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Which clippings match 'Still Life' keyword pg.1 of 1
14 MARCH 2013

Lou Loeber: childrens picture book illustrations

"Prentenboek met 18 platen met geometrische gevormde figuren van een van de 'constructivistisch gerichte experimentele schilders' met plaatjes die gemaakt lijken 'met behulp van de tangramdoos' (S. de Bodt. Prentenboeken). Bevat onder andere gedichten en prenten over een vlinder, kippen, spreeuwen, een geitenbok, speelgoed, een varken, de sproeiwagen, een watermannetje, de vuilnisman, lammetjes, spelen met een tol, een interieur met zonnestraal, een kwikstaart, koe en schaap in de wei, een lezend meisje, regen, sneeuwpret en Sinterklaas."

(The Memory of the Netherlands)

Simon Franke (1927). "Gouden Vlinders" picture book illustrated Lou Loeber.

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TAGS

1927abstract artbook illustrationbutterfly • Charles-Edouard Jeanneret • chickenchildrens bookchildrens book illustrationcityscapeConstructivist-inspiredcowDe Stijldesign formalismdrawingetchingeveryday life • experimental painter • farm • farmyard • gedichtenbundels • geometric figures • glass painting • goat • Gouden Vlinders • human figure • illustration • kunstenaarsboeken • lamb • landscapeLe Corbusierlinocut • Lou Loeber • meadow • modernist aestheticspicture bookPiet Mondrianpigplants • prentenboeken • rain • rubbish collector • Santa Claus • Saskia de Bodt • sheep • Simon Franke • simplified forms • simplified representations • snow • spinning top • starlingsstill life • storybook • tangram box • The Memory of the Netherlands • tightened forms • visual abstractionvisual artwomen in art and design

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 APRIL 2011

Far better than 3-D: animated GIFs that savour a passing moment

"You know how people sometimes say that jazz is the only truly American art form? Animated GIFs are like the jazz of the internet: they could only exist, and be created and appreciated, online. That said, PopTart Cat is not exactly on par with Thelonious Monk. But photographer Jamie Beck and motion graphics artist Kevin Burg may have finally found a way to elevate the animated GIF to a level approaching fine art, with their 'cinemagraphs' –– elegant, subtly animated creations that are 'something more than a photo but less than a video.' ...

The pair was inspired to create these cinemagraphs while preparing to cover Fashion Week this past February: 'We wanted to tell more of a story than a single still frame photograph but didn't want the high maintenance aspect of a video,' they told Co.Design via email."

(John Pavlus, Co.Design)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 NOVEMBER 2008

New Still Life Interactive - National Gallery of Art

"Create interactive compositions that mirror the paintings of the old masters. This Art Zone activity is suitable for all ages. Young children can explore spatial arrangement, perspective, proportion, and balance while creating engaging, interactive still life compositions that mix everyday objects with elements borrowed from famous works of art. More advanced artists will enjoy creating complex arrangements, and then switching to the painting mode to add and manipulate textured 'brush strokes" that give their art a more abstract, painterly quality.

A slide show (requires Flash) features photographs of real still life paintings and related art objects in the Gallery's collection that inspired this interactive program.

Use the COMPOSER to arrange your still life, then switch to PAINTER to add interesting textures."

(Judy Decker)

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TAGS

2D drawingart • ArtConversation • exhibitionfine artgalleryinteractivekidsmuseum • National Gallery of Art • NGAKids • objectstill lifetoyUSAvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 JANUARY 2004

Paris streets as crime-scene evidence

"Eugene Atget, who, around 1900, took photographs of deserted Paris streets. It has quite justly been said of him that he photographed them like scenes of crime. The scene of a crime, too, is deserted; it is photographed for the purpose of establishing evidence. With Atget, photographs become standard evidence for historical occurrences, and acquire a hidden political significance. They demand a specific kind of approach; free–floating contemplation is not appropriate to them. They stir the viewer; he feels challenged by them in a new way. At the same time picture magazines begin to put up signposts for him, right ones or wrong ones, no matter. For the first time, captions have become obligatory. And it is clear that they have an altogether different character than the title of a painting. The directives which the captions give to those looking at pictures in illustrated magazines soon become even more explicit and more imperative in the film where the meaning of each single picture appears to be prescribed by the sequence of all preceding ones."
(Walter Benjamin)

Benjamin, Walter (1988). 'Illuminations', New York, US: Random House.

Fig.1 Eugène Atget (French, 1857–1927), 'Boulevard de Strasbourg 1912', Albumen silver print from glass negative 22.4 x 17.5 cm (8 13/16 x 6 7/8 in.). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gilman Collection, Purchase, Ann Tenenbaum and Thomas H. Lee Gift, 2005.

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TAGS

1900 • abandoned streetscaptioncity • crime scene • deserted streets • empty streets • Eugene Atget • forensic evidence • forensics • free-floating • free-floating contemplationimplied movementliving picturesParis • Paris streets • photographphotography • signpost • silenceslice of frozen timestill lifestill life photographystillnessstreetsWalter Benjamin
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