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Which clippings match 'Aboriginal Culture' keyword pg.1 of 1
19 JANUARY 2016

Skins: Designing Games with First Nations Youth

"Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace (AbTeC), based out of Obx Labs at Concordia University in Montreal and directed by Lewis and Skawennati Fragnito, is a network of academics, artists, and technologists that encourages Indigenous participation in online culture and exploration of new media technology. The main objective of the AbTeC research network is to discover, define, and implement methods by which Indigenous people can use networked communication technology to strengthen our cultures. In an effort to overcome the economic, social, and cultural factors that influence the low rate of Indigenous participation in the making of new media and encourage Indigenous representation in digital games and virtual worlds specifically, AbTeC proposed to conduct Skins, a game/virtual world development workshop for Aboriginal youth that teaches them design programming, art, animation, and audio. ...

In conducting Skins, our goal is to encourage First Nations youth to be more than consumers of digital media; rather, we wish to show them how they themselves can be creators who can approach games with a critical perspective and from within their own cultural context. We are motivated by the possibilities of digital games and virtual environments for Indigenous peoples as well as correcting or adding to representations of Indigenous peoples in commercial games. Indigenous peoples' survival, recovery, development, and self-determination hinges on the preservation and revitalization of languages, social and spiritual practices, social relations, and arts [1]. Digital games and virtual environments, with their unique combination of story, design, code, architecture, art, animation, and sound [2], provide a rich medium though which to explore different strategies for pursuing such preservation and revitalization. For example, Thornton Media's RezWorld is a virtual environment for learning the Cherokee language. It has even been argued that the fluid, open, and networked characteristics of modern digital media make it particularly useful as a tool for Aboriginal storytelling, with Loretta Todd, Cree/Métis filmmaker and Director of the Aboriginal Media Arts Lab, suggesting 'the experience of cyberspace offers the reversal of narrative as derived from storytelling, a return to oral tradition' [3]. Furthermore, due to the radical decrease in the costs of the means of production and distribution, digital games and virtual worlds present Indigenous people with a powerful opportunity to widely (or narrowly) communicate stories in which we shape our own representation."

(Beth Aileen Lameman and Jason Edward Lewis, 2011)

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TAGS

2011Aboriginal culture • Aboriginal Media Arts Lab • Aboriginal storytelling • Aboriginal Territories in Cyberspace (AbTeC) • Aboriginal youth • Bart Simon • Beth Aileen Lameman • CanadaCelia Pearce • Cherokee language • Christian Beauclair • community participatory project • Concordia University • Cree • cultural representations • development workshop • digital games • digital media and learning • Dogrib • First NationsFirst Nations youth • Haudenosaunee • Indigenous cultural production • Indigenous participation • Indigenous peopleindigenous peoples • Indigenous representation in digital games • Indigenous representation in virtual worlds • Iroquois • Jason Edward Lewis • Journal of Game Design and Development Education • Katherine Isbister • Ken Finney • language preservation • Loretta Todd • Louise Profeit • making new media • Metis • Mohawk • Montreal • more than consumers • Myron Lameman • Nacho Nyak Dun • Nehiraw • new media artist • new media technologiesNorth American • Obx Labs at Concordia University • oral traditionresearch network • revitalisation of languages • RezWorld • Richard Van Camp • self-determination • Skawennati Fragnito • spiritual practices • Steve Loft • Steve Sanderson • Thornton Media • traditional culturevideo game designvideo games and Indigenous peoplevirtual environmentsvirtual worlds

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 JANUARY 2016

Love Punks: online game created by Australian Indigenous kids

"The Love Punks online game was created by a gang of 9,10 and 11 year old Love Punks from Roebourne in WA. For the last 8 months the Love Punks have been sweating it out, in 40 degree heat, on computers creating stop motion animations of themselves and friends in photoshop and flash."

(26 April 2012)

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TAGS

2012 • 9-11 year olds • Aboriginal Australian kids • Aboriginal culture • Aboriginal kids • Adobe Flash • bearded dragon • Big hART • Burrup Peninsula • childhood imagination • Chynna Campbell • comic bookcommunity participatory projectcreative participationdesert • designers of the future • disadvantaged communitiesDIY • Duncan Gates • First Nations youthfroggame designgreen screenhomemade gamesimagineeringIndigenous Australiansindigenous community • indigenous games and play • Indigenous people • Indigenous young people • interactive comic • kids • lizard • Lovepunks Game • mining • mud flats • Murujuga • NEOMAD • online game • outdoor game • peacockpersonal empowerment • Pilbara desert • pogona • remote communities • Roebourne • salt flats • Satellite Sisters • sea • social arts • stop motion animationstop-frame animation • Stu Campbell • Telen Rodwell • Trevor Jamieson • video gamevideo games and Indigenous peopleWestern Australia • Woodside (natural gas company) • Yijala Yala Project • young designersyoung peoplezombie

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 JANUARY 2009

Digital Songlines project

"Launched by the Australasian CRC [Cooperative Research Centre] for Interaction Design (ACID), Digital Songlines is a project to develop protocols, methodologies, and toolkits to facilitate the collection and sharing of Indigenous cultural heritage knowledge in Australia. The title of Digital Songlines represents the blend of new media technology, simulation technology, and high–end computer visualisation systems to depict Aboriginal culture and heritage. Through the virtual sharing of oral histories, herbarium data, dreamtime myths, legends, and stories, organisers hope to protect, preserve and promote Indigenous cultural practices and their survival techniques in accessible, interactive, creative ways."

(Ethnos Project Resources Database)

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TAGS

20063DAboriginal culture • Aboriginal heritage • Aboriginal mythologyancient heritageartworksAustralasian CRC for Interaction DesignAustralia • Brendan Ledwich • Brett Leavy • Craig Gibbons • cultural heritage • culturally sensitive • culture preservation • dancedigital environmentDigital Songlines (2006)digital storytelling • Ethnos Project Resources Database • flora and faunafood gathering activitiesIndigenous AustraliansIndigenous communitiesIndigenous cultural knowledge • Indigenous custodians • Indigenous heritage • Indigenous knowledge • Indigenous leaders • Indigenous people • Indigenous practices and languages • Indigenous traditional • interactive immersive simulation experienceinteractive visualisation • James Hills • Joti Carroll • multilayered stories • nonlinearoral historiesoral tradition • platform-independent software • ritualsonglinesstories • storytellers • Theodor Wyeld • toolkitvirtual environmentvirtual reality

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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