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08 MAY 2012

Transitional Cardboard Cathedral for Christchurch

"2011年2月22日に発生したM6.3のカンタベリー地震は、街のシンボル的存在であったクライストチャーチ大聖堂にも深刻な被害をもたらした。これを受け、新たな仮設のカテドラルを設計することとなった。

現地で調達可能な紙管とコンテナーを用いて三角形の断面を形成する。オリジナルの大聖堂の平面と立面のジオメトリーを受け継ぎ、同じ長さの紙管の角度を徐々に変化させている。700人収容可能で、教会としての機能の他に、多くのイベントやコンサートとしての使用も視野に入れている。

2011年7月31日に、同地にてプレス発表が行われた。2013年2月頃の完成を目指している。

The February 2011 Christchurch earthquake (magnitude 6.3) inflicted crippling damage on the Christchurch Cathedral which was the symbol of city. In response to this situation, we were asked to design new temporary cathedral.

Paper tubes of the equal length and 20 ft containers form triangular shape. Since geometry is decided by plan and elevations of the original cathedral, there is a gradual change in each angle of paper tubes. This cathedral, which has a capacity of 700 people, can be used as an event space and a concert space.

There was a media conference in Christchurch on 31st of July, 2011. We aim to open cardboard cathedral in February, 2013."

(Shigeru Ban Architects)

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TAGS

185819th century • 2011 earthquake • 201322 February 2011 • A-frame • Anglican • Aotearoa New Zealand • architectural form • architecture designbuildingcardboard • cardboard architecture • cardboard cathedral • cathedralChristchurchchurchearthquakeearthquake reconstructionFebruary 2011 • George Gilbert Scott • honeycomb cardboard • honeycomb structureJapanese • Latimer Square • material interventionsmaterialitypaper • parishioners • permanent building • re-erected • SBA • Shigeru Ban • Shigeru Ban Architects • steel • temporarytemporary building • temporary structure • temporary structurestimbertraditional building • transitional • Transitional Cathedral • tubes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 MAY 2011

Cologne Cathedral pixelated stained glass window

"In August 2007 Gerhard Richter's new stained glass window for the south transept of Cologne Cathedral was unveiled. The original window was destroyed in World War II and had been replaced with plain glass. Inspired by Richter's 1974 painting '4096 Farben', the window consists of around 11,500 hand–blown glass squares in 72 different colours. Echoing the colours of the surrounding windows, Richter's illuminated abstraction blends a modernist aesthetic with the Gothic ecclesiastical architecture of the cathedral."

(Gerhard Richter)

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19742007 • 4096 Farben • abstractioncathedralCologne • Cologne Cathedral • colourcolour field • ecclesiastical architecture • Gerhard Richter • Germany • glass squares • gothic • hand-blown • illuminated abstraction • modernist aestheticpixel • pixelated stained glass • pixilated • randomstained glass • stained glass window • windowWorld War II

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 NOVEMBER 2007

The Seven Liberal Arts: The Trivium & The Quadrivium

"Originally the liberal arts were seven in number. They were divided into the three–fold Trivium of Grammar, Logic, and Rhetoric, and the four–fold Quadrivium of Arithmetic, Geometry, Music, and Astronomy. These words mean, respectively, a three–way and a four–way crossroads, implying that these paths of knowledge are fundamentally interconnected –– and, by extension, that all other paths can be found to intersect here, as well. The T[rivium]. was the basis of elementary education (whence we probably get the word 'trivial'): Grammar taught the craft of reading and writing; Logic, of careful reasoning; and Rhetoric, of effective communication. The Q[uadrivium]. was the basis of advanced education: Arithmetic taught the science of number; Geometry, of form; Music, of sound (and of 'harmony' in the most general sense of the word –– 'number in motion', as it was often put); Astronomy, of time (of 'form in motion'). Moreover, from the very beginning, whether openly acknowledged or carefully alluded to, each of the Quadrivial sciences was accompanied by its complementary metaphysical art. Each dealt not only with the outer structures, but also with the inner meanings of its discipline. Thus, Arithmetic included Arithmology, the understanding that numbers were not merely quantities, but also qualities (that 'two', for instance, is also 'duality, polarity'); Geometry included what is nowadays called Geomancy, the understanding (in, for example, the design of temples or cathedrals, or in the graphic arts) that the spirit and the emotions can be affected in particular ways by particular forms; Astronomy included Astrology, the divination of the meanings of cycles of time; and Music included not only the study of 'practical theory', of nomenclature and technique (e.g. 'this is a minor third', 'this is the Mixolydian mode'), but also the study of 'speculative theory', of the meanings and influences of tones and intervals and scales.

Traditionally the seven liberal arts have been positioned in opposition to the 'servile arts'. In this sense while the liberal arts generally refer to knowledge 'appropriate for free men' (social and political elites) the servile arts have been associated with specialised tradesman skills and knowledge e.g. engineering and design."
(Steven C. Rasmussen 28 March 1996)

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arithmeticastronomycathedralcraftcurriculumcycledesigneducationeducational modelemploymentengineeringEuropeangeometrygrammar • high middle ages • interconnectedliberal arts • liberalis arts • logic • medieval university • musicpremodernprofessionalismQuadriviumqualityrhetoric • scholastic guild • scienceservile arts • seven liberal arts • skills • studia generalia • studium • trade • tradesmanship • Trivium • universitas magistrorum • universitas magistrorum et scholarium • universitas scholarium • universityvocationvocational training
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