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Which clippings match 'Visual Identity' keyword pg.1 of 4
12 JANUARY 2013

10 ways to communicate a brand effectively

"Delight your clients with engaging brands that hit all the sweet spots, with our ten pro tips" (Computer Arts, 11 January 2013)

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TAGS

2013 • aesthetic niche • bad ideas can lead to good ones • brand buildingbranding designbrandsclients • communicate a story • Computer Arts • create an aesthetic niche • creative identity • engaging brands • flexible designs • keep it simple • research rivals • tipsvisual communicationvisual identity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 DECEMBER 2011

Blue is still the most predictable colour on the web

"When we released our report on the colors of the social web, based on data analyzed by our Twitter theme tool, we were surprised that blue was such a dominant color in people's profile designs. Was Twitter's default color influencing their design decisions? Or is blue really THE most popular and dominant color online? ...We decided to look at the colors in the brands from the top 100 sites in the world to see if we could paint a more colorful picture.

Turns out the blue–berry doesn't fall far from the bush. The web landscape is dominated by a large number of blue brands... but Red occupies a large amount of space as well. What's driving this? You might want to say that carefully organized branding research and market tests were done to choose the perfect colors to make you spend your money, but a lot of the brands that have grown to be global web powerhouses, started as small web startups... and while large corporate giants with branding departments spend quite a lot on market research, user testing, branding, etc. Lots of the sites listed above got started with brands created by the founders themselves with little to no research into the impact their color choice would have. I once asked Mark Zuckerberg, the founder of Facebook why he chose blue for his site design... "I'm color blind, it's the only color I can see." ...and now 500 Million people around the world stare at a mostly blue website for hours each week.

While the initial reasoning for the colors chosen may be trivial, the impact that these dominant players now have in the web world will surely influence the smaller startups that want to share in the positive color associations created by their bigger siblings... Once a rocketship of a web startup takes flight, there are a number of Jr. internet astronauts hoping to emulate their success... and are inspired by their brands. And so Blue and Red will probably continue to dominate, but we can have hope for the GoWalla's, DailyBooth's and other more adventurous brands out there."

(COLOURlovers, 15 September 2010)

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TAGS

battle for bluebluebrand awarenessbrand colourbrand identitybrand recognitionbranding • branding research • colour • colour associations • colour choice • colours of the social web • colours that make you spend money • corporate colours • corporate identity • default colour • design decisions • dominant colour • market research • market tests • popular colour • profile design • Twitter • Twitter theme tool • visual identity • web landscape

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 NOVEMBER 2011

Cloud-based facial recognition services rely on finding publicly available pictures of you online

"With Carnegie Mellon's cloud–centric new mobile app, the process of matching a casual snapshot with a person's online identity takes less than a minute. Tools like PittPatt and other cloud–based facial recognition services rely on finding publicly available pictures of you online, whether it's a profile image for social networks like Facebook and Google Plus or from something more official from a company website or a college athletic portrait. In their most recent round of facial recognition studies, researchers at Carnegie Mellon were able to not only match unidentified profile photos from a dating website (where the vast majority of users operate pseudonymously) with positively identified Facebook photos, but also match pedestrians on a North American college campus with their online identities.

The repercussions of these studies go far beyond putting a name with a face; researchers Alessandro Acquisti, Ralph Gross, and Fred Stutzman anticipate that such technology represents a leap forward in the convergence of offline and online data and an advancement of the 'augmented reality' of complementary lives. With the use of publicly available Web 2.0 data, the researchers can potentially go from a snapshot to a Social Security number in a matter of minutes."

(Jared Keller, 29 September 2011, The Atlantic Magazine)

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TAGS

augmented realityCarnegie Mellon Universitycloud computing • college campus • convergencecross-context sharingdating • dating website • face perceptionface recognitionFacebook • Facebook photos • facial recognition services • facial recognition studies • Google Plusidentificationidentifyidentitymatchmobile app • offline data • online data • online dating • online identities • online identityonline profiles • PittPatt • portraitprofile image • profile photo • pseudonym • pseudonymously • publicly available • publicly available pictures • snapshotsocial networks • Social Security number • technology innovation • unidentified • visual identityWeb 2.0 • Web 2.0 data

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 MAY 2011

Flag of the United Tribes of New Zealand

"This flag was made on the Tory during its voyage from England to New Zealand in 1839 and raised at Petone on 30 September. The Tory carried New Zealand Company agents who intended to buy land from Maori. William Wakefield, the principal agent, referred to the flag as the 'colours of New Zealand' and the Tory gave it a twenty–one gun salute. It is possibly one of several used by the Company.

The flag's design was based on a flag adopted by a group of Maori chiefs at Waitangi in 1834 when New Zealand was an independent territory. The flag came to be known as the flag of the United Tribes of New Zealand, a term derived from an 1835 declaration of the country's independence by a group of northern chiefs.

The flag was the New Zealand Company's acknowledgement of the independent status of the country. After chiefs signed the Treaty of Waitangi with the British Crown in February 1840, the Union Jack was used as the national flag. When the Company continued to use the original New Zealand flag, Lieutenant–Governor William Hobson saw this as a challenge to the Crown's authority and dispatched an armed party to lower it on 30 June 1840. The next day the Union Jack was raised and British sovereignty proclaimed.

Despite the adoption of the Union Jack, the 1834 flag continues to have a special relevance to Maori and to the Treaty of Waitangi."

(Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa)

Fig.1 New Zealand Company flag, 1839, gift made to The Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa by Andrew Haggerty Richard Gillespie, 1967

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TAGS

1834 • 1835 • 1839 • 1840Aotearoa New Zealand • British Crown • British historycolonial history • colours of New Zealand • flag • independent status • independent territory • Maori • Maori chiefs • Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa • national flag • national identity • New Zealand Company • Petone • sovereigntysymbolTe Papa Tongarewa • Tory (ship) • Treaty of WaitangiUnion Flag • United Tribes of New Zealand • vexillologyvisual identityvoyage • Waitangi • William Hobson • William Wakefield

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 MAY 2011

inCulto's Eurovision 2006 entry nation branding Lithuania

Client: inCulto; Design, direction & animation: PetPunk; 3D Graphic: Romanas Zdanavičius

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TAGS

20063Danimationbrand identity • brand management for a country • countrycountry brandsdestination brand identitydestination brandingdestination imagedifferentiationdistinguishing features • Eurovision • Eurovision 2006 • experienceidentificationidentity • inCulto • individual identityLithuania • memorable experience • nation branding • PetPunk • place brandingplace promotionpublic relationsstrategic approachvisual identitywelcome

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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