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Which clippings match 'Art History' keyword pg.1 of 5
05 NOVEMBER 2017

Dada was an effort to reinvigorate art through critical negation

"we should think of Dada in terms of the precise and deliberate negation of art. Dada sought to destroy art. Why? It is my contention that for Dada, art was itself negative: Dada conceived of art as absence, exclusion, and division. This is not in the sense that art was somehow in a state of decay or socially compromised. Rather, for Dada, art was its processes of negation, processes which were not contingent but constitutive and essential to art"

(Mark Hutchinson, 2015)

Hutchinson, M. (2015). "Dada Contra Art History." Dada/Surrealism 20(1).

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2015activist practices • against art • anti-disciplinary activities • art as activism • art historyartistic activismavant-garde art • biding legacy • call to arms • conventional cultural terms • critical negation • Dada • Dada Manifesto • destruction of art • destruction of the old • disciplinary promiscuity • discursive struggleshegemonyinstitutionalised artinterdisciplinaritylegacy • Mark Hutchinson • modernism • negation • negativity • nihilism • ossification • painting salons • political art • positive creativity • raucous skepticism • rebellious art • Salon des Refuses • skepticism • stagnation • subversion • sweep clean • University of Iowa

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 OCTOBER 2017

Artists appropriate when they adopt imagery, concepts and ways of making art other artists have used at other times

"Appropriation, first of all, is a common technique. People appropriate when they make things their own and integrate them into their way of life, by buying or stealing commodities, acquiring knowledge, claiming places as theirs and so on. Artists appropriate when they adopt imagery, concepts and ways of making art other artists have used at other times to adapt these artistic means to their own interests, or when they take objects, images or practices from popular (or foreign) cultures and restage them within the context of their work to either enrich or erode conventional definitions of what an artwork can be. As such, this technique could be described as comparatively timeless, or at least, as being practiced as long as modern society exists. For, ever since labour was divided and the abstract organization of social life alienated people from the way in which they would want to live, appropriation has been a practice of getting back from society what it takes from its members. At the same time, appropriation can be understood as one of the most basic procedures of modern art production and education. To cite, copy and modify exemplary works from art history is the model for developing art practice (neo)classicist tendencies have always championed. During the last two centuries this model was repeatedly challenged by advocates of the belief that modern individuals should produce radically new art by virture of their spontaneous creativity. The postmodern critics of this cult of individual genius in turn claimed that it is a gross ideological distortion to portray the making of art as a heroic act of original creation. Instead they advanced the paradigm of appropriation as a materialist model that describes art production as the gradual re-shuffling of a basic set of cultural terms through their strategical re-use and eventual transformation."

(Jan Verwoert, 2007)

ART&RESEARCH: A Journal of Ideas, Contexts and Methods, Volume 1. No. 2. Summer 2007, ISSN 1752-6388

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2007 • acquiring knowledge • adopting concepts • adopting imagery • adopting ways of making art • appropriation practicesArt and Research (journal)art historyart practice • artistic appropriation • artistic meansartworkauthor as geniusauthorshipcitationcite • common creative technique • copy and modify • copy-and-paste culturecopying of artistic works • Craig Owens • creative genius • creative technique • cult of individual genius • cult of the author • Douglas Crimp • exemplary works • expropriation • Frederic Jameson • genial creatorgenius myth • heroic act • ideological distortion • Jan Verwoert • making of art • materialist model • modern art • modern art education • modern art production • neoclassicist tendencies • nothing is original • original creation • pastiche • postmodern critics • radically new art • Robert Longoromantic notion of the artist • spontaneous creativity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 FEBRUARY 2015

Eye Appeal: Spectacle on Stage and in Life

"From ancient times to the present 'spectacle' (the visual aspects of human performance–architecture, scenery, costumes, makeup, lighting, special effects, and staging) has been used to expressively embody and evoke meaning in rituals, ceremonies, and artistic performances. This course [Eye Appeal: Spectacle on Stage and in Life at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro] will examine the use of spectacle as an expressive mode of communication in human performance from antiquity to the present."

(Bob Hansen, 2004)

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2004 • aesthetician • antiquityart historyartifice • artistic performances • Ben Jonson • Bryan Holmes • ceremony • Cinquecento • circus • commanding form • costume design • court spectacles • creation of spectacle • dramatic literature • entertainment spectacle • expressive mode of communication • eyecatching • George Kernodle • high renaissance • human performance • Inigo Jones • Jean-Baptiste Poquelin • John Lahr • Jonathan Price • lecture programmeLeonardo da Vincilightingmake-upMichelangelo • Moliere • parade • Phyllis Hartnoll • physiological reactions • psychological reactions • public showsRaphael • religious rites • renaissanceritualscene designsceneryscenographysetting • Shakespeare • show (spectacle)special effectsspectacle • spectacles • spetakel • stage magic • stagecraft • staging • Susanne Langer • Sybil Rosenfeld • technical theatre • theatre architecture • Thomas Heck • TitianTiziano • Tiziano Vecelli • Tiziano Vecellio • University of North Carolina • University of North Carolina at Greensboro • visual and performance elements • visual spectaclevisual spectacular • visually striking

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 OCTOBER 2014

Radical Museology / Working the Collection

"Drawing from Claire Bishop's recently published Radical Museology Or What's Contemporary in Museums of Contemporary Art? and taking place against the backdrop of our reading of the Arts Council England Collection, this roundtable focuses on the economic, historiographical, geopolitical and wider societal stakes of public acquisition and collection display. Focusing on museums that offer non–conservative and critically–reflective models.

Participants include Jesús Carrillo (Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid), Francesco Manacorda (Artistic Director, Tate Liverpool) and Marta Dziewanska (Museum of Modern Art Warsaw). Chaired by Claire Bishop."

(Chaired by Claire Bishop, 22 May 2014, Nottingham Contemporary)

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2014acquisitionsart historyart museumArts Council England • Arts Council England Collection • chronological ordering • Claire Bishop • collection display • collectionsconstellations metaphor • contemporaneity • contemporary artcontemporary art exhibitionscontemporary art museumcontemporary culture • critically-reflective models • Dan Perjovschi • dialectical contemporaneity • Francesco Manacorda • geopolitical • historiographical • Isobel Whitelegg • Jesus Carrillo • Madrid • Marta Dziewanska • Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofiamuseologymuseum • Museum of Modern Art Warsaw • museum studies • museumsNottingham Contemporaryperiodisation • permanent collection • presentism • public acquisitions • Reina Sofia • short-termism • Tate Liverpool • The Arcades Projectthematic organisation • Warsaw

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 JANUARY 2014

BEAUTY: animating Western romantic paintings

CREDITS: Director RINO STEFANO TAGLIAFIERRO Assistant Director LAILA SONSINO 2nd Assistant Director CARLOTTA BALESTRIERI Editing – Compositing – Animation RINO STEFANO TAGLIAFIERRO Sound Design ENRICO ASCOLI Art Direction RINO STEFANO TAGLIAFIERRO Historiographer GIULIANO CORTI.

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2D space • Adrien Henri Tanoux • Albert Bierstadt • Andrea Vaccaro • animated painting • Arnold Bocklin • art history • Asher Brown Durand • Augustin Theodule Ribot • beauty • Carlotta Balestrieri • Caspar David Friedrich • classical subjects • Claude Lorrain • Correggio • Elizabeth Jane Gardner Bouguereau • enliven • Enrico Ascoli • Enrique Simonet • Felice Boselli • figuration • figure painting • Franz von Stuck • Fritz Zuber-Buhle • Gabriel Cornelius von Max • Gabriel von Max • Gioacchino Pagliei • Giuliano Corti • Guido Reni • Guillaume Seignac • Gustave Dore • Herbert Draper • homage • Hugues Merle • Ilya Repin • interpretation • Ivan Shishkin • Jacques-Luois David • Jakub Schikaneder • James Sant • Jan Lievens • Jan van Huysum • Johannes VermeerJohn Everett Millais • John William Godward • Joseph Rebell • Jules Joseph Lefebvre • Laila Sonsino • living paintingliving pictures • Louis Jean Francois Lagrenee • Luca Giordano • Luis Ricardo Falero • Marcus Stone • Martin Johnson Heade • Martinus Rorbye • Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio • motion painting • movementmoving paintingpainting • Paul Delaroche • Paul Hippolyte Delaroche • Paul Peel • Peter Paul Rubens • Pierre Auguste Cot • Pieter ClaeszreenactmentRembrandt van Rijnremediation • Rino Stefano Tagliafierro • Roberto Ferri • salon painter • Sophie Gengembre Anderson • tableau vivanttableaux changeanttableaux mouvantsTheodore Gericault • Thomas Cole • Thomas Eakins • Thomas Hill • Tiziano • Victor Karlovich Shtemberg • William-Adolphe Bouguereau

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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