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15 JULY 2012

The New Zealand Film Archive

"Established in 1981, the Film Archive is an independent charitable trust overseen by a Board of Trustees representing film, archival, Maori and community interests. The Film Archive's constitution and kaupapa express a commitment to collect, protect and connect New Zealand's film and television history.

When an item is in the care of the Archive, it is considered the property of the depositor. Subsequently the copyright for the material remains with the legal rights holders.

The collections of predominantly New Zealand film, video and television date from 1895 to the present day. Every genre of filmmaking - feature films, documentaries, short films, home movies, newsreels, television programmes and film and television advertisements - is represented. There is also a significant documentation collection which includes publicity materials, stills, posters, production records, props, costumes and equipment housed in Wellington.

As there is no statutory deposit legislation for film in New Zealand, material is deposited voluntarily - and without cost to the depositor. Maintaining a kaitiaki role over the collections the Film Archive's guardianship ensures ownership of the original item remains with the depositor and copyright is maintained by the appropriate parties. In the case of material with Maori content, the Film Archive actively maintains relationships with whanau/hapu/iwi to ensure appropriate long term care and access."

(New Zealand Film Archive)

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TAGS

18951981advertisementAotearoa New ZealandarchivalarchiveAustralasia • care and access • collectioncostumecultural heritagedocumentarydocumentationfeature film • film advertisement • film and television history • film archivefilm historyfilmmaking • guardianship • hapu • home movie • independent charitable trust • iwilegal rights holders • long term access • long term care • long term care and access • moving imageNew Zealand cinemaNew Zealand cultureNew Zealand Film ArchivenewsreelNZ Film Archive • production records • publicity materials • publicity posters • publicity stills • short film • television advertisement • television history • television programmeWellington • whana

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 JULY 2012

Maurizio Anzeri: embroidered patterns on found vintage photographs

"Maurizio Anzeri makes his portraits by sewing directly into found vintage photographs. His embroidered patterns garnish the figures like elaborate costumes, but also suggest a psychological aura, as if revealing the person's thoughts or feelings. The antique appearance of the photographs is often at odds with the sharp lines and silky shimmer of the threads. The combined media gives the effect of a dimension where history and future converge. The image used in Round Midnight is an early 20th century ‘glamour shot' that at the time would have been considered titillating for both the girl's nudity and ethnicity. Anzeri's delicately stitched veil recasts the figure with an uncomfortable modesty, overlaying a past generation's cross-cultural anxieties with an allusion to our own.

'I've been collecting old photographs for a long time. A few years ago I was doing ink drawings with them and out of curiosity I stitched into one. I work a lot with threads and hand stitching, and the link to photography was a natural progression. I put tracing paper over the photo and draw on the face until it develops. Sometimes the image comes straight away, suggested by a detail on a dress or in the background, but with the majority of them I spend a lot of time drawing. Once the drawing is done, I pierce the photo with a set of needle-like tools I invented and take the paper away; the holes are obsessively paced at the same distance to convey an idea of geometry. When I begin the stitching something else happens, drawing will never do what thread will – the light changes, and at some points you can lose the face, and at others you can still see under it.'

'There's a dynamic in what happens between the photograph, the embroidery on top, and you standing in front looking at it. I try never to completely cover a face, you can always still see the face underneath. There are no rules other than I always leave one or both eyes open. Nothing is bigger in my head than a face, it's the best landscape we can look at. It's all to do with the centre, the body. Like a costume or other identity, my work reveals something that is behind the face that suddenly becomes in front. It's like a mask – not a mask you put on, but something that grows out of you. It's what the photo is telling you and what you want to read in the photos. I get my ideas from many different sources: it could be theatre, or someone dressed up on the tube, a tribe in Papua New Guinea, or Versace. It's never one specific thing.'

'Photographs from the 40s and 50s have a totally different quality from photos we're used to today. We don't recognise them as photographs now, they really look like watercolours or drawings. The images I use are anonymous, I find them everywhere; I'm really into flea markets and car boot sales, when you enter you have no idea what you're going to encounter. In everything I see there is something I am interested in, but I try to look at them as plain canvas. Art history is very important to me, it's all been done before but it's never been done by you: if you don't look into the past there is no chance to go into the future. The surrealist movement is important to my work, but I don't become obsessed by it, it's not dictating rules. I understand history in a formal respect, and think of past artists like travelling companions – making work is like going for a walk with them. At the end of the day it's about humanity.'"

(Saatchi Gallery)

Fig.1 Maurizio Anzeri, "Rita", 2011, Embroidery on photograph, 23.5 x 17.5 cm.

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TAGS

antique • antique appearance • art history • car boot sales • costumecraft nostalgia • cross-cultural anxieties • design craftdesign revisionism • elaborate costumes • embroidered patterns • embroidery • embroidery on photograph • facefigures • flea markets • foundfound imagesgeometryglamour shot • hand stitching • inner thoughts • making art with recycled materialsmask • Maurizio Anzeri • modesty • needle • nostalgia • old photographs • overlaying • photographpictorial languageportrait • psychological aura • Saatchi Gallerysewing • sharp lines • silky shimmer • stitched • stitching • surrealist movement • textile arts • threads • travelling companions • veilvintage

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 FEBRUARY 2012

Jacob Sutton's L.E.D. Surfer: a night-time snowboarding short lights up the last of the winter snow

"Fashion photographer and filmmaker Jacob Sutton swaps the studio for the slopes of Tignes in the Rhône-Alpes region of south-eastern France, with a luminous after hours short starring Artec pro snowboarder William Hughes. The electrifying film sees Hughes light up the snow-covered French hills in a bespoke L.E.D.-enveloped suit courtesy of designer and electronics whizz John Spatcher. 'I was really drawn to the idea of a lone character made of light surfing through darkness,' says Sutton of his costume choice. 'I've always been excited by unusual ways of lighting things, so it seemed like an exciting idea to make the subject of the film the only light source.' Sutton, who has created work for the likes of Hermès, Burberry and The New York Times, spent three nights on a skidoo with his trusty Red Epic camera at temperatures of -25C to snap Hughes carving effortlessly through the deep snow, even enlisting his own father to help maintain the temperamental suit throughout the demanding shoot. 'Filming in the suit was the most surreal thing I've done in 20 years of snowboarding,' says Hughes of the charged salopettes. 'Luckily there was plenty of vin rouge to keep me warm, and Jacob's enthusiasm kept everyone going through the cold nights.'"

(Nowness, 16 February 2012)

[This dramatic clip appears to have been designed to target the audience of the new lifestyle magazine called "Nowness". The wish is presumably that the clip becomes a carrier for promoting the magazine's brand.]

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TAGS

2012alone in the wilderness • Burberry • cameracarvingcoldcostumedarknessfashion photographerfilmfilmmakerFranceglowing • glowing man • Hermes • Jacob Sutton • John Spatcher • LEDlightlightingliminal spaceluminousluminous costumeNew York Times • Nowness (magazine) • RED Epic • skidoo • snow • snowboarder • snowboardingsports documentarysuitsurfersurfing • Tignes • viral marketingvisual spectacle • William Hughes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 SEPTEMBER 2011

Digital History: Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

"Lisa Fischer is Director of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation's Digital History Center (DHC). Located in the John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, the DHC was created to harness new technologies to help in engaging the public in the continuing conversation about the American Revolution, citizenship, and democracy. The DHC is currently working on a several complementary projects ranging from the creation of a new comprehensive website on the on the American Revolution to 'Virtual Williamsburg,' an initiative to create an interactive 3D model of the town as it looked in 1776 in collaboration with the University of Virginia's Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities (IATH)."

(16 February 2010)

Fig.1 Tom Ellis (2010 ). presentation by Lisa Fischer, Director of the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation’s Digital History Center.

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TAGS

1700s • 177618th century3D model3D visualisationarchaeologycolonial • Colonial Williamsburg Foundation • costumecultural heritagecultural history • DHC • digital historydigital toolshistorical interpretationhistorical maphistorical reenactmenthistorical research • IATH • interactive 3D • interactive environmentsinteractive map • Lisa Fischer • living history museummuseummuseum of cultural historyNorth America • North American Revolution • open-air museumperiod lifereconstructed buildingsreconstructionreenactmentrestorationtheme park • town • University of Virginia • Virginia • virtual heritage • virtual models • Virtual Williamsburg • visualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 SEPTEMBER 2011

The Norsk Folkemuseum living history museum in Norway

"The Norsk Folkemuseum is Norway's largest museum of cultural history. With collections from around the country, the museum shows how people lived in Norway from 1500 to the present.

The more than 150 buildings in the Open-Air Museum represent different regions in Norway, different time periods, as well as differences between town and country, and social classes. The Gol Stave Church dating from 1200 is one of five medieval buildings at the museum. The contemporary history is presented through exhibitions and documentation projects focusing especially on children, youth and the multicultural population. Permanent indoor exhibitions include folk art, folk costumes, toys and Sami culture."

(Astrid Santa, Norsk Folkemuseum)

[Actors are located in some of the buildings to provide visitors with a sense of the life of the original inhabitants.]

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TAGS

1200 • 1500 • anthropologybuilding • contemporary history • costumecultural heritagecultural historyeverydayfolkfolk art • folk costumes • folk museum • Gol Stave Church • heritagehistorical reenactment • household • indoor exhibitions • living farm museum • living history museumliving museummedieval • medieval buildings • middle ages • multicultural population • museummuseum of cultural historyNordic • Norsk Folkemuseum • Norway • Norwegian Museum of Cultural History • open-air • open-air museumOslooutdoorperiod costumeperiod lifereenactment • Sami culture • ScandinaviasettlementSimon Perkins

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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