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19 JULY 2013

Art Review: international contemporary art magazine

"ArtReview is one of the world's leading international contemporary art magazines. Founded in 1949, it is dedicated to expanding contemporary art's audience and reach. We believe that art plays a vital role in inspiring a richer, more profound understanding of human experience, culture and society today. Aimed at both a specialist and a general audience, the magazine features a mixture of criticism, reviews, reportage and specially commissioned artworks, and offers the most established, in–depth and intimate portrait of international contemporary art in all its shapes and forms."

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TAGS

1949 • art reviews • ArtReview • audience and reach • commissioned artworks • contemporary art • contemporary art magazines • culture and societyfine art • fine art publications • fine artist • fine artshuman experienceinternational • international contemporary art • magazineart criticism • publicationreportagereviewsshapes and formsvisual art • visual art publications • visual arts exhibitions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 MAY 2012

Knowledge Unlatched: a new academic publishing business model

"The Problem: specialist books in the Humanities and Social Sciences (including but not exclusively monographs) are under threat due to spiralling prices and reduced library funds.

Access is restricted: while academics could choose to bypass existing publishers and just post content on the Web, the general consensus within academia is that they would prefer to have their books professionally published.

Only a few hundred copies make it into the eight to twelve thousand research universities, and very few teaching universities have access to these materials. For many individuals private purchase is beyond their reach.

A Possible Solution: cover the costs of creating the first digital copy through a library consortium and make the titles open access. Publishers would continue to generate additional revenues from the sale of print, ePub and PDFs in bespoke formats."

(Frances Pinter, 2011)

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TAGS

2011academiaacademic journals • academic publishing • academics • bespoke format • Bloomsbury Academicbookcontent on the webdigital convergencedigital copyeconomic changeepub • Frances Pinter • groupon • humanities and social sciences • journal subscription • knowledge access • knowledge economy • Knowledge Unlatched • library consortium • long form • long form publication • longform • longform publication • media landscape • monograph • new business modelsnew digital distribution networksold mediaopen accessPDFpeer review • professionally published • publicationpublisherpublishingpublishing model • reduced library funds • research universities • sale of printscholarly journals • specialist books • spiralling prices • teaching universities

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 FEBRUARY 2012

Zelda Zine 1: a new digital age printed video game fanzine

"Printed video game magazines might be an endangered species these days, but it's not such a bad time for fan–made zines. While every other month we hear news of a different publication we grew up with limiting or eliminating its monthly issues, not all is bleak for people who like tangible content. ...

A printed zine like this remains relevant in today's digital age by featuring content that deals with nostalgia and connections to past games. In fact, art and stories that capture players' unique histories and experiences with video games age gracefully over time.

Zelda Zine 1 has a certain timelessness that allows you to pick it up and experience it fresh, years after it was printed. It doesn't feel dated with tidbits of information about new modes or weapons or when the launch date will be when the game already came out months ago. It feels more like Link in Ocarina of Time, reverting to his younger self to discover that Kakariko Village is just as he left it. That is, the contributors' accounts and interpretations of the legend (both written and visual) will always remain in their minds as they now share them with the world on paper."

(Alejandro Quan–Madrid, 22 February 22 2012, Bitmob.com)

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TAGS

Bitmobblack and white • decline of magazines • digital agedigital culture • fan-made zines • fandomfanzinegamesgaminggaming culture • Kakariko Village • launch date • Legend of Zelda • Link in Ocarina of Time • magazinemagazine publishingNintendonostalgiaprint publication • printed media • printed video game magazine • printed zine • publication • Skyward Sword • Space Invaderssubculture • tangible content • tidbitsUK • unique histories • video game magazine • video game zine fanzine • video games age • Zelda Zine 1 • zine

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 FEBRUARY 2012

Scientific publishing: the price of information

"On January 21st Timothy Gowers, a mathematician at Cambridge University, wrote a blog post outlining the reasons for his longstanding boycott of research journals published by Elsevier. This firm, which is based in the Netherlands, owns more than 2,000 journals, including such top–ranking titles as Cell and the Lancet. However Dr Gowers, who won the Fields medal, mathematics's equivalent of a Nobel prize, in 1998, is not happy with it, and he hoped his post might embolden others to do something similar.

It did. More than 2,700 researchers from around the world have so far signed an online pledge set up by Tyler Neylon, a fellow–mathematician who was inspired by Dr Gowers's post, promising not to submit their work to Elsevier's journals, or to referee or edit papers appearing in them. That number seems, to borrow a mathematical term, to be growing exponentially. If it really takes off, established academic publishers might find they have a revolution on their hands. ...

Dr Neylon's petition, though, is symptomatic of a wider conflict between academics and their publishers–a conflict that is being thrown into sharp relief by the rise of online publishing. Academics, who live in a culture which values the free and easy movement of information (and who edit and referee papers for nothing) have long been uncomfortable bedfellows with commercial publishing companies, which want to maximise profits by charging for access to that information, and who control many (although not all) of the most prestigious scientific journals."

(Feb 4th 2012, The Economist)

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academicacademic journalacademicsboycott • bundling • Cambridge University • Cell (journal) • Elsevier (publisher) • free access • free and easy movement of information • funded researchgift culture • Lancet (journal) • libraries • Nick Fowler • online publishing • petition • prestigious • publicationpublisherpublishers • publishing companies • referee papers • Research Works Act • scientific journals • subscribe • taxpayer-funded research • The EconomistTimothy Gowers • Tyler Neylon

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 MAY 2011

Ensemble Logic: early experiments writing for hypertext

"Essays, email, poetics, directions, maps, images. ensemble logic is a seriously beautiful series of fragments that together make an 'ensemble' arrangement that revels in the pleasure of reading and writing. The publication is a chance to consider how writing for an electronic environment translates into (back–to) the book. Each fragment is marked with a location guide that allows the reader to easily find the complete work on the CDROM included with the book and on the web. The CDROM archives the complete eWRe site up to July 2000."

Electronic Writing Research Ensemble (2000). Ensemble Logic. T. Hoskin and S. Rob. Adelaide, South Australia.

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TAGS

2000 • Anne Robertson • Anne Walton • Australia • Bill Seaman • CDROMdigital multimedia • Dylan Everett • electronic media • electronic Writing Research ensemble • ensemble arrangement • ensemble logic • eWRe • fragments • Gregory L. Ulmer • Heather Kerr • hyperfiction • hypernarrativehypertextinteractive narrative • Jessica Wallace • Joanne Harris • Josephine Wilson • Katie Moore • Linda Carroli • Linda Marie Walker • link • Mark Amerika • Mark Stephens • Michael Grimm • net.artnonlinearon the web • pleasure of reading and writing • publication • Simon Rob • Sonja Porcaro • Sue Thomas • Suzanne Treister • Teri Hoskin • translation • writing for an electronic environment • writing for hypertext

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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