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25 APRIL 2011

Fantastic Planet: political allegory of human regression and rebirth

"A winner of the Cannes Film Festival 1973, 'Fantastic Planet' is a full length animated fantasy set on the planet of the Draags in a far–off solar system where humans are kept as pets by a race of huge blue creatures."

(Alice in Videoland)

Fig.1–8 René Laloux and Roland Topor (1973). 'Fantastic Planet/La Planète Sauvage'. France: 72 mins.

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TAGS

1973alienalien raceallegoryanimationattackbluebraceletCannes Film FestivalchildrencollarcommunicationCzechoslovakiadomesticated • Draags • drawingexodusextermination • Fantastic Planet • fantasyfilm • fragile • fragilityFrancefuturehumanhumanoidimaginary worlds • Jiri Trnka Studio • knowledge • La Planete Sauvage • lethal • master and slave • meditationnew technology • Oms • Oms en serie • peacepetplanetpolitical allegorypost-apocalyptic scenariorebirthregression • Rene Laloux • reversal of fortune • Roland Topor • savage • scalescience fictionsocietyspeculative fictionspiritsstatue • Stefan Wul • stop framesymbolism • Terr • Tiva • tribevisual design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JANUARY 2011

Foli: there is no movement without rhythm

"dedicated to the people of Baro.

Life has a rhythm, it's constantly moving. The word for rhythm (used by the Malinke tribes) is Foli. It is a word that encompasses so much more than drumming, dancing or sound. It's found in every part of daily life. In this film you not only hear and feel rhythm but you see it. It's an extraordinary blend of image and sound that feeds the senses and reminds us all –how essential it is.

By the brothers Thomas Roebers en Floris Leeuwenberg. Film crew during one month in Baro, Guinee Afrika. Beutifull sound recording and sound design Bjorn Warning. Translator and Rhythm specialist Thomas Bonenkamp. With special thanks to the chief: DJEMBEFOLA |: Mansa Camio"

(Thomas Roebers and Floris Leeuwenberg, 2010)

[An 11–minute documentary that uses rhythm: both musical and spoken, as its central linking device.]

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TAGS

2010Africa • Baro • beatcompositioncultural identitycultural practicecultural studiesculture • customary practices • customsdaily lifedancediegeticdiegetic sounddocumentarydrummingediting • Floris Leeuwenberg • Foli • Guinea-Conakry • Malinke • musicpattern • Republic of Guinea • rhythm • rhythmic daily life • sequence designsoundspectacle • Thomas Roebers • traditiontraditional practicestribevillage

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 JANUARY 2010

Rongomaraeroa: contemporary design to tell traditional stories

"Rongomaraeroa, Te Papa's Marae, is the creation of master carver Cliff Whiting and the Māori advisory group to Te Papa, Ngā Kaiwawao, who came up with the concept to develop a fully functional marae, which would embrace the concept of mana taonga and the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi. The official opening was on 30 November 1997. ...

New Zealand's other cultures are represented along the back wall of the meeting house, and the changing relationship between Māori and Pākehā is portrayed inside the cupboards housed in the poutokomanawa (the central heart post of the meeting house)."

(Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa)

[A contemporary design built upon traditional cultural values.]

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TAGS

1997Aotearoa New Zealandcarving • Cliff Whiting • community • contemporary • craftcultural valuesdesign artefactidentityIndigenousMaorimaraeMDF • meeting house • museummuseum of contemporary cultureMuseum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa • Nga Kaiwawao • Pakeha • poutokomanawa • Rongomaraeroa • storyTe Papa TongarewaTe Tiriti o Waitangitradition • traditional stories • Treaty of WaitangitribeWellington • wharenui • wood

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 DECEMBER 2008

New Zealand did not have its own constitutional government until 1853

"New Zealand did not have its own constitutional government until 1853, when the Imperial Parliament's New Zealand Constitution Act 1852 was implemented. Until that time, New Zealand was a Crown colony. The power vested in the Crown by the various Acts of Parliament relating to New Zealand was in turn vested in the governor. The colonial secretary issued him with instructions as to how this authority was to be exercised. In a colony with only one governor, none of the executive powers were delegated. He could take advice from subordinates but nothing could be done without his authority. In theory once lieutenant–governors were appointed, as in New Zealand after 1846, they would conduct the administration of their provinces, and certain executive powers would be delegated to them under the supervision of the governor–in–chief.

New Zealand was initially under the adminstration of the New South Wales governor, Sir George Gipps. On 3 May 1841 the country became a Crown colony in its own right and Hobson was elevated from lieutenant–governor to governor. Hobson died on 10 September 1842 after a series of illnesses which left many of his duties to his few officials. His replacement was Captain Robert FitzRoy, governor from 26 December 1843 until 17 November 1845. It was during his term of office that the Otakou purchase was negotiated. The Hobson and FitzRoy administrations were periods of considerable economic and political difficulty. Government was severely under–resourced and under–funded. Tensions between Maori and settlers, and between both races and the Crown remained unresolved. With the appointment of Captain George Grey, backed by Imperial troops and much stronger financial support, the Crown was able to take the initiative."

(The Ngāi Tahu Report 1991, Section 5.2.1, Waitangi Tribunal, Department of Justice, Wellington)

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TAGS

1853 • Aotearoa New ZealandAustraliaCommonwealthconstitution • Crown colony • George Gipps • George Grey • governor • IndigenousMaoriNew South Wales • Ngāi Tahu • NSWOtago • Otakou • race • Robert FitzRoy • settlementSouth IslandTe Tiriti o WaitangitreatyTreaty of WaitangitribevaluesWilliam Hobson

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 DECEMBER 2008

Understanding the social relations operating within Indigenous communities key to economic development

"Regulation theory has emerged from the conflict between the modernisation and dependency perspectives discussed by Anderson (2002) and Anderson et al. (2005). Regulation theory emphasises the importance of economic and extra–economic institutions in economic development (Skrypietz, 2003), with the accumulation of capital being influenced by state and non–state institutions, and interactions between agents within the economic system (Dana, 2005). Value is placed not only on the economic aspects, but also on understanding the social relations and interactions within industrial economies. The objective of this approach is to develop diverse strategies that are suited to respective societal structure and consequently lead to a maximising of economic development for both distinctive economies as well as the general economy. The modes of development that emerge can reflect the history, values and cultural aspects, and the objectives of the people involved (Anderson, 2002). This suggests that the objective of Maoris, and indeed all indigenous groups, is to develop a diverse range of strategies suited to the unique characteristics of their economy as well as the cultural aspects in which they live, to achieve maximum results not only for themselves but for the economy as a whole."
(Stephen Buckingham and Leo Paul Dana, pp. 178–187, 178 Int. J. Entrepreneurship and Small Business, Vol. 2, No. 2, 2005)

Anderson, R. (2002) 'Entrepreneurship and aboriginal Canadians: a case study in economic
development', Journal of Developmental Entrepreneurship, Vol. 7, No. 1, pp.45–65.

Anderson, R.B., Camp II, R., Dana, L.P., Honig, B., Nkongolo–Bakenda, J–M. and Peredo, A.M.
(2005) 'Indigenous land rights in Canada: the foundation for development?',
Int. J. Entrepreneurship and Small Business, Vol. 2, No. 2, pp.104–133.

Skrypietz, I. (2003) 'Regulation theory and the crisis of capitalism', Book review, Capital and
Class, Spring.

Dana, L.P. (2005) When Economies Change Hands: A Survey of Entrepreneurship in the Emerging
Markets of Europe from the Balkans to the Baltic States, International Business Press,
Binghamton.

TAGS

agencyagreementAotearoa New Zealandautonomyculture • dependency • economic developmententrepreneurship • grievance • IndigenousiwilandMaorimodernisationregulation • regulation theory • settlementsocial changesocietysocio-economicSouth IslandTe Tiriti o WaitangitransformationTreaty of Waitangitribevalues

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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