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19 JUNE 2015

The benefits of Facebook 'Friends': the social capital implications of Facebook-enabled communication practices

Tuesday, 7 June 2011, 12:30 pm, Berkman Center, 23 Everett Street, second floor.

"This talk will provide an overview of research exploring the social capital implications of social network site use. Specifically, I will report on new research that attempts to identify specific Facebook-enabled behaviors that contribute to users' ability to access diverse perspective, novel information, and social support. This research explores the link between bridging social capital levels and Facebook-related factors such as time on site, the number of Facebook Friends, and a set of behaviors we call 'Cultivation of Social Resources.'"

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TAGS

2011 • absent ties • Berkman Center • Bernie Hogan • cultivation of social resources • Danah Boyd • diverse perspectives • Dmitri Williams • Erving GoffmanFacebook • Facebook friends • friendship networksinformation transmissioninformation-seeking behaviour • Internet effects • interpersonal ties • Michigan State University • multi-method investigation • multiple methods • NameGenWeb • Nicole Ellison • novel information • pseudo experimental techniques • quasi-experimental research • reciprocity • sample group • sample size • social affordances • social behavioursocial capital • social embeddedness • social media researchsocial networks • social support • social ties • status update • student sample • survey instrument • survey measures • technology affordancesUniversity of Michiganvideo lecture • weak ties

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 NOVEMBER 2010

The Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University

"The Berkman Center was founded to explore cyberspace, share in its study, and help pioneer its development. We represent a network of faculty, students, fellows, entrepreneurs, lawyers, and virtual architects working to identify and engage with the challenges and opportunities of cyberspace.

We investigate the real and possible boundaries in cyberspace between open and closed systems of code, of commerce, of governance, and of education, and the relationship of law to each. We do this through active rather than passive research, believing that the best way to understand cyberspace is to actually build out into it.

Our faculty, fellows, students, and affiliates engage with a wide spectrum of Net issues, including governance, privacy, intellectual property, antitrust, content control, and electronic commerce. Our diverse research interests cohere in a common understanding of the Internet as a social and political space where constraints upon inhabitants are determined not only through the traditional application of law, but, more subtly, through technical architecture ('code').

As part of our active research mission, we build, use, and freely share open software platforms for free online lectures and discussions. We also sponsor gatherings, ranging from informal lunches to international conferences, that bring together members of our diverse network of participants to swap insights – and sometimes barbs – as they stake out their respective visions for what the Net can become. We also teach, seeking out online and global opportunities, as well as supporting the traditional Harvard Law School curriculum, often in conjunction with other Harvard schools and MIT."

(Berkman Center for Internet & Society)

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TAGS

academic network • antitrust • applied researchBerkman Centerboundaries in cyberspace • closed systems • commercecommon understandingconceptualisation • content control • cyberspacediscoverydiscussionenquiryentrepreneurglobal opportunitiesgovernance • Harvard Law School • Harvard Universityinsightintellectual property • internet and society • internet as a social and political spacelaw • lawyers • MIT • Net issues • network of participants • online lectures • online opportunities • open systemsprivacyresearchresearch centre • share open software platforms • studentstechnical architecture • virtual architects

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 DECEMBER 2008

Clay Shirky on Social Media and Groups

"Clay brings the conversation about social media and its affect on our communications and group forming abilities through a series of easy to grasp examples. He looks at Sharing. Del.icio.us reverses the old order of sharing – we used to get together in groups and then share. Whereas tagging now allows us to share and then form groups. Look at Flickr where you can post your tagged images on an event then go find others who have also posted on it. The example is HDR photography on Flickr which originated from someone putting the first HDR image up and another person asked how to achieve it. Soon, around HDR the interest group formed. A community of practice. Then Conversation."
(Steven Clark)

[a useful discussion – if somewhat techno–utopian and teleological]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 NOVEMBER 2008

Danah Boyd on MyFriends, MySpace

"On June 19 [2008], danah boyd participated in the Berkman Luncheon Series to discuss her work and research in the area of social networks. She provided a great historical context to the various sites that have come and gone from the center of Internet activity, as well as some insight into what brought about their successes and failures.

Prior to her presentation she explained, 'Publics offer youth a space to engage in cultural identity development. By engaging in public life, youth learn to interpret the cultural signals that surround them and incorporate these cultural elements into their life. For a diverse array of reasons, contemporary youth have limited access to the types of publics with which most adults grew up. As a substitute for these inaccessible publics, networked publics like MySpace and Facebook are emerging to provide contemporary American youth with a necessary site for peer engagement.'"

(Berkman Center, 2007)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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