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05 FEBRUARY 2016

The Nesta Digital Makers programme

"Digital technologies touch every aspect of life and business – but most people just use them and relatively few create them. We want to mobilise a generation of young people with the drive, confidence and know-how to understand how technology works and make their own new technology – whether websites, apps, hardware, games or innovations we haven't yet imagined."

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TAGS

21st century literaciesAutodeskBBC Make It DigitalBBC micro:bitcode clubdesign and technologydigital fabricationdigital literacies • digital makers • digital making • digital making club • digital making community • digital making event • digital making kit • digital making opportunities • digital making workshop • digital skillsdigital skills for the futuredigital technologiesengineering and designEric Schmidt • fundamental literacy • iRights • know-how • making and sharing • MozillaNESTANext Gen. report • Nominet Trust • Scottish Government • technology education • Technopop • tools for change • UK • understand how technology works • young people

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 JANUARY 2014

What industry say fusion skills really are?

Friday 31st January 2014 at the London Knowledge Lab: Presentations 1:30–2:30; Demos 2:30–3:30; Discussion and debate: 3:30–4:30.

"Digital media is now ubiquitous and embedded all around us even when we are not connected via our range of devices, so its no surprise that the government sees the creative industries as a priority area for growth. One factor key to its success is that of the so–called 'Fusion Skills': mixes of creative media, STEM and enterprise. The fusion of these three elements is an increasing demand from industry voices and seen as an answer to new digital innovation. In 2012, The Creative Industries Council (that reports to two ministers of state) called Fusion 'the new skills imperative' and one of eight challenges that need to be addressed in order to unlock growth. This 'what the research says' event attempts to unpack and explore Fusion in theory and practice, hearing from industry and educators. It's said that Higher Education faculty and discipline silos necessitate against fusion learning and teaching. ...

How do we co–opt students who are resistant to such abstract ideas, preferring outdated career caricatures from sources of variable quality? Where should interventions be– secondary school? Postgraduate? Is there hard evidence that Fusion skills are needed?"

(London Knowledge Lab)

TAGS

2014arts and humanities • career charicatures • computer sciencecreative economycreative industries • Creative Industries Council • creative media • creative problem solving skills • current thinking • digital mediadigital technology • disciplinary silos • embeddedenterpriseenterprise and creativity • Fusion Challenge • fusion skill • fusion skills • industry voices • interdisciplinary approacheslearning and teaching • Learning Innovation Education • LKL Innovations • LondonLondon Knowledge LabNESTA • new digital innovation • priority area for growth • Saint John Walker • silosSTEM subjects • the new skills imperative • theory and practice • TransFusion Conference • ubiquitousUK • unlock growth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 MAY 2013

Consultation to reclassify and measure the UK Creative Industries

"The purpose of this consultation is to update the DCMS Creative Industries classification and we are inviting input from interested parties. We have been engaging with industry and partner organisations over potential changes via a Technical Working Group of the Creative Industries Council and are now at a point where we would like to go out to consultation and seek wider views.

We have been working with partners (NESTA, Creative Skillset and Creative and Cultural Skills), to review and update the classification used in the DCMS Creative Industries Economic Estimates (CIEE). We intend to use this review 'Classifying and Measuring the Creative Industries', referenced below, as an objective starting point to suggest which occupations and industries should be included in the updated DCMS classification.

The review uses the idea of 'creative intensity' (the proportion of people doing creative jobs within each industry) to suggest which industries should be included. If the proportion of people doing creative jobs in a particular industry is substantial, above a 30% threshold, the industries are candidates for inclusion within the Creative Industries classification.

Similar to the outlook in our current Creative Industries Economic Estimates, the 'creative intensity' approach focuses on industries where the creative activity happens. The intention is to produce a classification which provides direct estimates of employment and the contribution to the economy, with no double counting – rather than attempting to capture all activity further down the value chain, for example, retail activities. The classification generated in this way can be used as a starting point for indirect estimates which include wider economic effects along the supply chain.

Any approach has data and methods constraints, which may affect some industries more than others. These limitations are reflected in the consultation and consultees are invited to suggest alternatives, supported by evidence–based argument. Weaknesses in the underlying classifications and data used to construct these estimates, which are identified by users, will be fed–back to the organisations which set these standards and provide these data so that we can influence longer–term improvements."

(Department for Culture, Media & Sport, 19 April 2013)

TAGS

2013 • CIEE • classificationclassification scheme • Classifying and Measuring the Creative Industries • contribution to the economy • creative activity • Creative and Cultural Skills • creative industries • Creative Industries classification • Creative Industries Economic Estimates • creative intensity • creative jobs • creative occupations • Creative Skillset • data constraints • DCMS • DCMS Creative Industries Economic Estimates • Department for Culture Media and Sport (DCMS) • economic effects • estimate • estimation • evidence-based argument • government consultation • longer-term improvements • measurement • methods constraints • NESTAproposals • proposed changes • public consultationreview • SOC • Standard Occupational Classification • supply chain • Technical Working Group of the Creative Industries Council • UKUK Governmentvalue chain

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 APRIL 2013

A Manifesto for the UK Creative Economy

"The UK's creative economy is one of its great national strengths, historically deeply rooted and accounting for around one–tenth of the whole economy. It provides jobs for 2.5 million people – more than in financial services, advanced manufacturing or construction – and in recent years, this creative workforce has grown four times faster than the workforce as a whole.

But behind this success lies much disruption and business uncertainty, associated with digital technologies. Previously profitable business models have been swept away, young companies from outside the UK have dominated new internet markets, and some UK creative businesses have struggled to compete.

UK policymakers too have failed to keep pace with developments in North America and parts of Asia. But it is not too late to refresh tired policies. This manifesto sets out our 10–point plan to bolster one of the UK's fastest growing sectors."

(Hasan Bakhshi, Ian Hargreaves and Juan Mateos–Garcia, April 2013, NESTA)

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2013 • advanced manufacturing • Asiabusiness models • business uncertainty • constructioncreative businessescreative economycreative industriescreative services innovation • creative workforce • digital technologiesdisruptive innovationeconomic growthentrepreneurshipfinancial services • Hasan Bakhshi • hi-tech start-up • Ian Hargreaves • innovation in the UKjobs • Juan Mateos-Garcia • knowledge-based economymanifestomentoringmentoring schemeNESTA • new business • new internet markets • North Americaopen innovationpolicy makerspublic services • Rachel Grant • social innovationtechnology innovationUKUK innovationventure capitalworkforce • young companies

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MARCH 2013

Prototyping in Public Services

"Prototyping in Public Services describes an approach that can be used to help develop new and innovative services by testing ideas out early in the development cycle.

NESTA has produced a guide for policymakers, strategy leads, heads of service, commissioners and anyone else in a public service looking for new methodologies that can help them to better meet the needs of their communities. It sits alongside the Prototyping Framework: A guide to prototyping new ideas which provides examples of activities that can happen at different stages of a prototyping project.

The guide and toolkit are early outputs from our prototyping work and are based on work NESTA and its partners have been doing with several local authorities and third sector organisations. We will continue to learn about prototyping as an approach that can be used to develop public services, through our practical programmes."

(NESTA, UK)

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commissioners • concept developmentconceptualisation • development cycle • guide • heads of service • local authorities • NESTA • new and innovative services • new ideas • new methodologies • policy makers • practical programmes • project developmentproject workprototyping • Prototyping in Public Services • prototyping project • public services • strategy leads • testing • testing ideas • third sector • third sector organisations • toolkitUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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