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Which clippings match 'Adobe Systems' keyword pg.1 of 2
12 NOVEMBER 2013

Brackets: open source code editor for web designers and front-end developers

Brackets is an open source community sandbox project which was originally created by Adobe.

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TAGS

Adobe Systemsasynchronous code • Brackets (editor) • browser inspection • browser preview • code • code editor • colour coding • CSS editing • debugger • debugging • editorfront-end developmentGitHubHTMLJavaScript • JS debugging • live editing • live HTML development • MIT Licenseopen sourcesource codetechnology solutiontoolsweb authoringweb designweb development

CONTRIBUTOR

Rob Canning
11 APRIL 2013

The debate in 1991: digital or hand-crafted type?

"Metal setting is practised today by only a handful of specialists, but it continues to provide the standards by which good typesetting is judged. Photosetting, and the computer setting which has largely displaced it, are criticised for being too perfect and lacking the character of hand–crafted type. Now, increasingly, designers are using desktop publishing systems such as the Macintosh to do their typesetting. The technology has matured considerably over the last two years and the time is ripe for a reassessment: is good typesetting possible on the Macintosh?"

(Andy Benedek, 1991)

Andy Benedek (1991). "The craft of digital type" Winter no. 2 vol. 1, Eye Magazine.

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TAGS

1991Adobe Systems • Aldus PageMaker • AppleApple LaserWriter • bit-mapped font • computer font • computer typesetting • Courier (typeface) • descender • design craftdesign for printdesktop publishingdisplay font • Emigre (magazine) • Eye (magazine) • font foundry • graphic designerhand-craftedhand-crafted typeHelvetica • hot metal typesetting • individual characterlegibility • letter-spacing • letterpress • Linotype (foundry) • MacMacintoshMacintosh computermetal type • metal typesetting • monotypeoffset printing • optical compensation • page description language • page layoutperfection • photosetting • PostScript • PostScript typeface • technology affordances • Times (typeface) • too perfect • traditional practicestypefacetypesettingtypography • Unternehmensberatung Rubow Weber • URW

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 AUGUST 2010

Most video on the web is published using the H.264 format

"Adobe has repeatedly said that Apple mobile devices cannot access 'the full web' because 75% of video on the web is in Flash. What they don't say is that almost all this video is also available in a more modern format, H.264, and viewable on iPhones, iPods and iPads. YouTube, with an estimated 40% of the web's video, shines in an app bundled on all Apple mobile devices, with the iPad offering perhaps the best YouTube discovery and viewing experience ever. Add to this video from Vimeo, Netflix, Facebook, ABC, CBS, CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, ESPN, NPR, Time, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Sports Illustrated, People, National Geographic, and many, many others."

(Steve Jobs, April 2010)

Fig.1 video of iPhone mugging attempt on Steven Levy's phone.

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TAGS

2010ABCAdobe FlashAdobe SystemsAppleCBSCNNCODECcontentconvergence • ESPN • FacebookFox NewsH.264HTML5 • iPads • iPhoneiPodmobile device • MSNBC • National Geographic Magazine • NetflixNew York TimesNPRPeople magazinepublishing • Sports Illustrated • Steve JobsTime Magazinevideovideo on the webVimeoWall Street JournalYouTube

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 NOVEMBER 2009

Adobe Illustrator 88

"The concept behind Illustrator 88 was so new that it needed a video tape to explain what it did and how to use it. For example, how would you have known how to use the Pen Tool, had you never seen one before? How would you have known about direction lines and anchor points? The Pen Tool is now available in most graphics applications, and we almost take it for granted."

(Rufus Deuchler, 30 April 2009)

[It's good to be reminded of the debt owed by graphic design to information technology.]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 SEPTEMBER 2009

How Firefox Is Pushing Open Video Onto the Web

"HTML 5, the emerging standard, is that content creators will be able to embed video and audio files on web pages with the same simplicity and ease as images and links.

The tools being used to power this behavior are the Ogg Theora and Vorbis codecs maintained by the non–profit Xiph.org. Currently, most video and audio on the web is presented using either Adobe's Flash Player, Microsoft's Silverlight or Apple's QuickTime. These are proprietary technologies, which means they come with various restrictions – licenses, patents and fees – attached.

Ogg, being open–source and patent–free, has no fees and very few use restrictions. Ogg has been around for a while. It was beaten out by MP3 in the Napster days as the audio format of choice, and has remained obscure ever since. It's also gotten a bad reputation because of poor quality and large file sizes compared to competing tools like h.264, which is used by both Quicktime and Flash, and will be used in the next release of Silverlight.

However, in the past year, the quality issues dogging Ogg have been largely solved thanks to the increased interest and involvement of developers who want to see support for open video on the web become a reality.

At a recent developer conference, Google showed off how it was building Ogg support directly into its Chrome browser to handle video playback without using any plug–ins. Mozilla's Jay Sullivan was then invited on stage, where he announced the next version of Firefox would also include built–in Ogg support, all part of a grand plan among browser makers to, in Sullivan's words, free video from 'plug–in prison.'"
(Michael Calore. Webmonkey, 18 June 2009)

TAGS

Adobe SystemsAppleChromeCODECconvergenceFirefox • Flash Player • Google IncH.264HTMLHTML5innovationinterdisciplinary • Jay Sullivan • MicrosoftMozillamp3Oggopen codecsopen sourceopen video • patent-free • QuickTimeSilverlightsolutiontechnologyTheoraVorbis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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