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Which clippings match 'Exposure' keyword pg.1 of 1
25 SEPTEMBER 2011

Facebook's Read, Watch, Listen media sharing apps

"The Guardian Facebook app is a way of reading and sharing Guardian content from within Facebook. If you choose to use the app, then when you follow links to the Guardian's website, you will be shown the content on a Facebook page. This enables you to see what your friends are also reading from the Guardian, and what is proving popular from the site amongst Facebook users. You will also be able to comment and discuss articles within Facebook."

(The Guardian, 22 September 2011)

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TAGS

app • automatic • cross-context sharing • discuss articles • exposureFacebookFacebook appFacebook News FeedFacebook profileinformation sharinglistenmedia sharing appsnewspaper • Read • read it • reading and sharing • see what your friends are reading • social appssocial networkingtechnological innovationThe Guardianuse of private informationWashington Postwatchwhat you are watching

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 SEPTEMBER 2011

Every click you make, Facebook tracker will be watching you

"Facebook also introduced new features aimed at marketing companies that let users monitor what their fellow members are watching and listening to online instantly. ...

'Retention of information online has always been a problem. If information comes and goes fleetingly there's less likelihood it will be used other than for the purpose you put it up, which is just to keep people in touch with what you're doing,' Mr Vaile said.

'This is in line with my concern about Facebook trying to change how people think and encourage them to normalise over–sharing and abandon any restraint on storage and use and exposure of private information.'"

(Andrew Colley, 24 September 2011, The Australian)

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TAGS

abandon restraint • autonomycommercial exploitationcommodifying myselfcommodityconductconstruction of normscontextcross-context sharing • cyber-communities • cyberspacedatadata matchingdemassificationdigital identity • digital maps • digital representation • digital signature • e-privacyethicsexposureFacebook • Facebook tracker • human interactioninformationinformation sharingmonitoringnormalisationnormalising over-sharingonlineownershippersonal informationprivacy • privacy watchdog • publicly availableretention of informationsocial networkingstoragetechnological innovation • they are watching you • timeline • Timothy Pilgrim • trackerUNSWuse of private information • use their information • what you are watching

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 NOVEMBER 2008

Viral marketing is much easier to tell stories about than to implement

"Viral marketing has generated a lot of excitement in recent years, in part because it seems like the ultimate free lunch: Pick some small number of people to 'seed' your idea, product, or message; get it to 'go viral'; and then watch while it spreads relentlessly to reach millions, all on a shoestring marketing budget.

Adding to this intuitive appeal, viral ideas, products and media also make compelling stories. 'Flash mobs', started by Bill Wasik as something between a social experiment and an art project, became popular in New York City in the summer of 2003, and then spread around the world as imitators as far afield as Asia, Europe, South America, and Australia copied Wasik's idea. Amusing videos like the 'Star Wars Kid', and entertaining or controversial websites like Jib Jab's 2004 election spoof and 'blackpeopleloveus.com' also started from small initial groups of people and ultimately attracted millions of unique visitors, often generating additional exposure from an interested mass media. And viral email forwards, like one initiated by a customer who ordered Nike shoes customized with the word 'Sweatshop', or another describing an intimate exchange between a London lawyer and his onetime girlfriend, made news headlines and generated considerably notoriety for its authors, after reaching a global audience of millions via word–of–mouth networks.

Viral marketing, however, is much easier to tell stories about than to implement. For every high profile example of a viral product, there are many more unsuccessful attempts that one never hears about. Moreover, predicting which of these attempts will succeed and which will not is extremely hard, if not impossible–even for experienced practitioners. After the fact, it is usually possible to understand what was entertaining, titillating, or otherwise intriguing about a given viral entity; but it is rarely obvious in advance. For example, in a recent 'contagious media' contest conducted by the media art nonprofit Eyebeam.org, a roomful of subject matter experts failed to predict which of 60 submitted websites would generate the most page views. Even creators of successful viral projects are rarely able to repeat their success with subsequent projects. Indeed, looking across a wide range both of successful and also unsuccessful attempts over the past several years, there is little in the way of attributes to which one might ascribe consistently viral properties. As a result, is extremely difficult, and perhaps impossible to consistently create media that will spread virally from a small seed to millions of people.

Thus as appealing as the viral model of marketing seems in theory, its practical implementation is greatly complicated by its low success rate–a problem that is exacerbated by the constraints imposed by the commercial, political, or social agendas inherent to marketing campaigns. One may need to design and conduct dozens or even hundreds of such campaigns before one of them succeeds; and even if a campaign is successful at spreading it still might not propagating the desired message of the advertiser."
(Duncan J. Watts, Jonah Peretti, and Michael Frumin)

TAGS

ig seed • Collective Dynamics Group • contagious media • exposureflash mobs • Frumin • go viral • mass mediamedia artNike • Peretti • popularityseed • Star Wars Kid • viral • viral email forwards • viral marketing • Wasik • Watts • word-of-mouseword-of-mouth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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