pg.1 of 5
04 FEBRUARY 2016

Retailer uses drones to playfully respond to social media censorship

"clothing retail store BUYMA recently produced a creative commercial that strictly wants you to buy their clothes. Since Japanese TV programs are legally obligated to cover sensitive body parts, BUYMA uses drones to fully censor two professional belly [sic] dancers while they dance their routine naked."

[This Buyma ad which was created for television clearly plays with concepts around censorship - both in the context of Japanese broadcast media and perhaps more importantly in the context of social media where it will likely have most traction. In doing so the ad playfully references contemporary restrictions in place on sites such as Facebook.]

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2015ballet • Buyma (retailer) • censorshipcheekyclassical balletclothing retailercomedy of mannerscultural conventionsdancedroneetiquette • flying drone • high-technology • hoverJapan • Japanese online retailer • morality • naked ballet dancing • naughty • nude man • nude women • nudity • obscenity • obscuring nudity • online retailer • playful provocation • playfulnesspolite societyquadcoptersexual taboo • social media censorship • social shopping service • tabootv adtv advertveiledviral advisual gag

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 NOVEMBER 2014

Patti Smith and David Lynch speak candidly about their work

"The discussion was recorded for BBC Newsnight's 'Encounters' series, with topics ranging from the influence of Bobby Vinton's 1963 hit 'Blue Velvet' on Lynch's film of the same name, seeing Jerry Garcia's ghost, liking to ''bite' paintings, as well as 'Twin Peaks', which Smith says 'reconnected [her] to the world and art'."

(Luke Morgan Britton, 20 November 2014, NME)

[Patti Smith and David Lynch have a brief conversation at the Fondation Cartier in Paris where they discuss each other's work and their mutual respect for each other. BBC2 Newsnight Encounters, 13 November 2014.

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2014 • BBC Newsnight • BBC2 • Blue Velvet (1963) • Blue Velvet (1986)Bobby Vinton • candid conversation • censorshipDavid LynchEraserhead (1977) • Fondation Cartier • Grateful Dead • ideas emerge incrementally • ideas emerge like jigsaw puzzle pieces • influential filmmakerinfluential musician • Jerry Garcia • materialising piece by piece • mutual respect • mutual understanding • NME • ParisPatti SmithPussy Riot • short conversation • state censorship • Twin Peaks

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 SEPTEMBER 2014

To Singapore, with Love: Singaporean political exiles remember

"Some places are better observed from a distance if you want to grasp their inner essence. For this portrait of her hometown, the tropical economic powerhouse of Singapore, Tan Pin Pin decided on a strictly external perspective. She meets with political exiles in London, Thailand, and Malaysia who had to leave the city thirty–five or fifty years ago–and who are to this day not permitted to return unless they die and their relatives bring back their ashes. The protagonists of the film fought for increased democracy and for Singapore to be freed from colonialism. They escaped long prison sentences and judicial capriciousness, but at the price of exile. They have a heightened view of the city today, full of dreams yet also analytical: To Singapore, with Love [星国恋] is a homage to individual fighters whose lives have been shaped by emigration. They tell their stories more as utopians than as victims, opening up amazing perspectives on an ultra–modern city in a democratic coma as well as on life in exile, whose path is never straightforward for those who do not lose sight of their goals, even when far away from home."

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2013activist • Asian Cinema Fund • British Colonial Government • Busan International Film Festival • card carrying communist • censorshipcolonialismcommunism • communist party • democratic coma • detention without trial • displaced • documentary film • emigration • English countryside • escape • exile • fled • homagehometown • Internationale Filmfestspiele Berlin • judicial capriciousness • life in exile • lives • Malaysia • not permitted to return • political exile • political exiles • political persuasion • prison sentence • Singapore • Singaporean • student leader • Tan Pin Pin • Thailand • To Singapore with Love (2013) • United Kingdom • utopian

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 FEBRUARY 2013

Pre Certification Video

"A 'pre-cert video' (Pre-Certification) is any videotape (or laserdisc/CED) issued in the UK before the introduction of the 1984 Video Recordings Act.

Pre-cert videos were not required by law to be submitted to the BBFC so the era was unregulated, leading to many uncut releases of videos which would have fallen foul of the BBFC's strict guidelines, and would therefore have been censored if submission to the board was a legal requirement.

However, whilst many of the larger respectable companies simply issued their previously BBFC certificated cinema releases onto video to play safe as they feared there was bound to be a clampdown at some stage, some of the smaller independent companies decided to take advantage of the unregulated video rentals market by issuing 'strong uncut' versions depicting graphic violence and gore. A whole barrage of titles previously banned by the BBFC from getting a cinema release suddenly ended up uncensored on home video.

What began as a bill drafted by little known Luton Tory back bencher Graham Bright was made law after he and the tabloid press (most notably The Daily Mail) had successfully whipped the media into a frenzied hysteria over so-called 'video nasties'. Ban the Sadist Videos! was one of the more famous headlines they ran. When the bill was made law it became a legal requirement that all videotapes must be submitted to the BBFC for classification (and possible cuts).

The pre-cert video era is best remembered (amongst horror fans in particular) for the ensuing 'video nasty' debacle in which a selection of 72 videotapes were singled out and prosecuted by the DPP (Director of Public Prosecutions) under Section 2 or Section 3 of the OPA (Obscene Publications Act). Of these, 39 titles were deemed by the courts to be obscene and it's those titles which formed the final 'Video Nasties list."

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1984analogue mediab-moviebad tastebanned • Betamax • British Board of Film Classification (BBFC) • Capacitance Electronic Disc (CED)censorship • cinema release • collectiblesDaily Mail • DiscoVision • exploitation films • exploitation movies • film classification • gore • Graham Bright • graphic violencehome video • LaserDisc • legislationmisogyny • Music and Video (magazine) • nostalgia • Obscene Publications Act (OPA) • obscenityobsolete medium • Popular Video (magazine) • pre-cert video • pre-cert video era • pre-cert videos • pre-certification video • rare video releases • SelectaVisionsexploitation • shocksploitation • slasher • slasher film • sleaze • teensploitation • Television and Home Video (magazine) • UK • unregulated industry • VCR (N1500) • VCR (N1700) • VHS • Video 2000 • Video Business (magazine) • Video Cassette Recorder (VCR) • Video Cassette Recording • Video Compact Cassette (VCC) • video distribution • video nasties • video nasty • Video News (magazine) • Video Recordings Act • video releases • video rental • video rentals market • Video Retailer (magazine) • Video Review (magazine) • Video The Magazine • Video Today (magazine) • Video Trade Weekly (magazine) • Video Viewer (magazine) • Video Week (magazine) • Video World (magazine) • videocassette • videocassette recorder • VideoDisc • videotapes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 OCTOBER 2012

Alain Resnais and Chris Marker's: Les Statues meurent aussi

"Les Statues meurent aussi, co–directed with Alain Resnais. This 30 minute short film has a chequered history of censorship that at one time elevated it to a somewhat mythical status (2), and which prevented it from being brought into the wider public eye until some 16 years after it was completed. After its first screening at the Cannes Film Festival in 1953, and in spite of winning the Prix Jean Vigo in 1954, Les Statues meurent aussi was banned in France by the Centre National de la Cinématographie between 1953 and 1963 owing to its controversial anti–colonialist stance (3). While a truncated version was made available in 1963, the unabridged film only became available in 1968.

Les Statues meurent aussi was commissioned by the literary review and publishing house, Présence Africaine, which was set up in 1947 in Paris as a quarterly literary review for emerging and important African writers. Founded by the Senegalese thinker Alioune Diop, it housed the writings of some of the most important francophone thinkers in the latter half of the 20th century, such as Aimé Césaire, Ousmane Sembene, Léopold Sédar Senghor, in addition to French metropolitan writers such as Jean–Paul Sartre and Albert Camus. The journal also translated groundbreaking works by Chinua Achebe and Wole Soyinka into French for the first time. Having emerged so soon after the new French Constitution of 1946 had declared a 'French Union', Présence Africaine's publications signalled a new, post–colonial status for French and francophone thought, embracing what was then a key notion: that of négritude (4). It is this notion that the second half of Les Statues meurent aussi engages with most deeply, and perhaps most controversially, especially as it strives to connect the death of the statue with the rise in the commercialisation of African art for the pleasure of the colonial classes. Indeed, it is against the backdrop of a France that had so recently lost its colonial power, but which still retained many of the quasi–Manichean distinctions between white, Western culture and black, African culture, that (and in spite of their claims to the contrary) Resnais and Marker's film projected its passionately anti–colonial, anti–racist, even anti–capitalist audio–visual collage. It is little wonder then that such a film should have been censored until the late 1960s, by which time it might have lost some of its topicality, but none of its political vigour."

(Jenny Chamarette, 14 September 2009, Senses of Cinema)

[1] Sarah Cooper, Chris Marker, Manchester University Press, Manchester and New York, 2008. As Cooper points out, Les Statues meurent aussi is available as an extra on the French DVD release of Resnais' Hiroshima mon amour, Arte France and Argos Films, 2004.

[2] See Roy Armes' entry on Les Statues meurent aussi in his The Cinema of Alain Resnais, A. Zwemmer/A.S. Barnes, London and New York, 1968, p. 34.

[3] This is heavily documented in scholarship on Marker and Resnais. In particular, see Cooper, p. 12; Emma Wilson, Alain Resnais, Manchester University Press, Manchester and New York, 2006, pp. 22–4; Nora M. Alter, Chris Marker, University of Illinois Press, Urbana, Chicago, 2006, pp. 58–9.

[4] For further details see V.Y. Mudimbe (ed.), The Surreptitious Speech: 'Présence Africaine' and the Politics of Otherness, 1947–87, Chicago University Press, Chicago, 1992, pp. 3–4.

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1953 • African art • African cultureAlain Resnaisanti-capitalism • anti-colonial • anti-colonialist • anti-racist • audiovisual • audiovisual collage • censorship • Centre National de la Cinematographie • Chris Marker • colonial classes • colonial powercommercialisationcritique • death of the statue • European imperialismfilmfilm essayFranceintercultural • Les Statues meurent aussi • negritude • post-colonial • post-colonialismpostcolonial • Presence Africaine • Senses of Cinema (journal)statue • Statues Also Die • Western culture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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