Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'DRM' keyword pg.1 of 1
24 OCTOBER 2013

Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement

"The Trans–Pacific Partnership (TPP) is a secretive, multi–national trade agreement that threatens to extend restrictive intellectual property (IP) laws across the globe and rewrite international rules on its enforcement."

(Electronic Frontier Foundation)

1

TAGS

2011Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA)Aotearoa New ZealandAustralia • Brunei Darussalam • CanadaChilecontroversial policycopyright • copyright measures • Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) • draft document • DRM • due process • Electronic Frontier Foundationevolving needsfreedom of speechgeographical location • innovative technology sector • intellectual property • intellectual property enforcement • international rules • international treatiesJapanlaw enforcement • leaked documents • MalaysiaMexicoonline privacyopen webpatentsPeruprivacy policyprivacy rights • secretive • signatory countries • SingaporeTPPtrade agreementtrademarksTrans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) • US law • USAVietnam

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 NOVEMBER 2012

Sita Sings the Blues: audience-distributed animated feature film

"I hereby give Sita Sings the Blues to you. Like all culture, it belongs to you already, but I am making it explicit with a Creative Commons Attribution–Share Alike License. Please distribute, copy, share, archive, and show Sita Sings the Blues. From the shared culture it came, and back into the shared culture it goes.

You don't need my permission to copy, share, publish, archive, show, sell, broadcast, or remix Sita Sings the Blues. Conventional wisdom urges me to demand payment for every use of the film, but then how would people without money get to see it? How widely would the film be disseminated if it were limited by permission and fees? Control offers a false sense of security. The only real security I have is trusting you, trusting culture, and trusting freedom.

That said, my colleagues and I will enforce the Share Alike License. You are not free to copy–restrict ('copyright') or attach Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) to Sita Sings the Blues or its derivative works.

Some of the songs in Sita Sings the Blues are not free, and may never be; copyright law requires you to obey their respective licenses. This is not by my choice; please see our restrictions page for more.

There is the question of how I'll get money from all this. My personal experience confirms audiences are generous and want to support artists. Surely there's a way for this to happen without centrally controlling every transaction. The old business model of coercion and extortion is failing. New models are emerging, and I'm happy to be part of that. But we're still making this up as we go along. You are free to make money with the free content of Sita Sings the Blues, and you are free to share money with me. People have been making money in Free Software for years; it's time for Free Culture to follow. I look forward to your innovations."

(Nina Paley)

1

TAGS

attribution-share alike • audience-distributioncoercioncontrol • copy-restrict • copyrightcopyright lawCreative Commonsderivative works • Digital Restrictions Management • disseminationDRMeconomic model • emerging economic models • film fundingfree contentfree culture • free culture movement • free softwarefreedom • making money • Nina Paley • old business model • open distribution • payment • permission • Ramayana • Share Alike License • shared culture • Sita Sings the Blues • support artists

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
16 JULY 2009

Electronic Frontier Foundation: defending free speech, privacy, innovation, and consumer rights

"From the Internet to the iPod, technologies are transforming our society and empowering us as speakers, citizens, creators, and consumers. When our freedoms in the networked world come under attack, the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) is the first line of defense. EFF broke new ground when it was founded in 1990 – well before the Internet was on most people's radar – and continues to confront cutting–edge issues defending free speech, privacy, innovation, and consumer rights today. From the beginning, EFF has championed the public interest in every critical battle affecting digital rights.

Blending the expertise of lawyers, policy analysts, activists, and technologists, EFF achieves significant victories on behalf of consumers and the general public. EFF fights for freedom primarily in the courts, bringing and defending lawsuits even when that means taking on the US government or large corporations. By mobilizing more than 50,000 concerned citizens through our Action Center, EFF beats back bad legislation. In addition to advising policymakers, EFF educates the press and public. Sometimes just defending technologies isn't enough, so EFF also supports the development of freedom–enhancing inventions."
(Electronic Frontier Foundation)

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 NOVEMBER 2008

ACAP: Automated Content Access Protocol

"ACAP (Automated Content Access Protocol) is a non–proprietary, global permissions tool that puts content owners in control of their online content in a way that is conducive to developing new online business models, putting new, high–quality content on the net and to maximizing the benefits of the relationship with search engines.
Devised by publishers in collaboration with search engines after an intensive year–long pilot in 2006–2007, ACAP is set to revolutionise the creation, dissemination, use, and protection of copyright–protected content on the worldwide web.

ACAP is destined to become the universal permissions protocol on the Internet, an open, non–proprietary standard through which content owners can communicate permissions for access and use to online intermediaries.

In the first instance, ACAP provides a framework that will allow any publisher, large or small, to express access and use policies in a language that search engines' robot "spiders" can be taught to understand. ACAP's scope is now being extended to other business relationships and other media types including music and the audiovisual sectors. Technical work is ongoing to improve and finesse ACAP V.1.

Thanks to the enabling, open nature of ACAP, content providers will now be able to make more content available to users through the search engines, and to continue to innovate and invest in the development of business models for network publishing. With ACAP, the online publishing environment will become as rich and diverse as the offline one."
(ACAP)

TAGS

ACAP • accessauthorship • Automated Content Access Protocol • business modelcontentcopyright • digital rights management • DRMinformationintellectual property rightsInternetmanagement • non-proprietary • onlineownershippublishers • robots • search • spiders • web

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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