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21 MARCH 2015

Loophole Cinema: artist collective exploring film in an expanded form

"1989 -1998 A collective of artists, specialising in large scale installation and performance work, usually of a site specific nature."

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TAGS

16mm1989artist collectiveaudiovisual performance • Bea Haut • Ben Hayman • bodily intervention • British artistcelluloidexpanded cinemaexperimental artistic practices • exterior skin • film in an expanded form • film projection • Greg Pope • image creation • inter-related moments • interactive shadow engines • interior space • Ivan Pope • Javanese shadow puppets • kinetic machinery • large scale installationlight projection • Loophole Cinema (artist collective) • magic lanternmaterial practicemulti-screen • multi-screen projection • multi-screen projection works • multiscreen projections • non-representationaloptical toy • Paul Rodgers • performance work • pre-cinematic history • projected image • projection works • self and surroundings • shadow photographyshadow playsilent film • site-responsive works • site-specific installation • videorama technologies • visual abstractionvisual pattern

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 JULY 2013

Isidore Isou's influential Venom and Eternity

"This experimental film ('Venom and Eternity') by Isidore Isou constitutes the Letterist manifesto of film. Rejecting film conventions by 'chiseling' away at them, Isou introduced several new concepts, including discrepancy cinema where the sound track has nothing to do with the visual track. In addition, the celluloid itself was attacked with destructive techniques such as scratches and washing it in bleach. Causing a scandal at the 1951 Cannes Film Festival, this film was later introduced in the United States where it influenced avant–garde film makers such as Stan Brakhage."

(Internet Archive)

Fig.1 Isidore Isou (1951). Traité de bave et d'éternité. Venom And Eternity.

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1951 • anarchism • artistic expressionavant-garde cinemaavant-garde film maker • bleach • celluloidcinema • cinema is dead • cinematic conventionsconventionsdeath of cinemadeath of the authordeface • destructive techniques • discrepancy cinema • Eric Rohmer • experimental filmformal workformalismGuy Debord • influential practitioners • influential worksInternet Archive • Isidore Isou • Jean Cocteau • letterist manifesto • lettrism • lettrist movement • Maurice Scherer • rejectionRomanian • Romanian filmmaker • scratches • situationism • situationistStan Brakhagestock footagesync sound • Venom and Eternity (1951)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 AUGUST 2012

Paolo Gioli's cinematic tone poem to Marilyn Monroe

"Italian film maker Paolo Gioli creates a haunting short movie by animating photographs taken by Bert Stern of Marilyn Monroe shortly before she died at the age of 36, fifty years ago today.

Filmarilyn is both beautiful and foreboding. As the film's jazzy rhythms start to disintegrate and the images slow to a crawl, 'X' marks on the contact sheets appear like magical curses and a fresh scar on Marilyn's flesh transforms into a stigmata while her face, half–hidden by shrouds of white, eyes closed, turns impossibly pale and lifeless. In the final moments, close–ups of her hands in death–like repose seem almost saintly and as the film's last frames unspool we are left with the sense of having seen an apparition, a ghost... a soul X–rayed.

It's amazing how much power and sadness Gioli creates from so few elements – a testimony to his artistry, Marilyn's radiance and Stern's skill in capturing it."

(Marc Campbell, 05 August 2012, Dangerous Minds)

Fig.1 Paolo Gioli (1992) "Filmarilyn", uploaded to Vimeo by Volodymyr Bilyk.

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1992 • actress • animated sequenceanimated video • animating photographs • apparitionavant-garde cinema • Bert Stern • blondecelluloid • contact sheet • cultural icondeath • death-like repose • depth of focus • disintegrate • experimental film • eyes closed • Filmarilyn • Filmmarilyn • final moments • forebodingfound imagesframe by frameghost • haunting • HollywoodHollywood starletjazz rhythm • lifeless • manipulated images • Marilyn Monroe • modulated object framing • motion designnon-narrative • Paolo Gioli • photographic blow-upspop iconre-purposerhythmic motionrisque • scar • scavengedsequence design • sex symbol • short film • short movie • shrouds of white • simulate dimensionality • slow to a crawl • soul • stigmata • still images • still photographs • stop-frame animation • superstar • tantalizing • tone poem • unspool • visual recessions • X marks • x-ray

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 JANUARY 2012

Film Fading to Black: ARRI, Panavision and Aaton have quietly ceased production of film cameras

"While the debate has raged over whether or not film is dead, ARRI, Panavision and Aaton have quietly ceased production of film cameras within the last year to focus exclusively on design and manufacture of digital cameras. ...

'The demand for film cameras on a global basis has all but disappeared,' says ARRI VP of Cameras, Bill Russell, who notes that the company has only built film cameras on demand since 2009. 'There are still some markets––not in the U.S.––where film cameras are still sold, but those numbers are far fewer than they used to be. If you talk to the people in camera rentals, the amount of film camera utilization in the overall schedule is probably between 30 to 40 percent.'

At New York City rental house AbelCine, Director of Business Development/Strategic Relationships Moe Shore says the company rents mostly digital cameras at this point. 'Film isn't dead, but it's becoming less of a choice,' he says. 'It's a number of factors all moving in one direction, an inexorable march of digital progress that may be driven more by cell phones and consumer cameras than the motion picture industry.'

Aaton founder Jean–Pierre Beauviala notes why. 'Almost nobody is buying new film cameras. Why buy a new one when there are so many used cameras around the world?' he says. 'We wouldn't survive in the film industry if we were not designing a digital camera.'

Beauviala believes that that stereoscopic 3D has 'accelerated the demise of film.' He says, 'It's a nightmare to synchronize two film cameras.' Three years ago, Aaton introduced a new 35mm film camera, Penelope, but sold only 50 to 60 of them. As a result, Beauviala turned to creating a digital Penelope, which will be on the market by NAB 2012. 'It's a 4K camera and very, very quiet,' he tells us. 'We tried to give a digital camera the same ease of handling as the film camera.'

Panavision is also hard at work on a new digital camera, says Phil Radin, Executive VP, Worldwide Marketing, who notes that Panavision built its last 35mm Millennium XL camera in the winter of 2009, although the company continues an 'active program of upgrading and retrofitting of our 35mm camera fleet on a ongoing basis.'

'I would have to say that the pulse [of film] was weakened and it's an appropriate time,' Radin remarks. 'We are not making film cameras.' He notes that the creative industry is reveling in the choices available. 'I believe people in the industry love the idea of having all these various formats available to them,' he says. 'We have shows shooting with RED Epics, ARRI Alexas, Panavision Genesis and even the older Sony F–900 cameras. We also have shows shooting 35mm and a combination of 35mm and 65mm. It's a potpourri of imaging tools now available that have never existed before, and an exciting time for cinematographers who like the idea of having a lot of tools at their disposal to create different tools and looks.'"

(Debra Kaufman, 2011, Creative COW)

Fig.1 The Xterà by Aaton (Super16 camera with film magazine).

Fig.2 The Penelope–Delta by Aaton (digital camera with internal full resolution recorder).

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16mm200935mm • 35mm camera • 4K • 4K camera • 65mm • Aaton • AbelCine • ARRIARRI Alexascameracamera-making businesscelluloidcinemacinematographer • consumer cameras • creative industries • demise of film • devicedigitaldigital cameradigital cinematographydigital filmmakingdigital progressDSLR • ease of handling • feature filmfilmfilm camerafilm industryfilm makingfilmmaking • Jean-Pierre Beauviala • motion picture industry • obsolescencePanavision • Panavision Genesis • radical innovationRED Epic • Sony F-900 • stereoscopic • Super16 • technology innovation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 JULY 2005

Bill Morrison's Decasia: Decomposition Disrupting A Smooth Transfer Between Images

"Like many experimental filmmakers, [Bill] Morrison is fascinated more by the physical properties of film than its use as a transparent medium for the projection of images, an orientation he chalks up to his background in painting. In its pristine state, celluloid is a flat, smooth strip which passes effortlessly through a projector. But as it begins to decay, the celluloid buckles and shrinks and the image–fixing emulsion disintegrates — spectacularly in the case of volatile nitrate stock, which was the industry standard until 1951. Such decomposition is a preservationist's worst nightmare, but for Morrison, it represents a way of disrupting the smooth transfer between images which, 24 times a second, characterises traditional narrative film."

Sam Adams (Philadelphia City Paper)

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TAGS

2002avant-garde • Bill Morrison • cameraless cinema • celluloid • Decasia • decay • decompose • filmmakerfoundfound footagematerialist cinemamateriality • nitrate film • preservation • Sam Adams • USA
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