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Which clippings match 'Victorian Literature' keyword pg.1 of 1
10 AUGUST 2014

Patience, Satire, and Self-Righteousness

"Gilbert and Sullivan's fifth Savoy Opera, Patience (1881), is a shining example of the critical role of satire in popular culture, and a most important record of how many self–righteous upper middle class contemporaries viewed fringe schools of thought and pop culture during the dissipation of the Evangelical church. The operetta's premise is that Reginald Bunthorne and Archibald Grosvenor––characters reputedly based upon Oscar Wilde and Charles Swinburne respectively, although the actor who originally played Bunthorne drew on Whistler––are shams as bogus as the aesthetic movement that they embody."

(William R. Terpening, 1998, Victorian Web)

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TAGS

1881 • 19th centuryAesthetic Movementaestheticismaesthetics • Algernon Swinburne • Archibald Grosvenor • Arthur Sullivan • Charles Swinburne • chauvinismcolour • comic opera • critical commentarycultural critiqueDante Rossettidecadence • decadentismo • dissipation • electric lighting • Evangelical church • fringe • Gilbert and Sullivan • Harold Bloom • James McNeill Whistler • male vanity • musical theatreopera • Opera Comique • operetta • Oscar WildePatience (1881) • pop culture • popular cultureProtestantism • Reginald Bunthorne • satire • Savoy Opera • Savoy Theatre • Savoyards • schools of thought • self-righteous • self-righteousness • theatrical production • upper middle class • vanityVictorian literature • William Gilbert

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 MARCH 2005

Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions

"Imagine a vast sheet of paper on which straight Lines, Triangles, Squares, Pentagons, Hexagons, and other figures, instead of remaining fixed in their places, move freely about, on or in the surface, but without the power of rising above or sinking below it, very much like shadows – only hard and with luminous edges – and you will then have a pretty correct notion of my country and countrymen. Alas, a few years ago, I should have said 'my universe': but now my mind has been opened to higher views of things..."

(A Square [Edwin A. Abbott])

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