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Which clippings match 'Originality' keyword pg.1 of 2
19 MAY 2014

Defining features of practice-based and practice-led research

"Practice-based Research is an original investigation undertaken in order to gain new knowledge partly by means of practice and the outcomes of that practice. Claims of originality and contribution to knowledge may be demonstrated through creative outcomes which may include artefacts such as images, music, designs, models, digital media or other outcomes such as performances and exhibitions Whilst the significance and context of the claims are described in words, a full understanding can only be obtained with direct reference to those outcomes. A practice-based PhD is distinguishable from a conventional PhD because creative outcomes from the research process may be included in the submission for examination and the claim for an original contribution to the field are held to be demonstrated through the original creative work.

Practice-based doctoral submissions must include a substantial contextualisation of the creative work. This critical appraisal or analysis not only clarifies the basis of the claim for the originality and location of the original work, it also provides the basis for a judgement as to whether general scholarly requirements are met. This could be defined as judgement of the submission as a contribution to knowledge in the field, showing doctoral level powers of analysis and mastery of existing contextual knowledge, in a form that is accessible to and auditable by knowledgeable peers.

Practice-led Research is concerned with the nature of practice and leads to new knowledge that has operational significance for that practice. The main focus of the research is to advance knowledge about practice, or to advance knowledge within practice. In a doctoral thesis, the results of practice-led research may be fully described in text form without the inclusion of a creative outcome. The primary focus of the research is to advance knowledge about practice, or to advance knowledge within practice. Such research includes practice as an integral part of its method and often falls within the general area of action research. The doctoral theses that emerge from this type of practice related research are not the same as those that include artefacts and works as part of the submission."

(Creativity and Cognition Studios, University of Technology Sydney)

TAGS

action research • advance knowledge about practice • advance knowledge within practice • central practice element • contextual knowledge • contribution to knowledge • contribution to knowledge in the field • conventional PhD • creative artefact • creative artefacts • creative outcome • creative outcomes • creative work contextualisation • Creativity and Cognition Studios (CCS)critical analysis • critical appraisal • digital media practice • doctoral level analysis • doctoral submission • doctoral theses • doctoral thesis • exegesis • knowledge about practice • knowledgeable peers • mastery • nature of practice • new knowledge • new knowledge by means of practice • new understandings about practice • operational significance for that practice • original contribution to the field • original creative work • original investigation • original work • originalitypractice-basedpractice-based PhDspractice-based researchpractice-ledpractice-led researchresearch processresearch scholarship • research types • scholarly requirements • submission for examination • types of research • University of Technology Sydney

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 MARCH 2014

Copyright User: online resource for UK content producers

"We aim to provide answers to the most pressing concerns that creators have about copyright. To find out what was most confusing to users, we took two approaches. First, we analysed the 200 most frequently asked questions about copyright posted online by creators and consumers, and we filtered those down to the most important 20 which you can find answered in the 'FAQs' section. Second, we spoke to creators themselves. For each of the main artistic mediums we produced a video which contains interviews with creators about their artistic process, thoughts and questions about copyright."

(27 March 2014)

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TAGS

2014archives • Bartolomeo Meletti • content producercopyrightcopyright lawcopyright legislation • Copyright User (site) • Court of Justice of the European Union • creative industriescreditscriticism • current legislation • data mining • Davide Bonazzi • educationEuropean Unionfilmmakers • getting permission • interactive developers • IPR • legal access • legal issueslegal rightslegal rights holderslicensing • Marco Bagni • musiciansnews reportingonline resourceoriginalityorphan worksparodypasticheperformersplagiarismpreservation • private copying • private study • public domainre-useresearchreview • Sarc:o • text miningUK • UK Copyright Act • UK Copyright Law • visual artistsvisual plagiarismwriters

CONTRIBUTOR

Ashley Woodfall
20 DECEMBER 2013

Kirby Ferguson: Embracing the remix

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TAGS

2012Android OSAppleauthorship • behavioural finance theory • Bill BuxtonBob Dylan • borrow • Brian Burton • building on the work of others • Carter Family • celebrated creators • citation as a form of persuasioncopycopyingcopyrightcopyright law • core technology • creative workscreativitycultural productiondesign innovation • Dominic Behan • everything is a remix • good artists copy great artists steal • graphical user interfacegreat ideasHenry FordiPhone • Jean Ritchie • Jeff Han • Kirby Ferguson • loss aversion • multi-fingered gestures • multi-touch technologiesnew medianothing is original • Nottamun Town • originalityoriginality is non-existentownershipPablo Picasso • patent law • patent registration • Paul Clayton • private property • property analogy • remixremix cultureremixingrip • shameless stealing • standing on the shoulders of giants • stealing • Steve Jobs • stolen product • TED Talks • Woody Guthrie • Xerox PARC

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 AUGUST 2012

PressPausePlay: does democratised culture mean better art, film, music and literature?

"The digital revolution of the last decade has unleashed creativity and talent of people in an unprecedented way, unleashing unlimited creative opportunities.

But does democratized culture mean better art, film, music and literature or is true talent instead flooded and drowned in the vast digital ocean of mass culture? Is it cultural democracy or mediocrity?

This is the question addressed by PressPausePlay, a documentary film containing interviews with some of the world's most influential creators of the digital era."

(House of Radon)

Fig.1 "PressPausePlay" (2011) [http://www.houseofradon.com/]

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TAGS

2011 • Adam Watson • amateur cultural productionamateurism • Amy Phillips • Andre de Ridder • Andre Stringer • Andrew Keen • Anne Hilde Neset • Anthony Volodkin • Apparat • artistic process • Bill Drummond • Brenda Walker • Christopher Weingarten • consumer co-creationcreativitycultural democracy • David Girhammar • David Weinberger • democratised culturedigital eradigital revolutiondocumentary • Georgia Taglietti-Sonar • Hank Shocklee • Hillary Rosen • Hot Chip (group) • House of Radon (agency) • influential creatorsinformation wants to be freeJimi Hendrix • Jonas Woost • Katie Johnson • Keith Harris • Lena Dunham • Lykke Li • mass culturemasterymastery of toolsmediocrity • Mike Cosola • Moby • Nick Sansano • Norman Hollyn • Olafur Arnalds • originality • PressPausePlay • produserremix cultureRip Mix BurnRobyn • Robyn Carlsson • Scott Belsky • Sean Parker • Seth Godin • Shen Lihiu • Takafumi Tsuchiya • talent • Ted Schilowitz • Toby Smith • unlimited creative opportunities • Xiang Xaing • Yasuhiko Fukuzono • Zach Hancock

CONTRIBUTOR

Chris Thorby
26 JULY 2012

Spot the Difference project on visual plagiarism

"Whilst there has been extensive research and guidance on the nature and issues surrounding text–based plagiarism in Further and Higher Education, there has been relatively little research undertaken on the topic of plagiarism in non–text based media. The Spot the Difference project seeks to address this gap and to undertake research on the meaning, nature, and issues surrounding the complex and nebulous concept of 'visual plagiarism', as well as to investigate the potential uses and relevance that visual search technology may have to offer in this area."

(Leigh Garrett, VADS, University for the Creative Arts)

The project is a collaboration between the Visual Arts Data Service (VADS) at the University for the Creative Arts and the Centre for Vision, Speech, and Signal Processing (CVSSP) at the University of Surrey. The project is funded through a JISC Learning & Teaching Innovation grant from June 2011 to May 2012.

Fig.1 'Giving credit' poster by Pia Jane Bijkerk [http://www.piajanebijkerk.com/], Erin Loechner, and Yvette van Boven.

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TAGS

Amy Robinson • appropriationauthorship • Centre for Vision Speech and Signal Processing • citation as a form of persuasioncreditingcultural production • CVSSP • Erin Loechner • further education • giving credit • Harvard Referencing SystemHEhigher educationimage identificationJISC • John Collomosse • Leigh Garrett • nothing is originaloriginalityownership • Pia Jane Bijkerk • plagiarism • plagiarism in non-text based media • poster • Spot the Difference (project) • text-based plagiarism • theftthieverytransformative worksUniversity for the Creative Arts • University of Surrey • VADS • Visual Arts Data Service • visual plagiarism • visual search technology • your work • Yvette van Boven

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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