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10 DECEMBER 2011

Gangpol und Mit: sonic & visual in love

"As a music and graphic duet, Gangpol und Mit works on a peculiar world of digital pop inhabited by colourful and geometrical characters – a bestiary that evolves in lysergic musicals and takes part in apocalyptic cartoons. In this project, music jumps from synth assaults and woody flute leads to mondo beats and cinematic harpsichord keys, with futuristic social songs wrapped in fake MIDI string quartet attempts. Meanwhile, on the visual side, salarymen dive into greasy food, call–center employees start a batucada, and computer motherboards are slaughtered on a wild island while some terrorist confettis explode everywhere."

(Gangpol und Mit, 29 Octobre 2011)

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TAGS

Alpha-ville festivalanimationapocalyptic • batucada • bestiary • call-centre • cartooncharacter designcolourful characters • confetti • digital culturedigital popfakefuturistic • Gangpol und Mit • geometric • greasy food • lysergic • media artMIDI • mondo beats • motherboard • motion graphicsmusicsalarymansynthvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 MAY 2011

An Anthology of Graphic Fiction, Cartoons, and True Stories

"Comic art is a vital, highly personal art form in which change–rapid and unpredictable–is the norm. In this exciting new anthology, comic artist Ivan Brunetti focuses on very recent works by contemporary artists engaged in this world of change. These outstanding cartoonists, selected by Brunetti for their graphic sophistication and literary style, are both expanding and transforming the vocabulary of their genre.

The book presents contemporary art comics produced by 75 artists, along with some classic comic strips and other related fine art and historical materials. Brunetti arranges the book to reflect the creative process itself, connecting stories and art to each other in surprising ways: nonlinear, elliptical, sometimes whimsical, even poetic. He emphasizes continuity from piece to piece, weaving themes and motifs throughout the volume.

As gorgeously produced as Brunetti's previous anthology of graphic fiction, this book does full justice to the creative work of Art Spiegelman, Chris Ware, Charles Burns, Gary Panter, and the other prominent or emerging comic artists who are currently at work at the cutting edge of their medium."

(Yale University Press)

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TAGS

2008anthologyart form • Art Spiegelman • artistscartoonistscharacter design • Charles Burns • Chris Ware • comic art • comic artist • comic artists • comic strips • comicscontemporary artistscontinuitycreative practicecreative processcreative workdesign • design medium • drawing • Gary Panter • graphic novel • Ivan Brunetti • motifvisual communicationvisual language

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 MAY 2011

The regionalisation of knowledge in Korean design education

"Multimedia techniques change very quickly in Korea. All of the universities have made new departments for interactive media and have had more instructors who are involved in high technology such as Web design, game character design, motion graphics, and moving image design. After the development of the Internet and multimedia games and products, many companies have needed designers with new skills. Today, some schools are combining all of their art departments into one college. For example, one university usually has three colleges of art: one devoted solely to music, one devoted to art and design, and another devoted to human movement and performance. With the development of multimedia technologies, the distinctions between these various field are disappearing. Now, it's common to use motion graphics with dance. Many universities want to expand the art fields while at the same time trying to unite them. It's a good change. If the different arts are all in one college, collaboration is easier. Students can learn new skills from each other and think about their works in other creative ways. There are problems that remain to be addressed ... Most education is based on practical business. Many instructors are second–generation designers, meaning that they learned design from the first generation of Korean designers, who didn't have a sufficient basis for study. Many instructors teach design founded on their direct experiences in the design field rather than on theory, methodology, or intensive creative thinking and experiment. Some design programs focus on multimedia classes instead of teaching basic principals of design–technology is more important than ideas."

(HyunSoo Lim, 13 December 2006)

Fig.1 Minsun Eo (2008). 'Typography and the Rules'; 210 x 297 mm (folded), 594 x 841 mm (unfolded), Inkjet Printing Booklet/Poster; Exhibition at Hongdesign Gallery in Seoul, South Korea

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TAGS

2006AIGAart and designcharacter design • colleges of art • creative thinkingdesign businessdesign educationdesign experimentationdesign fieldsdesign graduatesdesign methodologydesign principlesdesign theorydesignersemployersgraphic design discipline • human movement • interactive mediaKoreamotion graphics • moving image design • multimedia • multimedia games • multimedia techniques • new departments • new skillspedagogyperformanceregionalisation of knowledgeSouth Koreauniversityweb design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 APRIL 2011

The death and rebirth of Duke Nukem Forever: a history

"Duke Nukem Forever was announced in 1997, after its predecessor, Duke Nukem 3D, had rocked the PC market with a hero who liked kicking ass, hanging out with strippers, and murdering alien police officers that were, literally, pigs. It was inappropriate, raunchy, and amazing.

It was also one of the games that gave 3D Realms the success that brought its destruction. Duke Nukem Forever began life as a completely self–funded game; its developer wanted nothing less than perfection, and would chase every update in technology in order to deliver it. The game saw monumental delays, suffered the slings and arrows of a gaming world that was first angry and then tolerant of its favorite whipping boy, had its home taken away, and has since risen from the dead.

Is the public still interested in Duke Nukem? Hell yes it is. This is the story of the gaming industry's favorite joke, and how Duke may finally have the last laugh."

(Ben Kuchera, 7 September 2010)

Fig.1 'Duke Nukem Forever | History of a Legend Episode 1', 2011

Fig.2 trailer from Electronic Entertainment Expo, 1998

Fig.3 video capture of 1991 side–scrolling 'Duke Nukum' version

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19911993199619972011 • 3D Realms • action heroalien invasion • Allen Blum • anti-hero • Apogee Softwarecharacter designcomic bookcomputer gameconsolecultural literacydeveloperdigital cultureDuke NukemDuke Nukem 3D • Duke Nukem Forever • Duke Nukem II • Duke Nukem: Manhattan Project • Duke Nukum • E3Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3)first-person shootergames • Gearbox Software • George Broussard • graphic representationheavy metalhistoryhomoeroticismhumour • Joe Siegler • Jon St. John • kick ass • kick ass and chew bubble gum • lair • Los AngelesmisogynyparodyPC gamesPlaystation 3point of viewpop-culture • Randy Pitchford • renegade • run and gunScott Millerself-fundedself-referentialsequel • SHMUP • side-scroller • spectaclestory • Todd Replogle • video gameviolencevisual depictionWolfenstein 3DXbox 360

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 NOVEMBER 2009

The Impact of Japanese Comics and Animation in Asia

"Taiwanese comics are the most Japanese of all Asian comics. Many Taiwanese comic artists copy the Japanese style faithfully and one can hardly find any Taiwanese elements in their works. However, there are Taiwanese artists who have attempted to create something original based on their mastery of Japanese techniques. The most successful example is perhaps Zheng Wen who has skillfully combined Japanese (particularly Ikegami Ryoichi and Kojima Geseki's) and Western comic styles with Chinese painting and calligraphic skills in his comics, such as Stories of Assassins (cike liechuan, 1985) and Stories of Eastern Zhou Heroes (dong Zhou yingxiong chuan, 1990). Taiwanese animators have only produced a few commercial animated films and television cartoons, but they are very active in making on–line animation. The most successful Taiwanese on–line animation is perhaps Ah Kuei, a satirical and humorous short piece, in which character design and visual presentation are influenced by Japanese animated works, such as Crayon Shinchan and Chibimaruko–chan. Ah Kuei will be made into a television cartoon series, live–action drama serial and animated film. Recently, Taiwanese on–line animators have begun to experiment animated serials and movies. A three–hour on–line animated film, Love 1/2E, has been serialized. Its story is similar to Tokyo Love Story and Beautiful Life and its drawing is very Japanese. Besides, influenced by the Japanese, Taiwanese animators pay attention to the important role of 'voice actors or actresses.' (seiyu). This is an area that most other Asian nations have overlooked."

(Ng Wai–ming, Hong Kong)

Journal of Japanese Trade & Industry: July / August 2002 p.2

TAGS

Ah Kuei • animated filmanimated filmsanimationanimatoranimeAsia • Asian comics • Beautiful Life • calligraphycartooncharacter design • Chibimaruko-chan • cike liechuan • comic artistscomics • Crayon Shinchan • creative practicedesign • dong Zhou yingxiong chuan • drawingHello KittyHong Konghumour • Ikegami Ryoichi • Japanese • Kojima Geseki • live-action • Love 1/2E • online animation • satirical • seiyu • serialSingapore • Stories of Assassins • Stories of Eastern Zhou Heroes • TaiwanTaiwanese • Taiwanese comics • television cartoons • Tokyo Love Story • visual communicationvisual languagevoice actors • Zheng Wen

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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