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Which clippings match 'Optical Printing' keyword pg.1 of 1
10 DECEMBER 2014

Zbigniew Rybczynski: New Book

"The screen is divided into nine different squares. Each representing one place. The uniting element of all the actions is a book passed from one hand to the other. All stories run parallel, as if in realtime, yet linked in a linear way at the same time through the narrative of the action."

Fig.1 Zbigniew Rybczyński (1975). "Nowa Książka (New Book)", 35mm short film, 10:26, SMFF Se–Ma–For Lodz, Poland.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 MARCH 2014

Norman Kirk split-screen political ad for 1969 NZ general election

"This 1969 advertisement for the Labour Party emphasised the leadership qualities of Norman Kirk and sought to capitalise on a public mood for change as that turbulent decade drew to a close. It screened in full colour in cinemas and in black–and–white on television (colour TV wasn't introduced until 1973). Its striking split–screen imagery and pop–styled theme song were clearly aimed at younger voters, a potentially important audience in an election when the voting age was lowered from 21 to 20 (it would be reduced further, to 18, in 1974). It was not enough, however, to oust Keith Holyoake's National government, which had ruled for the previous nine years."

TAGS

1969advertisementAotearoa New Zealand • campaign advertising • cinematic techniqueColenso BBDO • dancing Cossacks (political TV ad) • film techniquegeneral electionintra-frame • Keith Holyoake • Labour governmentLabour Party • mood for change • National (political party) • Norman Kirk • optical printing • political advertising • Prime MinisterRobert Muldoonsplit-screenThomas Crown Affair (1968) • turbulent decade • TV commercial

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 NOVEMBER 2008

Limited Animation: Clutch Cargo (1959)

"Because of budgetary limitations and the pressure to create television animation within a tight time frame, the show was the first to use the 'Syncro–Vox' optical printing system. Syncro–Vox was invented by television cameraman, and partner in Cambria Studios, Edwin Gillette (1909–2003) as a means of superimposing real human mouths on the faces of animals for the popular 'talking animal' commercials of the 1950s. Clutch Cargo employed the Syncro–Vox technique by superimposing live–action human lips over limited–motion animation or even motionless animation cels."
(Air Cargo News)

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TAGS

1959animation • Cambria Studios • Clutch Cargo • Desert Queen • human lips • limited animationmouthoptical printingsuperimposition • Syncro-Vox • television

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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