Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Programmatic Space' keyword pg.1 of 1
24 FEBRUARY 2012

Adrift in a shopping maze: it's a successful no-exit strategy

"Alan Penn, director of the Virtual Reality Centre for the Built Environment at University College London, has come to a conclusion that Ikea stores are 'designed just like a maze'. In doing so he's given scholarly validation to a feeling that will have occurred to many shoppers as they blunder around the blue and yellow hangar looking for a new TV unit only to emerge with two candles, a wok and a bottle of lingonberry cordial.

Penn went on to suggest that it was Ikea's strategy to keep customers inside the store for the maximum time possible. They achieve this by setting a route round the store from which it's difficult to deviate. Taking the shortcuts (which are only there to conform with fire regulations) often leaves you adrift in a sea of lampshades.

The effect is to boost impulse purchases. See a coathanger, and you might buy 'because the layout is so confusing you know you won't be able to go back and get it later'."

(Ian Tucker, 30 January 2011, The Observer, Guardian News and Media Limited)

1
2

TAGS

a sea of lampshades • adrift • Alan Penn • circulation • coathanger • cognitive map • confusing • customersdesigndirectional information • floor plan • IKEA • Ikea stores • impulse buy • impulse purchase • layout • maze • mental imagenavigationno escape • no-exit • organising spacesprogrammatic spaceroutesensemakingsequence of spacesshopping experiencespatial designspatial literacyspatial narrative • spatial sequence • store • store designtrappedUniversity College Londonuser experience design (UX) • Virtual Reality Centre for the Built Environment • wayfindingyou are here

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 MARCH 2011

From Urban Experiences to Architectural Narratives

"Cities are a densely coded context for narratives of discovery and the recovery of experience. They have a capacity to act as condensers of information and to integrate assimilations of behaviours, people, styles, typologies, forms, ideas. Cities are comprehended through spatial practices. Movement in the city is a major practice which enables us to accumulate and organize urban experiences. It creates spatial narratives containing memories and views, specific places, objects, beginnings and ends, distances, shadows, buildings or parts of them, encounters, signs and panoramas. Urban space becomes intelligible through sequences of movement. Its complexity, mystery, splendour, rhythm, are revealed and interrelated through the route of the urban dweller. Similarly to urban space, architectural space is perceived in terms of sequences and spatial practises. According to Jean Nouvel 'To erect a building is to predict and seek effects of contrasts and linkage through which one passes...in the continuous sequence that a building is...the architect works with cuts and edits, framings and openings...screens, planes legible from obligatory points of passage'."

(Vaso Trova)

Vaso Trova (2008). 24th NCBDS: 'We Have Never Been Pre–Disciplinary', Georgia Institute of Technology. Sabir Khan, Chair.

1

TAGS

architectural narratives • architectural spacearchitecturebehaviourcitiesdwellingencountersexperienceframe • Jean Nouvel • legibility • linkage • memorymovementnarratives of discovery • NCBDS • place • points of passage • programmatic spacerhythmsequence of spacessequences and spatial practises • sequences of movement • spacespatial configurationspatial literacyspatial narrativesspatial practices • typologies • urban • urban dweller • urban experiences • urban spaceurbanism

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JUNE 2010

The Open City: The Closed System and The Brittle City

"The idea of an open city is not my own: credit for it belongs to the great urbanist Jane Jacobs in the course of arguing against the urban vision of Le Corbusier. She tried to understand what results when places become both dense and diverse, as in packed streets or squares, their functions both public and private; out of such conditions comes the unexpected encounter, the chance discovery, the innovation. Her view, reflected in the bon mot of William Empson, was that 'the arts result from over–crowding'. Jacobs sought to define particular strategies for urban development, once a city is freed of the constraints of either equilibrium or integration. These include encouraging quirky, jerry–built adaptations or additions to existing buildings; encouraging uses of public spaces which don't fit neatly together, such as putting an AIDS hospice square in the middle of a shopping street. In her view, big capitalism and powerful developers tend to favour homogeneity: determinate, predictable, and balanced in form. The role of the radical planner therefore is to champion dissonance. In her famous declaration: 'if density and diversity give life, the life they breed is disorderly'. The open city feels like Naples, the closed city feels like Frankfurt."

(Richard Sennett, 2006)

Fig.1 Busy street in Naples, marlenworld.com
Fig.2 Paris, Les Olympiades, 1969–1974, Thierry Bézecourt in 2005
[3] Sennett, R. (2006). The Open City: The Closed System and The Brittle City. Urban Age.

1

2

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 SEPTEMBER 2008

Reebok World Headquarters: imposing architectural narrative

"The new building rises four storeys high to present a new sports arena–style façade. The space plan is based around a central spine, from which there are views onto an indoor basketball court and a running track that enters the building through a glass tunnel from outside. 'It's changed the way people wake up in the morning and think of the business. It's a catalyst for change,' says Reebok CEO Paul Fireman. 'You're living the experience.'"

(Jeremy Myerson, UK Design Council)

[The project centres on an imposing fixed architectural corporate narrative.]

1

3

TAGS

architectural narrative • corporate narrative • Paul Fireman • programmatic space • Reebok World Headquarters • running track • spacespatial literacyspatial narrativesport • sports arena

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.