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Which clippings match 'Not-for-profit' keyword pg.2 of 2
11 MAY 2011

Video Data Bank: video art by and about contemporary artists

"Founded in 1976 at the inception of the media arts movement, the Video Data Bank (VDB) is a leading resource in the United States for video art by and about contemporary artists. A not–for–profit organization located at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, the VDB Collections include the work of more than 550 artists and 6,000 video art titles, 2,500+ in active distribution.

The VDB makes its Collections available to museums, galleries, educational institutions, libraries, cultural institutions and exhibitors through a national and international distribution service, and works to foster a deeper understanding of video art, and to broaden access and exposure to media art histories, through its programs and activities. These include: preservation of historically important works of video art; the perpetuation of analog and digital archives; publishing of curated programs and artists' monographs; the commissioning of essays and texts that contextualize artists' work; and an extensive range of public programs.

The VDB is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts, which believes that a great nation deserves great art, and the Illinois Arts Council, an agency of the state."

(Video Data Bank, School of the Art Institute of Chicago)

Fig.1 Videofreex (1970) 'Women's Lib Demonstration NYC', 00:23:30, United States, English, B&W, Mono, 4:3

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TAGS

1976archivesartavant-gardecollectionscontemporary artistsfilm archive • Illinois Arts Council • librarymedia art • media arts movement • National Endowment for the Arts • not-for-profitresourceSchool of the Art Institute of Chicago • VDB • video artVideo Data Bank

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 APRIL 2011

The Digital Preservation Coalition: securing the preservation of digital resources in the UK

"The Digital Preservation Coalition was established in 2001 to foster joint action to address the urgent challenges of securing the preservation of digital resources in the UK and to work with others internationally to secure our global digital memory and knowledge base. Established as a not–for–profit membership organisation the coalition provides a mechanism by which members can work together to realise the opportunities of long term access."

(Digital Preservation Coalition)

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TAGS

2001accessarchivingbrokercultural collecting organisationscultural heritagecultural heritage collectionsdigitaldigital artefactsdigital assetsdigital formatdigital heritage • digital memory • digital preservation • Digital Preservation Coalition • digital resources • DPC • global digital memory • knowledge basemedia artmedia pastnew medianot-for-profitobsolescenceold mediaorganisationpreservation • preservation of digital resources • preserving the pasttechnologyUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 JUNE 2010

Interaction Design Association (IxDA)

"We believe that the human condition is increasingly challenged by poor experiences. IxDA intends to improve the human condition by advancing the discipline of Interaction Design. To do this, we foster a community of people that choose to come together to support this intention. IxDA relies on individual initiative, contribution, sharing and self–organization as the primary means for us to achieve our goals.

IxDA is a novel kind of 'un–organization' in that there is no cost for membership. IxDA relies on its passionate members to help serve the needs of the international Interaction Design community. With more than 15,000 members and over 80 local groups around the world, the IxDA network actively focuses on interaction design issues for the practitioner, no matter their level of experience.

IxDA was founded in 2003 and incorporated as a not–for–profit in late 2005."

(Interaction Design Association)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 NOVEMBER 2008

Social productivity: using Google Apps for your social media listening dashboard

"I've been thinking a lot about the concept of social productivity as it relates to using social media and chewing on a post that Chris Brogan wrote a few days ago called "You Can Do Your Job Without Twitter." I keep thinking there has to be a sweet spot between social productivity and personal productivity.

Marnie Webb left a comment about this in a nonprofit context. There are many tasks in a nonprofit day–to–day life – like grant writing, hiring someone, or prepping a board meeting where personal productivity matters most – connectedness really doesn't play a factor in getting these tasks off the to do list. She goes on to say that there are other activities that really require moving a network – and social productivity.

So, the real question is – if you have both of these types of tasks to accomplish– they take different approaches, probably use different sides of your brain, etc. How do you organize your productivity tools effectively?"

(Beth Kanter)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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