Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Popular Culture' keyword pg.1 of 6
24 AUGUST 2017

Everything Is Terrible: a celebration of 80s retro cheesiness

"Everything Is Terrible! is the internet sensation video collective responsible for some of this millennium's most intriguing and mind melting videos. From Yogi Ogi Dogi, the creepy yoga farmer, to Cat Massage to Pubic Hair Dying to the Yellow Dino who hunts pedophiles; for 7 years EIT! has mined the absurd VHS universe for the best/worst bits. Every video is original and fantastic media art that creates a window into America's hidden past and future!"

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80s televisionabsurdAmerican popular cultureaural treasurebad tastecheesyclipscollection of video clipscultural history • dredge up • earnestness • Everything Is Terrible • exercise videos • hidden past • infomercials • kitschmelangemovie clipnaivety • over-earnestness • popular culture • postmodern masterwork • PSAretroretro cheesiness • terrible footage • VHSvideo archivevideo collection • video collective • web video • workout videos

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 NOVEMBER 2015

The hipster as the postmodern dandy

"The hipster is, concurrently, developing into a form of youth subculture, though at present in a limited sense. Many of the tropes and defining characteristics of teenage tribalism are being draped in hipster attire, but with little of the angst-ridden and socio-economic preliminaries at the base of earlier subcultural trends and movements, such as skinheads, goths and punks (or some recipe based thereon). Without a solid, or at least only slightly shifting, base in materiality and social context, the attire of this set of genuinely disenfranchised youth is sign only; the woolly hat and the running shoe are talismans devoid of any intended meaning; the world seems flooded with signs without symbolism, with younger converts to the hipster 'style' aping their ape forebears. The sign has, in this context, lost its original referent and become 'hyperreal' (Baudrillard, 1994, p.1). The 'real' origin of the sign's meaning has been lost, or buried under meaningless affectation; the borrowing and commodification of a modern exoticism; that of various minority or 'retro' alternative fashions and attitudes. In reference to subcultural groups, Hebdige notes that 'humble' objects can be magically appropriated; 'stolen' by subordinate groups and made to carry 'secret' meanings' (1979, cited in Haralambos and Holborn, 2004, p.808). This explains the way punks could style safety pins into a new context, and teddy boys could subvert the traditional connotations of Edwardian formality – the coded meanings that charge such appropriated style-objects amounted to a kind of resistance to the ruling order, be that signified by the state or in the 'square' world of the mainstream. Each subculture is in some way 'spectacular', in that it creates a spectacle and intends to be noticed. The hipster is daily losing this status, as s/he becomes overloaded with signifiers (aesthetic surface) and has become divorced from the collective; there is no need for internal reinforcement against a subordinating external force when one has such a slippery class composition. The hipster is not oppressed, and purports to signify the pinnacle of individual choice and cultural savoir faire (though this position is problematized by the amoebic development of a youth subculture with roots in working class communities). The hipster's resistance is not to social subordination but to modernity itself, to a meaning-deficit brought on by a loosely defined, insecure mainstream culture that is less and less able to provide collective ontological sustenance. Perhaps the youth-hipster is an attempt to introduce a degree of collectivity in order to partially overcome alienation and inwardness, though this does not excuse the continued loss of substance and meaning in style and aesthetic value."

(Michael Reeve, 2013, Academia.edu)

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2013 • appropriated style-objects • boredomcommodificationcontagious assemblages • cultural bricolage • cultural codescultural resistance • cultural savoir faire • dandyism • Dick Hebdige • disaffected youth • disenfranchised youth • dressing up • Edwardian formality • facial hair • fashionable fad • hipster attire • hipster fashion • hipster girl • hipster style • hipster subculture • Holborn • identity performanceindividual choice • Jack Kerouac • Jean Baudrillardliminality rites • loss of meaning • loss of substance • Martin Holborn • meaningless affectation • Michael Haralambos • modern exoticism • plaid shirt • popular culturesocial contextsocial inventionsocial norms • social subordination • spectacular societystyle • subcultural groups • subcultural trends • talismanteddy boy • teenage tribalism • universe of regularised mutual responseurban clothing • urban fashion • youth subculture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 MARCH 2015

Richard Hamilton: British Pop Art Pioneer

"Hamilton was a member of the Independent Group, formed in the 1950s by a group of artists and writers at the Institute of Contemporary Arts, whose symposiums contributed to the development of Pop art in Britain. He was one of the prime practitioners of the critic Lawrence Alloway's theory of a 'fine/pop art continuum'. Hamilton interpreted this as meaning that 'all art is equal - there was no hierarchy of value. Elvis was to one side of a long line while Picasso was strung out on the other side ... TV is neither less nor more legitimate an influence than, for example, is New York Abstract Expressionism' (Hamilton, p.31)."

(Terry Riggs, December 1997, Tate)

Richard Hamilton (1956). 'Just what is it that makes today's homes so different, so appealing?'

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1950s19561960sAllen JonesAndy Warhol • Antony Donaldson • Brigitte Bardot • British artist • Clive Barker • Colin Self • collagecollage artDamien HirstDavid Hockney • Derek Boshier • Eduardo Paolozzi • effervescent • ephemera of popular culture • Frank Auerback • Galina Golikova • gaudy • Gerald Laing • influential creators • international art movement • James Rosenquist • Jan Howarth • Jann Haworth • Joe Tilson • Ken Russell • Lawrence Alloway • Leon Kossoff • low cost • Marcel Duchampmass audience • mass produced • Nicholas Monro • Patrick Caulfield • Pauline Boty • Peter Blake • Peter Philips • Peter Phillipspop art • pop art movement • popular art • popular culture • proto-pop art • rebellious artRene MagritteRichard Hamilton • Richard Smith • Robert Indiana • Ronald Brooks Kitaj • Roy Lichtenstein • short term solution • silkscreen • transient

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 DECEMBER 2014

The virtual is a liminal space that consists only of its becomingness-state

"One of the simplest ways to conceptualize the becomingness of liminal space in media is to think of the virtual. In his essay 'The Reality of the Virtual,' Slavoj Žižek addresses Gilles Deleuze's notion of the virtual as 'pure becoming without being,' which is ''always forthcoming an already past,'' but is never present or corporeal.[7] The virtual is a liminal space that consists only of its becomingness–state, and not an actual being or object to become. It exists as pure becoming that suspends both 'sequentiality and directionality'; it is a passage, but there is no line of passage.[8]"

(Allison Wright, The Chicago School of Media Theory)

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2004becoming • becoming without being • becomingness • beliefbelief systemsbeliefs • Ben Wright • democracydocumentary filmFather ChristmasGilles DeleuzeJacques Lacanliminalliminal spaceliminalitymedia theorypoliticspopular culture • post-political era • psychoanalysisSlavoj Zizek • Slovenian philosopher • sociology • universal truth • universalisingvideo lecturevirtual reality

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 DECEMBER 2014

Profanity Pop by José Rodolfo Loaiza Ontiveros

"These wonderfully warped depictions of Disney classics is brought to you by artist José Rodolfo Loaiza Ontiveros. His upcoming exhibition, 'Profanity Pop,' is described as a 'celebration of creative freedom in our time' –– creative freedom apparently translating to Snow White taking sexy selfies. There's something surprisingly unnerving about watching your childhood BFFs making out, doing drugs and taking pregnancy tests, no matter how much you thought you'd moved on from your Disney roots."

(Priscilla Frank, 01 August 2014, The Huffington Post)

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2014adult imageryart exhibition • Best Friends Forever (BFF) • botox • Botulinum toxin • candid shotcelebrity culture • contemporary situations • critical reinterpretation • crotch shot • culture jammingexhibitionismfairy tale charactersfan artHuffington Posticonic charactersillustration • imagined scenarios • irreverence • Jose Rodolfo Loaiza Ontiveros • La Luz de Jesus Gallery • Mexican artistmodern situationsnaughtypaparazziparodypop artpopular culturePrince Charming • Profanity Pop (2014) • reimaginingsselfie • sexy selfies • shipping (fandom)Snow Whitespectacular society • tabloid photo • tabloidisation • taco shot • unwholesomenessvanityWalt Disney • warped depictions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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