Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Iterative' keyword pg.1 of 1
16 FEBRUARY 2018

From cause to relation

"For the occidental tradition, the idea of God is intimately related to the idea of causality. That means that for any chain of facts it is reasonable to postulate an absolute beginning, which can be called 'God'. Nevertheless, if instead of explaining the universe through the principle of causality we decide to refer to the pure idea of a 'form' -as one can speak of 'rhetorical (or mathematical) forms'-, the chain ceases to be factual and becomes structural and iterative, like a grammar, and there is no longer any way to avoid the possibility of denying a 'real' beginning. The entities in the world become figures in a diagram, the ontological 'history' becomes a rhetorical 'texture' (trama), and God (written with upper initial) may always 'be moved' by some other 'god' (with lower initial), and so on, following a never ending texture 'of dust, and time, and dream and agonies'".

(Ivan Almeida, Cristina Parodi, 1996)

Almeida, I. and C. Parodi (1996). "Borges and the Ontology of Tropes." Variaciones Borges(2).



1996 • absolute beginning • bringing into relationcausality • chain of facts • Cristina Parodi • entities • explaining the universe • factuality • figures in a diagram • formgodhistory of ideasiterative • Ivan Almeida • Jorge Luis Borges • network model of relations • network morphology • occidental • ontological history • principle of causality • real beginning • relational model • relational view • rhetorical forms • rhetorical texture • structural logic • trama • Variaciones Borges


Simon Perkins
06 NOVEMBER 2008

The Waterfall Versus Whirlpool Project Management Methods

"'Whirlpool' projects embrace the fact that requirements are volatile. Instead of trying to deliver a system that satisfies 100% of the requirements in one go, the focus is on delivering an agreed subset of the requirements at intervals. Use cases are the building blocks of requirements and provide a convenient basis for risk assessment and prioritising. The riskiest and most significant use cases are tackled first, within the context of a clearly understood architectural vision. Tackling risk early identifies problems before they become too expensive or threatening, and helps lead to more stable architectures. The system evolves as a sequence of increments, each one an enhancement to the already–delivered functionality.

The development process for each increment is founded on the idea of a workflow, consisting of activities. For example. instead of having an analysis stage followed by a design stage, a worker might be engaged in analysis activities and design activities, depending on the job in hand. It is important to recognise that analysis activities focus on the problem space, while design activities focus on the solution space. A good understanding of one part of the problem may well lead to faster progress to design in that area. It is also possible that design activities highlight shortcoming in the analysis or even the requirements, in which case these are amended to reflect the newer (and hopefully better) understanding.

Successive iterations converge on a more complete, correct and consistent model, leading ultimately to implementation and delivery."



Simon Perkins

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