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Which clippings match 'Pacific' keyword pg.1 of 3
13 AUGUST 2012

O Tamaiti: young boy who is expected to play guardian to his siblings

"Sima Urale's debut short film, beautifully realised in black and white, tells the story of a young Samoan boy who is expected to play guardian to his siblings. As his parents struggle in their new country, he is overwhelmed by the responsibility. When faced with his grief, the adults fail to recognise his pain. Poignant attention to details that convey a child's perspective (eg. the movement of a spacies game and shopping trolley are intercut) saw O Tamaiti win awards at film festivals around the globe, including the prestigious Silver Lion at Venice."

(NZ On Screen)

Fig. 1 Dir. Sima Urale, 15mins, NZ, 1996, black & white, 1.1:66

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1996Aotearoa New Zealandarcade gameattention to detailAustralasiababyblack and whitechildrenchilds perspectivechurch • Coke machine • coming of age • cot death • deathdebutfamily • female filmmaker • hospitalimmigrant • Kara Paewai • kiwi short films • new baby • New Zealand • New Zealand cinemaNew Zealand on Screen • O Tamaiti • PacificPacific IslanderPolynesianpregnancySamoan • sensitive portrayal • shopping trolley • short filmsiblings • Sima Urale • socialsoundSpace InvadersspaciesThe Coming of Age of The New Zealand Short Filmyoung boy

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 JANUARY 2011

Te Ara Encyclopedia of New Zealand

"What is Te Ara? 'Te ara' in Māori means 'the pathway'. Te Ara – The Encyclopedia of New Zealand offers many pathways to understanding New Zealand. When complete, it will be a comprehensive guide to the country's peoples, natural economy, institutions and society. ...

An important feature of Te Ara is its Māori content. The Māori perspective is presented with each theme, and entries with substantial Māori content are available in the Māori language."

(Aotearoa New Zealand, Ministry for Culture and Heritage)

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Aotearoa New ZealandAucklandcatalogueChristchurchCommonwealthcultural heritageDunedinencyclopaediaheritagehistoryIndigenousLand WarsMaori • Ministry for Culture and Heritage • national cultural heritage onlineOtagoPacificPakehasocietySouth Island • Te Ara • Te Tiriti o Waitangi • the pathway • Treaty of WaitangiWellington

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 APRIL 2010

Flagging interest in Nation Branding and National Identity?

"We are a changing, emerging state that no longer seeks inspiration from the present flag. It is part of our history and the role that it has played can be respected. We are moving from a predominantly bicultural society to one that now involves an important component of Pacific island people and also immigrants from Asia.

We must now seek inspiration, visual excitement and stimulus to creativity and excellence from many directions and develop a flag that can be a source of pride to New Zealanders as we continue to impact strongly on the wider world in the many areas of commerce, sport, films, literature, tourism and creative thinking in which we have to strive to excel."

(Ian Prior, 27 February 2004)

Fig.1 New Zealand National flag and state ensign; Fig.2 Michael Smythe, 'Koru (after Gordon Walters)'; Fig.3 Cameron Sanders; Fig.4 'Tino Rangatiratanga'; Fig.5 Kyle Lockwood.

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2004Aotearoa New ZealandAsia-Pacificautonomy • biculturalism • brand development • brand recognitionBritish Empirechange of imageCommonwealthconstitution • creation of a brand • defaced Blue Ensign • distinguishing featuresflag • Gordon Walters • historyidentityindependenceIndigenous • koru • Koru Flag • Maori • Michael Smythe • motifnation brandingnational identity • NZFlag.com Trust • PacificPakehaplace brandingpostcolonial • Southern Cross • sovereigntysymbol • Tino Rangatiratanga • vexillologyvisual identity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 FEBRUARY 2010

The Maori Origin Myth

"The [Aotearoa New Zealand] Maori origin myth describes a world of darkness locked in the unyielding embrace of Ranganui, the Sky Father, and Papatuanuku, the Earth Mother with all their children (sea, forest, land, mountains, wind and rain) trapped between them. This inertia was shattered by Tane Mahuta, god of the forest, when he forcefully separated Papa and Rangi, thus liberating his siblings as well as their future descendants, freeing the light, and catalyzing the procreation of all life forms. Processes of differentiation and proliferation were then set in motion bound by mauri, the life force, imparting character (so that birds are birds and fish are fish), and uniting the physical and spiritual."

(Suzanne MacAulay, 'Field Aesthetics', Gathering/Place: Folklore, Aesthetic Ecologies, and the Public Domain)

Fig.1. Chris Matatahi & Peter Plumb. 'Maui's Dwelling Place', 1 metre tall. The whalebone is 79 cm long and 40 cm wide at the furthest points. The greenstone face is 21 cm tall and 13 cm wide at their furthest points. The base is NZ kauri wood and greenstone. Three paua pearls are inlaid in the upper area of the whalebone.

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2004Aotearoa New Zealandbirdscarving • Chris Matatahi • creation narrativeearth motherethnographyfish • folklife • folkloregodIndigenouskauri • life force • Maori • Maui • mauri • origin mythPacific • Papa • Papatuanuku • Peter Plumb • pounamu • Ranganui • Rangi • Sky Father • sperm whalebone • spiritual • Tane Mahuta • University of Pennsylvania

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JANUARY 2010

NativeWeb: fostering communication among Indigenous peoples

"NativeWeb is a project of many people. Our vision touches ancient teachings and modern technology. Our purpose: to provide a cyber–place for Earth's indigenous peoples.

As access to the Web grows and indigenous peoples reach out through cyber–space, NativeWeb will grow also. Through NativeWeb, indigenous people (and peoples) become visible to each other and themselves and organize actions in a multitude of local, national, and international institutions. The shape of indigenous social action changes as wider audiences are created and especially as the means of creating audiences become the means by which audiences become actors. From Chiapas to Nunavut and from Samiland to Thailand, indigenous communities widen, coalesce, and interact as they work, communicate, and organize via the Internet.

Indigenous Peoples have much in common amidst great diversity: spiritual practices celebrating inter–relatedness of all Life on Earth; and historical suffering at the hands of industrialized nations and corporate entities. NativeWeb is concerned with all this: indigenous literature and art, legal and economic issues, land claims and new ventures in self–determination.

Our purpose is not to 'preserve,' in museum fashion, some vestige of the past, but to foster communication among peoples engaged in the present and looking toward a sustainable future for those yet unborn."

(NativeWeb, Inc.)

Fig.1 Sami people from Finland (http://www.flickr.com/photos/helga_ni/)

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AboriginalAotearoa New Zealand • Austronesian • Chiapas • engagementFinlandidentityIndigenousIndigenous people • industrialised nations • Maori • NativeWeb • Nunavut • PacificPacific Rimpastpostcolonialpreservation • Sami people • Samiland • self-determinationsocial actionspiritual practicessustainable futureThailand

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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