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04 DECEMBER 2012

Vodafone Romania launches digital library at Bucharest metro

"Vodafone Romania, in collaboration with the local publishing house Humanitas, launched 'Biblioteca digitala Vodafone', a digital library that is accessible in a unique space located at the Piata Victoriei subway station in the capital Bucharest. ... At the Vodafone digital library, those interested in the service should scan the QR code placed on the book they are interested in. Users will thus be directed to the mobile website www.bibliotecapemobil.ro, where they can download a free version of the book in pdf, epub and audio formats. ... Data traffic within the mobile web site is free until 31 October for Vodafone Romania customers. Vodafone's digital library is available to the public until 31 October [2012].

The digital library has been developed in partnership with Humanitas and local subway company Metrorex and with the support of McCann Ericsson Romania."

(Telecompaper, 22 August 2012)

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TAGS

2012 • Biblioteca digitala Vodafone • Bucharest • digital booksdigital librarydigital storefront • Editura Humanitas • Ericsson Ltd • McCann Ericsson Romania • McCann Groupmetro station • Metrorex • Piata Victoriei • QR codesretail conceptsRomaniasubway stationtechnology convergencevirtual libraryvirtual storeVodafone

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 MAY 2010

From Digital Libraries to Knowledge Commons

"Digital Libraries began as systems whose goal was to simulate the operation of traditional libraries for books and other text documents in digital form. Significant developments have been made since then, and Digital Libraries are now on their way to becoming 'Knowledge Commons'. These are pervasive systems at the centre of intellectual activity, facilitating communication and collaboration among scientists or the general public and synthesizing distributed multimedia documents, sensor data, and other information.

Digital Libraries represent the confluence of a variety of technical areas both within the field of informatics (eg data management and information retrieval), and outside it (eg library sciences and sociology). Early Digital Library efforts mostly focused on bridging some of the gaps between the constituent fields, defining `digital library functionality', and integrating solutions from each field into systems that support such functionality. These have resulted in several successful systems: researchers, educators, students and members of other communities now continuously search Digital Libraries for information as part of their daily routines, decision–making processes, or entertainment.

Most current Digital Library systems share certain characteristics. They are content–centric, motivated by the need to organize and provide access to data and information. They concentrate on storage–centric functionality, mainly offering static storage and retrieval of information. They are specialized systems, built from scratch and tailored to the particular needs and characteristics of the data and users of their target environment, with little provision for generalization. They tend to operate in isolation, limiting the opportunities for large–scale analysis and global–scale information availability. Finally, they concentrate on material that is traditionally found in libraries, mostly related to cultural heritage. Hence, despite the undisputed advantages that current Digital Library systems offer compared to the pre–1990s era, the above restrictions limit the role that Digital Libraries can play in Knowledge Societies, which will serve as important educational nuclei in the future.

Together with the general community, the DELOS Network of Excellence on Digital Libraries has initiated a long journey from current Digital Libraries towards the vision of 'Knowledge Commons'. These will be environments that will impose no conceptual, logical, physical, temporal or personal borders or barriers on content. They will be the universal knowledge repositories and communication conduits of the future, common vehicles by which everyone will access, analyse, evaluate, enhance and exchange all forms of information. They will be indispensable tools in the daily personal and professional lives of people, allowing everyone to advance their knowledge, professions and roles in society. They will be accessible at any time and from anywhere, and will offer a user–friendly, multi–modal, efficient and effective interaction and exploration environment.

Achieving this requires significant changes to be made to past development strategies, which shaped the functionality, operational environment and other aspects of Digital Libraries. Knowledge Commons will have different characteristics. They will be person–centric, motivated by needs to provide novel, sophisticated, and personalized experiences to users. They will concentrate on communication and collaboration functionality, facilitating intellectual interactions on themes that are pertinent to their contents, with storage and retrieval being only a small part of such functionality. They will remain specialized systems that will nevertheless be built on top of widely–available, industrial–strength, generic management systems, offering all typically required functionality. In general, they will be managed by globally distributed systems, through which information sources across the world will exchange and integrate their contents. Finally, they will be characterized by universality of information and application, serving all applications and comprehensively managing all forms of content."

(Yannis Ioannidis)

TAGS

access to informationcollaborationconduitconfluence • content-centric • DELOS • digital library • distributed multimedia • distributed systeminformaticsinformationinformation retrievalintegration • intellectual interactions on themes • knowledge commonsknowledge construction • knowledge repositories • knowledge society • library • library sciences • Network of Excellence on Digital Libraries • person-centric • personalised experiencepervasiverepository • retrieval • storage • storage-centric

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 MAY 2010

A naïve ontology for concepts of time and space for searching and learning

"User–oriented digital information search environments call for flexible information access interfaces that may interact with a dynamically changing searcher view in capturing a variety of media. Optimal use of conventional libraries and bibliographic databases requires a general understanding of the knowledge structure of the collection domain (Hsieh–Yee 1993; Pennanen & Vakkari 2003). Novice searchers without such understanding, however, can seek the help of librarians and intermediaries when they get lost in search processes.

Increasing numbers of digital libraries and online resources on the Internet provide potential users with opportunities to access and interact with these resources directly from offices and homes. Such trends seem to offer searchers useful information access environments for a variety of information resources. However, in such environments, novice searchers are forced to seek the information they need without the help of librarians or other intermediaries. In reality, many novice users of digital libraries do not have a general understanding of the knowledge structure of the digital collections held by these libraries. Eventually they may give up pursuing their information needs when they get lost during search processes or obtain unsatisfactory search results.

This research project seeks to find a way to overcome such limitations of existing information access interfaces developed for traditional libraries and bibliographic information services. Specifically, we explore a qualitative research method for eliciting the knowledge structure of novice searchers and patterns of its modification in their search and learn processes, and build on it a naïve ontology for time and space."

(Makiko Miwa & Noriko Kando, 2007)

Hsieh–Yee, I. (1993). Effects of search experience and subject knowledge on the search tactics of novice and experienced searchers. Journal of the American Society for Information Science, 27(3), 117–120.

Miwa, M. and Kando, N. (2007). "A naïve ontology for concepts of time and space for searching and learning" Information Research, 12(2), paper 296 [Available at http://InformationR.net/ir/12–2/paper296.html]

Pennanen, M. & Vakkari, P. (2003). Students' conceptual structure, search process and outcome while preparing a research proposal. Journal of the American Society for Information Science, 54(8), 759–770.

TAGS

2007access • bibliographic databases • bibliographycollectiondigital informationdigital librarydomain expertsflexibilityICTinformation access • information access interfaces • information in contextinformation servicesinteractionInternet • knowledge structure • library • naive ontology • novice • online resourcesontologyorderingpatternrepositoryresourcessearch • search environments • searchertaxonomyusabilityuser • user-oriented

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 NOVEMBER 2009

Mendeley: Organize, share, and discover research papers!

"Organize, share, and discover research papers! Mendeley is a research management tool for desktop & web. You can also explore research trends and connect to other academics in your discipline.

Mendeley is used at, and endorsed by, some of the world's leading research institutions. Based in London, we are funded by some of the people behind Skype, Last.fm, and Warner Music."

(Mendeley.com)

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TAGS

2007academic research • academic software • academicsbibliographydigital librarydirectoryindexLast.fmlibrary management • library software • Mendeley • reference software • research papersresearch toolresearcherSkypesoftware • Warner Music

CONTRIBUTOR

David Reid
24 NOVEMBER 2008

web-based document sharing self-publishing platform

"Scribd is a free, web–based, document sharing community and self–publishing platform that enables anyone to easily publish, distribute, share, and discover documents of all kinds. E–books, presentations, essays, academic papers, newsletters, photo albums, school work, and sheet music are just a few of the different kinds of documents you can publish and share on Scribd."

(Scribd)

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TAGS

authorshipcurationdigital library • document publishing • document sharing • Flashpaper • iPaper • knowledge collectionlibrary managementMS WordOpenIDPDFpersonal collections • personal digital library • publishingScribdself-publishingWeb 2.0

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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