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Which clippings match 'Thematic Organisation' keyword pg.1 of 1
27 FEBRUARY 2017

Writing a Literature Review Using Thematic Groupings

"In a [literature] review organized thematically, you group and discuss your sources in terms of the themes, theoretical concepts, and topics that either you decide are important to understanding your topic or that you have identified from reviewing the key studies on your topic. This structure is considered stronger than the chronological organization because you define the theories, constructs, categories, or themes that are important to your research. ... In these types of reviews, you explain why certain information is treated together, and your headings define your unique organization of the topic. The sequence of the concepts or themes should be from broad to specific."

(Sally Jensen, 09 September 2013)

TAGS

academic writing • categorisain according to theme • chronological organisation • discussion of the literature • dissertation topic • dissertation writing • essay topic • essay writinggrouped categoricallygrouped related worksliterature revieworganisation of knowledgeorganisation through groupingprevious researchresearch paperresearch topicthematic organisationthematically • thematically organised • theoretical concepts • theoretical topics • undergraduate research • writing a literature review

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 OCTOBER 2014

Radical Museology / Working the Collection

"Drawing from Claire Bishop's recently published Radical Museology Or What's Contemporary in Museums of Contemporary Art? and taking place against the backdrop of our reading of the Arts Council England Collection, this roundtable focuses on the economic, historiographical, geopolitical and wider societal stakes of public acquisition and collection display. Focusing on museums that offer non–conservative and critically–reflective models.

Participants include Jesús Carrillo (Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid), Francesco Manacorda (Artistic Director, Tate Liverpool) and Marta Dziewanska (Museum of Modern Art Warsaw). Chaired by Claire Bishop."

(Chaired by Claire Bishop, 22 May 2014, Nottingham Contemporary)

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TAGS

2014acquisitionsart historyart museumArts Council England • Arts Council England Collection • chronological ordering • Claire Bishop • collection display • collectionsconstellations metaphor • contemporaneity • contemporary artcontemporary art exhibitionscontemporary art museumcontemporary culture • critically-reflective models • Dan Perjovschi • dialectical contemporaneity • Francesco Manacorda • geopolitical • historiographical • Isobel Whitelegg • Jesus Carrillo • Madrid • Marta Dziewanska • Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofiamuseologymuseum • Museum of Modern Art Warsaw • museum studies • museumsNottingham Contemporaryperiodisation • permanent collection • presentism • public acquisitions • Reina Sofia • short-termism • Tate Liverpool • The Arcades Projectthematic organisation • Warsaw

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JANUARY 2010

Organising via: Location, Alphabet, Time, Category, Continuum

"The first step in transforming data into information is to explore its organization. This simple yet crucial process can appear futile, but often you can discover something through it that you had never seen before. It is important to realize that the very organization of things affects the way we interpret and understand their separate pieces. Take any set of things: students in a classroom, financials for a company, information about a city, or animals in a zoo. How would you organize these? Which is best? Richard Saul Wurman suggests five ways to organize everything... Literally everything can be organized by alphabet, location, time, continuum, number, or category...

Often, there are often better ways to organize data than the traditional ones that first occur to us. Each organization of the same set of data expresses different attributes and messages."

(Nathan Shedroff)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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