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Which clippings match 'Pong' keyword pg.1 of 2
07 DECEMBER 2014

ActiWait: gamifying a pedestrian crossing with interactive pong game

ActiWait "makes waiting at the crosswalk for the signal to change more fun. The game is played while the light is red for the waiting pedestrians: a touch screen is mounted on two signal posts opposite one another. It is operated with your finger. Modeled after 'Pong', the computer game that has long since become a classic, there are two bars on the display, with which–moved with your finger –a ball can be batted back and forth. You get a point for every time your opponent misses the ball. In other words, this is a classic game with a new look and, perhaps most surprising, in a very different environment. Another charming part of the game: the opponents meet completely spontaneously and randomly, without knowing each other.

The idea for the project was first visualized in 2012 in a short video clip, in which the situation was simulated to look very life–like. In actual fact, the video presentation was a perfectly crafted synthesis of animation and real images. The simulation was developed on the computer and projected onto the traffic–signal buttons filmed with a green screen."

(HAWK Press Office)

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2012 • ActiWait • Christiane Dienel • computer gamecrosswalkdesign prototypedesign student projectdesigning experiencesgamificationGermany • HAWK Hildesheim • HAWK Hochschule fur angewandte Wissenschaft und Kunst • Hildesheim • Holger Michel • Ingo Meyer • interaction designMasters studentspedestrian crossingplayPongproduct designpublic spacepublic space use • Stefan Woelwer • StreetPong (prototype) • traffic intersectiontraffic light • traffic light button • traffic signal • University of Applied Sciences and Arts • urban infrastructure • urban interaction • user interactions • wireless connection

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 NOVEMBER 2014

Body Navigation: austere ambience of projection-dance work

"Two dancers and their digital reproduction are the scenographic frame of this humorous and emotional portrait of human relations. Based on rules and structured in a game like manner, the installation makes way for a playful dialog between the man, woman and the digital 'footprints' they leave behind.

The Body Navigation performance was originally part of a larger installation and modern dance performance in Copenhagen, by Tim Rushton, Danish Dance Theatre called Labyrint.

We used processing for the infrared blobtracking of the dancers and drawing the open gl graphics. During the performance Tina controlled the whole thing live from an Isadora–based interface via osc."

Body Navigation: dance installation and choreography for Labyrint at Kaleidoskop K2, Copenhagen 2008. Video artist: Ole Kristensen and Jonas Jongejan; choreography: Tina Tarpgaard; dancers: Hilary Briggs, Luca Marazia, Nelson R. R. Smith and Laura Lohi; produced by: Danish Dance Theatre.

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2008 • Athelas Sinfonietta • austere ambience • austere environment • black and white • body movement • Body Navigation (2008) • boundary functionschoreographyCopenhagendance performance • Danish Dance Theatre • digital footprints • digital reproduction • doppelgangerfloor • footprints • geometry • Gyorgy Ligeti • Hilary Briggs • human re­lations • infrared camera • infrared tracking • interactive projectioninteractive videoIsadora • Jonas Jongejan • Kaleidoskop K2 • Laura Lohi • Luca Marazia • Mathias Friis-Hansen • movement performance • Nelson Smith • Ole Kristensen • Open Sound Control (OSC) • palimpsestpartition of spacepatterns of movementperformance • play­ful dialogue • playful workPongprojected from overhead • Recoil Performance Group • scenograph­ic frame • software artspatial mapping • Tina Tarpgaard • tracingtrajectoryvideo projectionvoronoi

CONTRIBUTOR

Anna Troisi
19 JUNE 2014

How do we create things together in a shared environment?

"When critical thinking is at its strongest, it often comes from exactly the sort of fluidity of practice that does run through Digital Revolution. The London–based architect and artist Usman Haque has been creating innovative software products alongside interactive artworks for more than 15 years. In 2007, he founded Pachube, a global data–sharing network that anticipated by years the current buzz around big data and the internet of things. In 2011, Pachube enabled hundreds of Japanese civilians to quickly and easily share weather and radiation data in the aftermath of the Fukushima disaster, boosting monitoring and relief efforts. Haque's Umbrellium team has produced a new artwork for Digital Revolution, which takes up the entirety of The Pit, the Barbican's subterranean theatre space. Called Assemblance, the piece allows about 25 people at a time to physically shape beams of light with their hands, pushing and pulling them around the space–while also bumping into and potentially messing up the shapes created by other people.

Haque calls it 'a virtual reality', but not in the sense of a purely digital realm: 'It's there, it's responding to you, you can see it, but as you try and approach it you can't actually feel it. For me, the idea is to question this distinction between the physical and the virtual.' The process is akin to building a sandcastle on the beach, where you are building a structure that anyone else, or the elements, can destroy in a moment.

Assemblance attempts to answer the question: 'How do we create things together in a shared environment, where we can't always trust each other, but we need to act together regardless?' This, indeed, is the situation we find ourselves in now. In the modern digital world, the question of participation is crucial as our various networks–social, media, national–require us to constantly mediate between acting as individuals and acting as a group. For Haque, the digital has given us 'the capacity to have an effect on the other side of the world almost instantaneously', from news events and economic flows to disaster response and warfare. 'We can do things to other people in distant lands, and so the question of our responsibility, and our culpability, is thrown up in ways that it hasn't been before. On the other hand, we now have the capacity to connect with each other, and develop new ways to work together, rather than against each other.'

Assemblance asks the audience to see itself as part of a networked whole, where actions have consequences. It also points towards the fact that 'the digital' is not a medium, but a context, in which new social, political and artistic forms arise. After 50 years, at least, of digital practice, institutions are still trying to work out its relevance, and how to display and communicate it–a marker, perhaps, that it is indeed a form of art."

(James Bridle, 18 June 2014, The Guardian)

Fig.1 Assemblance, a 3D interactive light field by Usman Haque and Dot Samsen from Umbrellium. Photograph: Umbrellium.

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2014 • act together • acting as a group • actions have consequencesartwork • Assemblance (artwork) • Barbican Centre • beam of light • big data • capacity to connect • collaborative action • collective culpability • collective responsibility • creating things together • data sharing • data-sharing network • digital artdigital art exhibitiondigital art form • digital context • digital practicedigital revolutionDigital Revolution (2014) • Dot Samsen • economic flowsflowsFukushimaGoogle DevArtimmersive experienceimmersive worksindividual and collective activities • innovative software • interactive artworks • interactive light fieldinternet of thingslightlight artlight installationlight sculpturemediated interactionmediated reality • modern digital world • new ways of working together • Pachube • part of a networked whole • participationphysical and digital interactionPongresponsive light installation • sandcastle • shared environment • trustUmbrellium • Usman Haque

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 AUGUST 2012

PIXELS: invasion of New York by 8-bit video game pixels

New York invasion by 8–bits creatures ! PIXELS is Patrick Jean' latest short film, shot on location in New York. Written, directed by : Patrick Jean Director of Photograhy : Matias Boucard SFX by Patrick Jean and guests Produced by One More Production www.onemoreprod.com

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8-bit • 8-bits creatures • animationAtari • Brooklyn Bridge • cloudCommodorecreaturecultural literacy • cultural reference • digital culture • Donkey Kong • formal conceit • Frogger • invasionKing Kong • Matias Boucard • New York • NYC Subway • One More Production (agency) • Pac-Manparodypastiche • Patrick Jean • pixelpixelartpixelationpixellation • PIXELS (film) • Pongself-referentialSFXshort filmSpace InvadersTetrisvideo gamevideogamesvisual conventionsvisual vernacular

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
31 MAY 2011

Adam Curtis: the network ecology myth

"The new series, called All Watched Over By Machines Of Loving Grace, takes complicated ideas and turns them into entertainment by the use of the vertigo–inducing intellectual leaps, choppy archive material and disorienting music with which all Curtis fans are familiar. The central idea leads Curtis on a journey, taking in the chilling über–individualist novelist Ayn Rand, former chairman of the Federal Reserve Alan Greenspan, the 'new economy', hippy communes, Silicon Valley, ecology, Richard Dawkins, the wars in Congo, the lonely suicide in a London squat of the mathematical genius who invented the selfish gene theory, and the computer model of the eating habits of the pronghorn antelope.

You can see why Zoe Williams once wrote that, while watching one of Curtis's programmes, 'I kept thinking the dog was sitting on the remote. ...'

Now he has moved on to machines, but it starts with nature. 'In the 1960s, an idea penetrated deep into the public imagination that nature is a self–regulating ecosystem, there is a natural order,' Curtis says. 'The trouble is, it's not true–as many ecologists have shown, nature is never stable, it's always changing. But the idea took root and spread wider–people started to believe there is an underlying order to the entire world, to how society is structured. Everything became part of a system, like a computer; no more hierarchies, freedom for all, no class, no nation states.' What the series shows is how this idea spread into the heart of the modern world, from internet utopianism and dreams of democracy without leaders to visions of a new kind of stable global capitalism run by computers. But we have paid a price for this: without realising it we, and our leaders, have given up the old progressive dreams of changing the world and instead become like managers–seeing ourselves as components in a system, and believing our duty is to help that system balance itself. Indeed, Curtis says, 'The underlying aim of the series is to make people aware that this has happened–and to try to recapture the optimistic potential of politics to change the world.'

The counterculture of the 1960s, the Californian hippies, took up the idea of the network society because they were disillusioned with politics and believed this alternative way of ordering the world was based on some natural order. So they formed communes that were non–hierarchical and self–regulating, disdaining politics and rejecting alliances. (Many of these hippy dropouts later took these ideas mainstream: they became the Silicon Valley entrepreneurs who decided that computers could liberate everyone and save the world.)...

He draws a parallel with those 1970s communes. 'The experiments with them all failed, and quickly. What tore them apart was the very thing that was supposed to have been banished: power. Some people were more free than others – strong personalities dominated the weak, but the rules didn't allow any organised opposition to the suppression because that would be politics.' As in the commune, so in the world: 'These are the limitations of the self–organising system: it cannot deal with politics and power. And now we're all disillusioned with politics, and this machine–organising principle has risen up to be the ideology of our age.'"

(Katharine Viner, 6 May 2011, Guardian)

Episode 1: 'All Watched Over By Machines Of Loving Grace: Love and Power', First broadcast BBC Two, 9:00PM Mon, 23 May 2011
Episode 2: 'All Watched Over By Machines Of Loving Grace: The Use and Abuse of Vegetational Concepts', First broadcast BBC Two, 9:00PM Mon, 30 May 2011
Episode 3: 'All Watched Over By Machines Of Loving Grace: The Monkey In The Machine and the Machine in the Monkey', First broadcast BBC Two, 9:00PM Mon, 06 June 2011

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1960s1970sabstract modelabstractionAdam Curtis • Alan Greenspan • All Watched Over By Machines Of Loving Grace • archive footageAyn RandBBC2Bill MurrayblogsCarmen Hermosillochange • commune • computer model • computer utopianism • confessional memoirs • control societyconvergencecounterculturecultural expressioncyberspacedemocracydigital cultureecologyemotions become commodified • Esther Rantzen • evolution • expressions of power • Facebookfreedom • Georgia • global capitalism • hierarchical structures • hierarchies • hierarchy • hippy communes • hippy dropouts • hyper-consumerismideologyideology of the timeindividualisminternet utopianism • Kyrgyzstan • Loren Carpenter • machines • Mayfair Set • mercantilist economy • modern world • natural order • network ecologynetworked societynetworksnon-hierarchical • non-hierarchical societies • orderingPongpopular culture • punchdrunk • reflexive modernisationRichard Dawkinsscientific ideasself-organising systemself-regulating • self-regulating ecosystem • selfish gene theory • Silicon Valleysocial experimentssocial mediasocialist realismsociety • Soviet realism • stability • stable order • Stakhanovites • structuresystems theorytechnology convergencetelevision documentary • TUC • TwitterUkraineunderlying orderunstable • Westminster • White House • Zoe Williams

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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