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04 MARCH 2014

Norman Kirk split-screen political ad for 1969 NZ general election

"This 1969 advertisement for the Labour Party emphasised the leadership qualities of Norman Kirk and sought to capitalise on a public mood for change as that turbulent decade drew to a close. It screened in full colour in cinemas and in black–and–white on television (colour TV wasn't introduced until 1973). Its striking split–screen imagery and pop–styled theme song were clearly aimed at younger voters, a potentially important audience in an election when the voting age was lowered from 21 to 20 (it would be reduced further, to 18, in 1974). It was not enough, however, to oust Keith Holyoake's National government, which had ruled for the previous nine years."

TAGS

1969advertisementAotearoa New Zealand • campaign advertising • cinematic techniqueColenso BBDO • dancing Cossacks (political TV ad) • film technique • general election • intra-frame • Keith Holyoake • Labour governmentLabour Party • mood for change • National (political party) • Norman Kirk • optical printing • political advertising • Prime MinisterRobert Muldoonsplit-screenThomas Crown Affair (1968) • turbulent decade • TV commercial

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 DECEMBER 2012

Theorizing Advertising and Promotion

"The visual rhetoric of ads is not, then, confined to the copy. An ad is an argument, a persuasive communication. Every part of it must support the main argument, must be persuasively suggestive. A press ad for Retinol Activ Pur face cream used a clever visual metaphor to support a claim that the cream reduced facial wrinkles. The ad featured two juxtaposed images of a beautiful (Caucasian) woman. She was wearing what seemed to be a white robe, folded over one shoulder like a Roman toga. In the background was a pure blue sky and a suggestion of white pillars, of the kind found in a Greek temple. One picture was cracked, like the surface of an old oil painting. The other was smooth. The metaphoric reference was clear: the cracks suggested wrinkles, but in an elegant way that was complimentary, not demeaning, to age. Old paintings are things of classical beauty, but the paint does tend to crack with age. The ad was designed to draw the eye across aesthetically appealing images while giving the reader heavy hints about the classic beauty they might aspire to if they were to consume the brand.

However the levels of meaning in advertisements are theorized. Acknowledging their presence lends a new dimension to the analysis of advertising as persuasive communication. It brings to light some of the subtlety and complexity of advertising design, while also allowing us to draw an intellectual connection between the various artificially differentiated categories of marketing communication."

(Chris Hackley, 2010)

Chris Hackley (2010). "Advertising and Promotion: An Integrated Marketing Communications Approach", Second Edition, SAGE Publications Ltd.

TAGS

2010adadsadvertisementadvertising and promotionadvertising design • aesthetically appealing images • artificially differentiated categories • beautifulblue sky • Caucasian woman • classic beauty • classical beauty • crack with age • demeaning • face cream • facial wrinkles • Greek temple • heavy hints • juxtaposed imageslevels of meaningmarketing communicationmetaphoric referenceoil painting • old paintings • persuasive communicationpersuasively suggestive • press ad • Retinol Activ Pur • Roman toga • visual metaphorvisual rhetoric • white pillars • white robe • wrinkles

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 NOVEMBER 2012

Dumb Ways to Die ad becomes surprise hit

"'Set fire to your hair, poke a stick at a grizzly bear ... Dumb ways to die ... dumb ways to die–ie–ie.' If the chorus isn't stuck in your head, it will be soon. Melbourne Metro Trains' darkly cute – and irksomely catchy – new ad for transport safety has gone viral, notching up a whopping 4.2 million YouTube views in less than a week. And nobody is more stunned by its success than the man behind the music, Sydneysider Ollie McGill. The Cat Empire keyboards player was commissioned to write the score to accompany lyrics to the McCann Group's new ad and has watched Facebook likes, Twitter shares and YouTube hits skyrocket as word of the animated video has spread like wildfire. ... In the ad, cartoon characters meet their ends in a number of colourful, sardonic ways, including a couple of nasty mishaps on train tracks, while the sweet chorus, 'dumb ways to die ... ' is instant earworm material."

(Daisy Dumas, 19 November 2012, Fairfax New Zealand Ltd.)

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TAGS

20122D animationadadvertisementanimated videoanimationAustraliabearblack humourcartooncartoon characters • catchy • character animationcomedydark comedy • darkly cute • deathdie • dumb • dumb ways to die • earworm • episodic structuregone viral • Horrible Histories • humouriTunesMcCann Groupmeet their endsMelbourne • Melbourne Metro Trains • mistakes to avoidmusic videonasty mishaps • Ollie McGill • parablepublic service announcementsafety • sardonic • songwriter • stupid deaths • The Cat Empire • traintrain station • train tracks • transport safety • Wahroonga

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 AUGUST 2012

Crete travel promotion to allay fears about the Greek financial crisis

"Crete Island, the cradle of European Civilization, and its friendly people wish you a nice staying! We promise that you will have an unforgettable Mediterranean travelling experience, whether you are visiting Crete for the first time or you are a regular visitor. This is the place where you can relax or discover the mountains, the sea, the towns and the countryside. Live the heartbeat of the Island from dawn to dusk. Discover your Crete!

Το Νησί μας και οι φιλόξενοι κάτοικοί του σας εύχονται καλή διαμονή στο λίκνο του Ευρωπαϊκού Πολιτισμού. Για σας που έρχεστε πρώτη φορά, για σας που μας επισκέπτεσθε τακτικά για ξεκούραση ή για να ανακαλύψετε τις αμέτρητες, φανερές και κρυμμένες ομορφιές της Κρήτης σε βουνά και θάλασσες, στις πόλεις και στην ύπαιθρο, υποσχόμαστε φιλόξενη και αξέχαστη, μεσογειακή διαμονή."

(Regional Unit of Crete, 2012)

Fig. "The island of Crete – See for yourself, Feel for yourself", Official tourism spot of Region of Crete. Created for the Greek island of Crete by Teo Papadoulakis.

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TAGS

2012advertisementadvertising images • Agios Nikolaos • allay fears • archaeological sitesAthensausterity measuresawareness raising • Chania • Crete • Crete Island • cultural heritage sitesdebt crisisEuropean Union • feel for yourself • financial crisis • friendly people • GreeceGreek financial crisis • Greek island of Crete • Heraclion • Heraklion • Ierapetra • Iraklion • island • island of Crete • Mediterranean • official tourism spot • online advertising • Region of Crete • Regional Unit of Crete • Rethymno • see for yourself • Sitia • Teo Papadoulakis • tourismtourism destinationtravel and leisuretravel promotion • travel trade • travelling experience • visitor • welcoming tourism • world heritage sites

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JULY 2012

The New Zealand Film Archive

"Established in 1981, the Film Archive is an independent charitable trust overseen by a Board of Trustees representing film, archival, Maori and community interests. The Film Archive's constitution and kaupapa express a commitment to collect, protect and connect New Zealand's film and television history.

When an item is in the care of the Archive, it is considered the property of the depositor. Subsequently the copyright for the material remains with the legal rights holders.

The collections of predominantly New Zealand film, video and television date from 1895 to the present day. Every genre of filmmaking – feature films, documentaries, short films, home movies, newsreels, television programmes and film and television advertisements – is represented. There is also a significant documentation collection which includes publicity materials, stills, posters, production records, props, costumes and equipment housed in Wellington.

As there is no statutory deposit legislation for film in New Zealand, material is deposited voluntarily – and without cost to the depositor. Maintaining a kaitiaki role over the collections the Film Archive's guardianship ensures ownership of the original item remains with the depositor and copyright is maintained by the appropriate parties. In the case of material with Maori content, the Film Archive actively maintains relationships with whanau/hapu/iwi to ensure appropriate long term care and access."

(New Zealand Film Archive)

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TAGS

18951981advertisementAotearoa New ZealandarchivalarchiveAustralasia • care and access • collectioncostumecultural heritagedocumentarydocumentationfeature film • film advertisement • film and television history • film archivefilm historyfilmmaking • guardianship • hapu • home movie • independent charitable trust • iwilegal rights holders • long term access • long term care • long term care and access • moving imageNew Zealand cinemaNew Zealand cultureNew Zealand Film ArchivenewsreelNZ Film Archive • production records • publicity materials • publicity posters • publicity stills • short filmtelevision advertisement • television history • television programmeWellington • whana

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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