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Which clippings match 'ACMI' keyword pg.1 of 1
08 DECEMBER 2014

Daniel Crooks: digital divisionism and image transposition

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ACMI • ACMI (Australian Centre for the Moving Image) • Anna Schwartz Gallery • Aotearoa New Zealand • Auckland Institute of Technology • Brothers Quay • chronophotography • computational imaging • Daniel Crooksdivisionism • Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco • flatbed scanner • hand-held scanner • Hastings • image stretchingJan Svankmajermotion studiesNew Zealand artistphotocopy • post camera imaging • scanningslit-scan • spatial distortion • tai chi • time as spacetime-motion studiestrain • transposition • Victorian College of the Artsvideo and digital artvideo artistvisual spectacleZbigniew Rybczynski

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 JANUARY 2011

Theory building through DNA visualisation

Drew "Berry's animations function as a tool for representing activities occurring within our bodies that could otherwise only be seen at a magnification of 100 million times. What distinguishes these works in the context of the moving image art form is the creation of a visual landscape that is extraordinary, strange and other–worldly, even though viewers are armed with the knowledge that they are scientifically exact. To follow the virtual camera through this strange world reminds them of the constant energetic presence of their own seething, pulsing, cellular functions. Watching these works, viewers become strangers in their own skin, inhabitants of a foreign landscape. Berry uses this synthesis of scientific and digital technology to create a holistic sense of the world beneath people's skin, sending a ripple across the viewers' bodies as they interact with the work, enlivened with the knowledge of their organic relation to the alien world on screen."

(Australian Centre for the Moving Image, Australia)

Fig.1 Drew Berry (2003). 'Body Code' 3D computer animation displayed as single–channel DVD projection; stereo audio. 8:34 mins; colour. Sound design: Franc Tétaz. Collection: Australian Centre for the Moving Image. Courtesy: Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research (WEHI) and the artist.

[These animations demonstrate the potential of design practice for revealing insight that might not otherwise be revealed. In this way preoccupations with visual fidelity and scientific accuracy must recognised as being only peripherally important.]

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2003ACMIanimationAustralia • Australian Centre for the Moving Image • body • Body Code • cellconceptualisationdatadesign practicedigital technologydiscoverydiscovery through designDNA • Drew Berry • extraordinaryfidelitygraphic representationillustrationinsightmagnificationrepresentation • scientific accuracy • scientific methodscientific visualisationskintheory buildingVictoria (Australia)visual depictionvisual fidelityvisual representationvisualisation • Walter and Eliza Hall Institute • WEHI

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 MAY 2005

Transacting Remotely: participating in Transmute's networked presence installation

I participated in the Transmute Collective's 'Intimate Transactions' work last week. The project allows two people to interact with each other remotely through a mediated interactive experience. For my session I 'transacted' with Keith Armstrong who was at ACMI (Australian Centre for the Moving Image) in Melbourne. As the two of us moved our feet on the project's 'Bodyshelf' our virtual avatar was able to move around the screen (projected simultaneously in Brisbane and Melbourne). In this way our avatars were able to 'collect' virtual 'assets' that we were able to share with each other through 'intimate transaction'.
(Simon Perkins)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MARCH 2005

Acmipark: Virtual ACMI Environment

acmi.net.au
acmipark is a virtual environment that contains a replication of the real world architecture of the Australian Centre for the Moving Image, Melbourne Australia. [...] Subterranean virtual caves hang below the surface, and a natural landscape replaces the Central Business District in which ACMI actually resides.acmipark [...] is not a game but it does however use game–engine technology and offers opportunities for play and exploration. Its intentions are to explore the possibilities of virtual place–making and the occupation of these radical new technological spaces

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ACMI • acmipark • AustraliaenvironmentMelbournevirtual
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