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Which clippings match 'Images' keyword pg.1 of 2
30 JUNE 2012

Internet Archaeology: graphic artefacts from our recent past

"Internet Archaeology seeks to explore, recover, archive and showcase the graphic artifacts found within earlier Internet Culture. Established in 2009, the chief purpose of Internet Archaeology is to preserve these artifacts and acknowledge their importance in understanding the beginnings and birth of an Internet Culture. We focus on graphic artifacts only, with the belief that images are most culturally revealing and immediate. Most of the files in our archive are in either JPG or GIF format and are categorized by either still or moving image, they are then arranged in various thematic subcategories. Currently, a major focus of Internet Archaeology is on the archiving and indexing of images found on Geocities websites, as their existence has been terminated by parent company Yahoo; who discontinued GeoCities operation on October 26, 2009. Internet Archaeology is an ongoing effort which puts preservation paramount. Unlike traditional archaeology, where physical artifacts are unearthed; Internet Archaeology's artifacts are digital, thus more temporal and transient. Yet we believe that these artifacts are no less important than say the cave paintings of Lascaux. They reveal the origins of a now ubiquitous Internet Culture; showing where we have been and how far we have come."

(Internet Archaeology)

Via Chelsea Nichols [http://ridiculouslyinteresting.wordpress.com/2011/11/26/internet–archaeology–the–best–of–90s–internet–graphics/]

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TAGS

1990s200920th century phenomenaaestheticsarchaeologyarchivearchiving • archiving and indexing • artefactcave paintingscultural codes • culturally revealing • cyber archaeologycyberculturedigital anthropologydigital artefactsdigital cultureemergence of the webGeocitiesGIF format • graphic artefacts • graphic artifacts • graphic designimagesindexindexingInternetinternet archaeologyinternet culture • JPG • JPG format • Lascauxnew mediaobsolescencepreservationrecent pasttransiencevisual designweb designweb pagesweb publishingYahoo!

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 APRIL 2012

BFI National Archive: Inview online

"Welcome to BFI InView. Here you will find over 2,000 non–fiction film and television titles from the 20th century to the early 21st. InView is easily searchable, comprehensively catalogued and clearly organised under six main Themes, each with an introductory essay by an academic historian."

(British Film Institute, 2009)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 APRIL 2012

BFI InView: Moving Images in the Public Sphere

"Today the BFI announces the completion of Phase One of a ground breaking project to give academics, teachers, students and researchers free online access to hundreds of hours of film and television. Available through the BFI National Archive these clips tell the complex social, economic and political history of Britain in the 20th century.

Funded by JISC as part of its digitisation programme, 'BFI InView: Moving Images in the Public Sphere' comprises more than 600 hours of full–length films and television programmes, alongside over 8,000 pages of related documents that have been digitised and made exclusively available to colleges and universities via a dedicated website. Accessible through federated access management, meaning users can view the materials with a single sign–on, the BFI InView site is easily searchable with materials catalogued and organised under six main categories: education, health, the environment, immigration, race and equality, industry and economy, law and order"

(BFI National Archive, 29 May 2009)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 MARCH 2011

Trove: repository of Australian cultural heritage

"Trove is a new discovery experience focused on Australia and Australians. It supplements what search engines provide. If you are researching in the fields of the social sciences, literature, local or family history, or need inspiration for your school assignment, then this is the tool for you.

For example if researching images relating to Edmund Barton, our first Prime Minister, results will include descriptions such as people, book, manuscript, map and newspaper articles. A researcher searching for information on Nellie Melba will be presented with a range of results including biographies, pictures, music, newspapers, books etc."

(The National Library of Australia)

Fig.1 Teenage Weekly Supplement (page 5) in Australian Womens Weekly 20 September 1961 [http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/imageservice/nla.news–page4830846/print]

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TAGS

archive • ARO • articlesAustralia • Australian Research Online • biographybookscataloguecategoryclassificationcollectioncontentcultural heritagedigital heritagefamily history • historic newspapers • images • journals • knowledge managementliteraturemagazinesmapsnational cultural heritage onlinenational heritagenational identityNational Library of Australianewspaperrepositoryresourceresourcessearch enginesocial historysocial sciencesTrove • Womens Weekly

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 JULY 2010

Defining visual thinking and visual literacy

"Wileman (1993) defines visual literacy as 'the ability to 'read,' interpret, and understand information presented in pictorial or graphic images' (p. 114). Associated with visual literacy is visual thinking, described as 'the ability to turn information of all types into pictures, graphics, or forms that help communicate the information' (Wileman, p. 114). A similar definition for visual literacy is 'the learned ability to interpret visual messages accurately and to create such messages' (Heinich, Molenda, Russell, & Smaldino, 1999, p. 64). The ERIC definition of visual literacy is 'a group of competencies that allows humans to discriminate and interpret the visible action, objects, and/or symbols, natural or constructed, that they encounter in the environment' (http://searcheric.org/). Robinson (as quoted in Sinatra, 1986) describes visual literacy as 'an organizing force in promoting understanding, retention, and recall of so many academic concepts with which students must contend' (p. v). And lastly, Sinatra defines visual literacy as 'the active reconstruction of past visual experience with incoming visual messages to obtain meaning' (p. 5), with the emphasis on the action by the learner to create recognition.

The use and interpretation of images is a specific language in the sense that images are used to communicate messages that must be decoded in order to have meaning (Branton, 1999; Emery & Flood, 1998). If visual literacy is regarded as a language, then there is a need to know how to communicate using this language, which includes being alert to visual messages and critically reading or viewing images as the language of the messages. Visual literacy, like language literacy, is culturally specific although there are universal symbols or visual images that are globally understood."

(Suzanne Stokes, 2002)

[1] The Occasional Wife

[2] Stokes, S. (2002). "Visual literacy in teaching and learning: A literature perspective." Electronic Journal for the Integration of Technology in Education 1(1).

Branton, B. (1999). Visual literacy literature review. Retrieved December 26, 2001, from http://vicu.utoronto.ca/staff/branton/litreview.html

Emery, L., & Flood, A. (1998). Visual literacy. Retrieved September 22, 1999, from University of Canberra, Australian Centre for Arts Education Web site: http://education.canberra.edu.au/centres/acae/literacy/litpapers/vislit.htm

Heinich, R., Molenda, M., Russell, J. D., & Smaldino, S. E. (1999). Instructional media and technologies for learning (6th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice–Hall.

Sinatra, R. (1986). Visual literacy connections to thinking, reading and writing. Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas.

Wileman, R. E. (1993). Visual communicating. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Educational Technology Publications.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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