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Which clippings match 'Woman Photographer' keyword pg.1 of 1
03 DECEMBER 2012

Cindy Sherman - Nobody's Here But Me (1994)

"New York based artist, Cindy Sherman, is famous for her photographs of women in which she is not only the photographer, but also the subject. She has contributed her own footage to the programme by recording her studio and herself at work with her Hi–8 video camera. It reveals a range of unexpected sources from visceral horror to medical catalogues and exploitation movies, and explores her real interests and enthusiasms. She shows an intuitive and often humorous approach to her work, and reflects on the themes of her work since the late 1970s. She talks about her pivotal series known as the 'Sex Pictures' in which she addresses the theme of sexuality in the light of AIDS and the arts censorship debate in the United States."

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199420th century art • AIDS • artist • arts censorship • BBC2Cindy Shermancolour photographscritical reinterpretation • dramatic lighting • dressing up • Eric Bogosian • exploitation filmsfemale artistfeminist artfictional scenariosfilm stills • Hi-8 video • humorous approach • Jamie Lee Curtis • Mark Stokes • medical catalogue • New York • Nobodys Here But Me (1994) • non-narrativeNorth American artist • nude photography • photographerphotographic portrait • photographs of women • representation of women • Robert Longo • sequential art • sex pictures • sexuality • strange subjects • street persona • visceral horror • woman photographerwomen artists • works series

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JUNE 2012

Tabitha Soren: in-between narratives capturing stories in flux

"Sometimes it's simply looking at a particular behavior in a new way that evokes a range of emotions. Photographer Tabitha Soren has created a series of photographs, Running, that stir up feelings of panic, tension, curiosity, and concern. Tabitha's photographs have power in their simplicity, and it's as if one edge of her photograph is the past and one is the future, creating an in–between narrative that captures a story in flux. As viewers, we are caught in a pivotal moment of cinematic tension, requiring us to imagine what came before and what comes after each image. The photographs become a series of short stories that seem to shout 'get me the hell out of here.'"

(Aline Smithson, 23 May 2012, Lenscratch)

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a story in flux • arresting imagesarresting time • cinematic photography • cinematic tensionconcerncuriosityemotionfeelings of panicget me the hell out of here • in flux • in media resin-betweenin-between narratives • influx • lookingnarrative photographynarrative scenespanicphotographerphotographspivotal momentrunningseries • series of photographs • series of short storiesslice of frozen timeslicedstasis • stir up feelings of panic • story • Tabitha Soren • tensionvisual spectaclewhat came beforewhat comes afterwoman photographerworld of the story

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 FEBRUARY 2012

Joyce Campbell's Garden of Ambrotype Peculiarities

"L.A. Botanical is, specifically, a series of ambrotypes, an early form of photography, invented in 1850, the same year that the City of Los Angeles was incorporated as a municipality. At the time, the population comprised a mere 1,610 hardy souls. The population explosion of the following 150 years into the Los Angeles we know today resembles (from an imaginary aerial vantage point) an algal bloom, or bacterial inflorescence[ii]–the visible record of a natural imbalance

Ambrotypes are negative images on glass plates which, when shown against a black backdrop, appear to be positive. The name comes from the Greek ambrotos, 'immortal', a rather poetic way of evoking the power of photography to fix forever the fragile moment. Plants, particularly flowers, have long been the favorite metaphor of poets, painters, and now photographers for the passage of time–they are our most consistent reminder of mortality, and yet our most frequent solace at times of bereavement.

Though the ambrotype predates early moving pictures, Campbell's use of antique photography can't help but remind viewers of its sister medium, film, and the attendant connection with Los Angeles as a national and global 'dream factory' (or, indeed, that these technologies played their part in swelling the population of the fledgling city). Campbell's humble backyard blooms become, in L.A. Botanical, stars. The silver nitrate of the photographic process is linked, chemically and etymologically, to the silver screens onto which early films were projected. Campbell's botanical 'immortals' have been bequeathed eternal 'limelight' (another chemical process which, due to its use in theatrical lighting, is forever associated with fame)."

(Tessa Laird, 2006–2007)

Fig.1 "Black Walnut, Antifungal, anti–parasitic, antiseptic, herbicide and hair dye. To treat thrush, candida, ringworm and internal parasites. Ellagic acid and Juglone are being investigated as cancer treatments."

Fig.2 "Turpentine, From Ponderosa Pine, Paint thinner, solvent, liniment, antiseptic and treatment for lice and tapeworm."

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1850 • ambrotype • antique photography • Aotearoa New ZealandartistAucklandblackbotanical • chemical process • City of Los Angeles • creative practice • fix forever • flowers • fragile moment • fragility • glass plate • immortal • Joyce Campbell • L.A. Botanical • Los Angelesmetaphormomentmoving pictures • negatives • New Zealand artistpassage of timephotographer • photographic process • photographyplantplant information • silver nitrate • specimenstasisstill life photography • visible record • visual spectaclewoman photographer

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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