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16 MARCH 2014

Deleuze Guattari: Societies of Control and Antipsychiatry

"if the energetic machine expressed the disciplinary bourgeoise society of the 18th and 19th centuries, computers, electronic and cybernetic machines express what Deleuze calls the 'society of control.'"

(Jeremy Jae, 2012)

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TAGS

2012anti-capitalismbourgeoise societycapital accumulationcapital flowscapitalismcontrolcultural relativismculture industry • cybernetic feedback • cybernetic machines • digital technologiesexclusionFelix Guattari • fraying • Gilles Deleuzeglobal communities • global networked society • globalisation • human social relations • inclusionJacques Derrida • Jeremy Jae • mass culture • narcissistic necrosis • networked societynew mediaNorbert Wienerrhizome • sameness • smooth spacesocial space • societies of control • society of control • subjectification • technocratic neo-capitalism • technologically manufactured culture • Theodor Adorno • worldwide circulation of electronic information

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JULY 2012

Neoliberal whizz-kid: Aotearoa New Zealand PM John Key in 1987

"A 1987 video has been unearthed featuring a 25–year–old squash–playing, accountancy graduate John Key. The bright–eyed Mr Key features in an early Close–Up story called Big Dealers. The 'portrait of 80s job du jour: foreign exchange dealer', shows the now Prime Minister in 'the pit' (trading room) as a senior forex dealer. 'Forex dealing is a work hard, play hard world with an image of rich brats who wreck restaurants but always somewhere else,' says the reporter. 'I am not denying that, that has happened and I guess that will happen again in the future but I personally perform in that way,' Mr Key responded."

(Deanna Harris, 02 Sep 2010, MediaWorks TV)

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TAGS

1980s1987 • 3 News • accountancy graduate • Aotearoa New Zealand • Big Dealers (television) • bright-eyed • businesscapital accumulationcapitalismChristchurch • Close-Up (television) • economyfinance • finance industry • financial dealingfinancial flowsfinancial gainfinancial innovationfinancial markets • financial risk • financial transactionsfinancing • foreign exchange • foreign exchange dealer • foreign exchange dealers • forex dealer • forex dealing • free market economyglobal capital flowsglobal financial marketJohn Keylifestyle • MediaWorks TV • money making • neoliberalismNew Zealand on Screen • NZ News • personal financial gain • Prime Ministerprofitrich bratriskrisk-takingsocial conservatism • squash-playing • stock marketstocks • trading room • TV3unit of capital accumulation • whizz-kid • winning • young upwardly-mobile professional • young urban professional • yuppie

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 SEPTEMBER 2005

Historical Materialism: a critical resources for the de-reification of capitalism

The materialist conception of history "retains its relevance to contemporary social life insofar as it offers critical resources for the de–reification of capitalism and its various forms of appearance. It reminds us that commodification of social life, and especially commodification of labour, are not natural, necessary, universal or absolute; nor, therefore, is the separation of the political from the economic which is entailed in the capitalist wage relation. Historical materialist critiques imply that capitalism's abstraction of politics from the economy and the naturalisation of a civil society of abstract individuals are historical conditions which are open to question and hence potentially to transformation. This transformation would necessarily entail (but not necessarily be limited to) the re–politicisation and democratisation of the economy and of civil society, such that they cease to be pseudo–objective and apparently natural conditions which confront isolated individuals as an ineluctable external "reality". Rather, they would become sites for – and objects of – reflective dialogue and contestation, mutable aspects of a broad process of social self–determination, explicitly political."

(M. Scott Solomon and Mark Rupert, Syracuse University)

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TAGS

abstractionsbusinesscapital accumulationcapitalismcommodificationcontestationdialogueeconomyfirm • historical materialism • Mark Rupert • Michael Scott Solomon • mutableproductionreflective process
25 FEBRUARY 2005

Castells: The Network Society And The Business Project

"The unit of this production process is not the firm, but the business project. The firm continues to be the legal unit of capital accumulation. But since the value of the firm ultimately depends on its valuation in the stock market, the unit of capital accumulation (the firm) itself becomes a node in a global network of financial flows. In this economy, the dominant layer is the global financial market, where all earnings from all activities and countries end up being traded. This global financial market works only partly according to market rules. It is shaped and moved by information turbulences of various origins, processed and transmitted almost instantly by telecommunicated, information systems, in the absence of the institutional regulation of global capital flows."

(Manuel Castells, p.9)

[2]. Castells, M. (2000). Materials For An Exploratory Theory Of The Network Society. London, British Journal of Sociology www.tandf.co.uk/journals.

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