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02 NOVEMBER 2015

Hakanaï dance performance 2013

"Hakanaï is a solo choreographic performance that unfolds through a series of images in motion. In Japanese Hakanaï denotes that which is temporary and fragile, evanescent and transient, and in this case something set between dreams and reality. While widely associated with nature, the term is now often used to elicit an intangible aspect of the human condition and its precariousness. It encompasses two elements: that concerning the human being as well as that related to dreams. This symbolic relationship is the foundation of the dance composition in which a dancer gives life to a space somewhere between the borders of imagination and reality, through her interactions with the images she encounters. The images are on-stage animations that move in physical patterns according to the rhythm of the live sounds that they follow. The performance's outcome is the revelation of a digital installation to its audience."

Fig.1 Composed and Directed by Adrien Mondot & Claire Bardainne; Dance (alternating) Akiko Kajihara, Satchie Noro, Virginie Barjonet, Francesca Ziviani; Digital Interpretation (alternating); Adrien Mondot, Claire Bardainne, Jérémy Chartier, Loïs Drouglazet; Sound Design; Christophe Sartori, Loïs Drouglazet, Pierre Xucla; Sound Interpretation Christophe Sartori, Loïs Drouglazet, Jérémy Chartier, Pierre Xucla; Set Design Martin Gautron, Vincent Perreux; Digital Toolset Loïs Drouglazet; Light Design Jérémy Chartier; Outside Viewer Charlotte Farcet; Costume Design Johanna Elaouf; Technical Director Alexis Bergeron; Administrator Marek Vuiton; Booking Charlotte Auché; Production assistant Margaux Létang; Produced by; Adrien M / Claire B; Co-productions, Funding & Support; Les Subsistances, Lyon / Centre Pompidou-Metz; La Ferme du Buisson, Scène nationale de Marne-la-Vallée, Noisiel / Hexagone Scène Nationale Arts Sciences – Meylan / Les Champs Libres, Rennes / Centre des Arts, Enghien-les-Bains / Maison de la Culture de Nevers et de la Nièvre / City of Lille / DICRéAM; The Adrien M / Claire B Company is accredited by DRAC Rhône-Alpes, Rhône-Alpes Region and is supported by the City of Lyon.

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TAGS

2013 • Adrien Mondot • Akiko Kajihara • Alexis Bergeron • algorithmic composition • algorithmic pattern • art and technology • artistic duo • between dream and reality • black and white • Charlotte Farcet • choreographic performance • Christophe Sartori • Claire Bardainne • computational artscube • dance composition • dance performancedesign formalism • digital backdrop • digital interpretation • digital puppetry • evanescence • fragilityFrancesca Zivianigenerative designgeometric pattern • Hakanai (2013) • immersive worksinteractive installation • Jeremy Chartier • Johanna Elaouf • light projection • Lois Drouglazet • Margaux Letang • Martin Gautron • movement performance • performance installation • Pierre Xucla • projection mappingpuppetryrhythm • Satchie Noro • sensors • snowflake • solo choreographic performance • solo performance • spider web • symbolic relationship • synapsetemporarytransiencetransitory movementtranslucence • translucent veils • Vincent Perreux • Virginie Barjonet • visual journey

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 MARCH 2012

Shadow puppetry matches dreamlike quality of Kate Bush song

"50 Word's for Snow found the elusive Kate Bush at her most stark and stripped–down. The album was the aural equivalent of a single line of footsteps in a snowy pasture. It's no wonder then that Bush, who has always been skilled at pairing her music with their equivalent visuals, turned away from her trademark cinematics for the video of her song, 'Lake Tahoe.'

In the album version of 'Lake Tahoe,' only quiet strings and a piano accompany Bush as she weaves a tale of an old dog dreaming of his owner. And while the full song explains the animal's true situation, Bush – who directed the video herself – has trimmed it down into a more ambiguous excerpt here.

Her use of shadow puppetry matches song's dreamlike quality. The stark contrast between the black figures and the white world makes each set piece seem mystical. The dog runs through phantasmagorical lands filled with spooky woods, looking for his owner. It's beautiful in its simplicity – emphasizing small subtle movements over big extravagance. The elegant design of the puppets mixes fantasy elements like the moving trees with realistic pieces such as the soft sway of the woman's hair."

(Dan Raby, 24 January 2012, All Songs Considered Blog, National Public Radio)

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2012 • 50 • 50 Words for Snow • aestheticsblack and whitedesigndioramadogdreamlike quality • Eider Falls at Lake Tahoe • elegant designfantasyfantasy elements • graphic • hair • Kate Bush • Lake Tahoe • monochromatic • moving trees • music video • National Public Radio • NPRphantasmagoriaphantasmagoricalpuppetpuppetry • Robert Allsopp • shadowshadow puppetshallow focussimplicityspooky woodsstripped-down • subtle movements • tale • visual designvisual spectaclevisual storyvisual style

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 OCTOBER 2011

Laban Movement Analysis: qualitative aspects of nonverbal behaviour

"Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) originated in the work of Rudolf Laban, and has evolved into a highly detailed practical system that describes qualitative aspects of nonverbal behavior. In its current development, it operates as a phenomenology of movement and mind, as it requires that the observer look at the movement itself, prior to interpretation and without prejudice, while acknowledging the intrinsic connection between movement and subjective experience. Movement Analysis increases kinesthetic sensitivity for the observer, because it places in the foreground of the observer's experience, those aspects of movement which are individual–specific: that is, those movement choices which an individual makes within a particular context. Movement Analysis as a system of observation assumes that a significant degree of individual freedom in movement quality is always present within biological, cultural, and contextually defined bodily repertoires."

(Janet Kaylo)

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attunementbodies in spacebodily engagement • bodily repertoires • body experiencechoreographycorporealdance performance • dance therapy • everyday movementexpressive repertoirefigures in spaceforensic detail • freedom of movement • intimacyintimateintimate movement • kinaesthetic sensitivity • kinesthetic • kinesthetic participation • kinetic exchange • Laban Movement Analysis • language for describing movement • LMA • movementmovement analysis • movement analysis methodology • movement and subjective experience • movement efficiency • movement experience • movement life • movement lives • movement performance • movement quality • movement vocabulary • nonverbal behaviourobservationpatterns of movement • phenomenology of mind • phenomenology of movement • physical presenceposturepuppetryreal-life • Rudolf Laban • seeing • seeing another • sensitivity to others • sensory abilitysubtlety • system of observation • theatre performance • therapeutic • understanding movementwatching

CONTRIBUTOR

Elisza Ribeiro
09 SEPTEMBER 2011

2 Dimen­sional Life of Her

"2 Dimen­sional Life of Her is a visual per­for­mance made of draw­ing, ani­ma­tion, pup­petry, pro­jec­tion and paper.

Set in an artist's stu­dio, a richly imag­ined par­al­lel world is awoken where every­thing that was thought to be still or flat becomes some­thing else. Her draw­ings repro­duce them­selves, drift between sur­faces and move in and out of three dimen­sions. She loses con­trol of her cre­ations and absolutely any­thing becomes possible..."

(Fleur Elise Noble)

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2 Dimen­sional Life of Her • 2D2D representationsartworksAustraliacollagedrawing • Fleur Elise Noble • paperpapercuttingperformance • performative possibilities of drawing • projectionpuppetryspeculative designtableau vivanttheatre • theatre experiences • theatre spaces

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 NOVEMBER 2009

Alexander Calder magically breathed life into inanimate objects

"Alexander Calder magically breathed life into inanimate objects, using wire and recycled materials to create this army of circus characters. Beginning in 1927, Calder performed the Circus in Paris, New York, and elsewhere. He would issue invitations to his guests, who would sit on makeshift bleachers munching peanuts, just like the real circus. With the crash of cymbals and music from an old gramophone, the circus would begin. Many of the individual circus animals and performers include mechanized parts – Calder was originally trained as a mechanical engineer.

It wasn't the tricks or gimmicks of the circus that appealed to Calder, but the dynamic movement of bodies in space. He first went to the Ringling Brothers, Barnum & Bailey circus in 1925. He was inspired by the mechanics of the circus and made hundreds of drawings of the equipment and the ropes and the guy wires for the tents. Later in his career, Calder turned his attention to more abstract work. ... He went on to invent the mobile and other works of moving sculpture."

(Adam Weinberg, Whitney Museum of American Art)

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19271955ad-hocAlexander Calderanimationart • Barnum & Bailey • bodies in spacecharacterchoreographycircusdrawing • dynamic movement • improvisationinanimate objects • mobile sculpture • motionmovement • moving sculpture • performancepioneerpuppetry • Ringling Brothers • theatreWhitney MuseumWhitney Museum of American Art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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