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Which clippings match 'Idealism' keyword pg.1 of 3
05 OCTOBER 2014

Speculative Everything: Design, Fiction, and Social Dreaming

"Today designers often focus on making technology easy to use, sexy, and consumable. In Speculative Everything, Anthony Dunne and Fiona Raby propose a kind of design that is used as a tool to create not only things but ideas. For them, design is a means of speculating about how things could be–to imagine possible futures. This is not the usual sort of predicting or forecasting, spotting trends and extrapolating; these kinds of predictions have been proven wrong, again and again. Instead, Dunne and Raby pose 'what if' questions that are intended to open debate and discussion about the kind of future people want (and do not want).

Speculative Everything offers a tour through an emerging cultural landscape of design ideas, ideals, and approaches. Dunne and Raby cite examples from their own design and teaching and from other projects from fine art, design, architecture, cinema, and photography. They also draw on futurology, political theory, the philosophy of technology, and literary fiction. They show us, for example, ideas for a solar kitchen restaurant; a flypaper robotic clock; a menstruation machine; a cloud–seeding truck; a phantom–limb sensation recorder; and devices for food foraging that use the tools of synthetic biology. Dunne and Raby contend that if we speculate more–about everything–reality will become more malleable. The ideas freed by speculative design increase the odds of achieving desirable futures."

(Anthony Dunne and Fiona Raby, 2013)

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2013alternative visionsAnthony Dunne • Belgrade • Belgrade New Media Festival • Charles Avery • conceptual designdesign approachesdesign idealsdesign ideasDesign Interactions (MA) • desirable futures • emerging cultural landscape • extrapolating • Fiona Raby • Frederik Pohl • future contextsfuture forecastingfuturology • how things could be • ictional scenarios • idealism • ideas freed by speculative design • interaction design • literary fiction • Michio Kaku • modelling possible realities • new media festival • open debate and discussion • philosophy of technologyPhysics of the Impossible (2008)political theory • possible futures • potential futures • predictions • Resonate festival • Royal College of Art • scenario building • sci-fiscience fiction • social dreaming • speculative design • Speculative Everything Design (2013) • speculative fictionsuspend disbelief • the future people want • Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance • we speculate • what if

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 JULY 2014

The Fountainhead: a testament to uncompromising individualism

"The work of Rand, most of it published between the 1940s and 1960s, was very popular in the United States and gained a large and still active following. Rand developed her own school of philosophy called Objectivism, that centers on the principle of selfishness. In her novels and philosophical works, Rand advocates a form of rational and ethical egoism, and a political order based on laissezfaire capitalism. Her two novels, Fountainhead (1943) and Atlas Shrugged (1957) are lengthy portrayals of strong individuals who heroically and steadfastly pursue their lives according to Rand's philosophical principles."

(P.W. Zuidhof, p.84, 2012)

Zuidhof, P. W. (2012). "Ayn Rand: Fountainhead of neoliberalism?" Krisis: Journal for contemporary philosophy(1).

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19431949American dreamarchitect • artistic vision • Atlas ShruggedAyn Rand • battle of wills • challenging conventionscollectivismcompromiseconventionalitycreative geniusdesign commissioningdesign conventions • Edward Carrere • egoegoism • ethical egoism • fear of failure • form and function • form follows function • Frank Lloyd Wrightfree willfunctionalism • Gary Cooper • Howard Roark • human actionidealism • independent-mindedness • individualism • integrity • International Styleisolated sort of geniuslaissez faire capitalismLe CorbusierLudwig Mies van der Rohemelodramamodernist architecturemodernist idealsmoral purposeneoliberalismnewspaper tycoonnon-conformistobjectivismoptimistic idealPatricia Neal • personal integrity • personal visionpowerquestioning traditionsradical architecture • rational egoism • rational self-interest • rise to power • romantic notion of the artist • rousing speech • self-interestselfishnessskyscraper • smear campaign • struggle in obscurity • The Fountainhead • uncompromising integrity • uncompromising vision • weak-mindedness • William Kueh

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 AUGUST 2012

La Vie En Rose (kiwi short film)

Fig.1 Anna Reeves (1994), "La Vie En Rose" (short film excerpt) Aotearoa New Zealand, 16mm 7 minutes.

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16mm1994 • Alex Cole-Baker • Anna Reeves • Aotearoa New ZealandAustralasia • catholic priest • cautionary taleidealism • Katie Wolfe • kiwi shortkiwi short filmskiwi shorts • La Vie En Rose (short film) • naivetynz short filmromance • rose (plant) • rose-coloured glasses • rose-tinted glasses • short film • slug • The Coming of Age of The New Zealand Short Film • Timothy Balme • Victoria Kelly

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 JUNE 2012

The Florida Project: Disneyland's fore-project

"During the planning and construction of Disneyland, Walt had been introduced to the basic concepts of urban design and slowly became a self–taught expert in the field. Such seemingly dry concepts as city planning and urban decay fired his imagination. When Disney's Chief Archivist Dave Smith catalogued Walt's office in 1970, one of the books on a shelf behind Walt's desk was architect Victor Gruen's The Heart of Our Cities: The Urban Crisis, Diagnosis and Cure.

'Walt was serious about that city,' Marty [Sklar] explains. 'And he had a lot of work being done at the time' to explore its viability. Walt asked for Marty's help to coalesce his thoughts so he could produce a film to explain the project, and, over the next several months, Marty wrote a script for a 24–minute film that detailed the 'Florida Project.' In the film, an ebullient Walt explains the concept of Epcot – a full–scale city of the future where people would live, work, and play in comfort. An international shopping district would re–create scenes from around the world, and American industry would have a showcase for the latest technologies.

Walt shot the short film in October 1966. Eight weeks later, he was gone.

The brief–but–potent film, however, lived on. It was shown a handful of times in early 1967 to key constituencies: the Florida Legislature, invited guests (for a packed presentation in a Winter Park theater), and once on statewide television. The film proved vital in convincing both the Legislature and voters that Disney's Florida Project should be approved, which it was. From the moment the project was given the go–ahead, Marty says, the Company's resources were dedicated to getting Walt Disney World up and running and to regaining confidence in the absence of its founder and leader."

(John Singh and Steven Vagnini, 07 June 2012)

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1964 • 1964 New York Worlds Fair • 1966amusement parkanniversaryarchitectural conjecture • astuter computer • city • city planning • concept artwork • Disney World ProjectDisneylandEPCOTEPCOT Center • Epcot music • Epcot on Film • Epcot tunes • evolving city • Experimental Prototype Community of TomorrowFloridafuturistfuturisticfuturistic designgeodesic • geodesic sphere • idealismimagineering • Marty Sklar • never made it off the drawing board • noveltypavilionRay Bradbury • smellitzer • technological innovationtechnological utopianism • technology showcase • theme parkurban designurban planning • Victor Gruen • Walt DisneyWalt Disney CompanyWalt Disney WorldWalt Disney World Resort

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 NOVEMBER 2011

Jonathan Meades: Reading Stowe Gardens

"Stowe Park, a story filled with stories, is, says Meades, 'an anthology of boasts.' Take, for example, the temples of Ancient Virtues, British Worthies and Modern Virtues. Set in the Elysian Fields, reflected in the waters of the River Styx, they are Cobham's version of the good, the great and the downright bad: old heroes in the first, modern heroes in the second and everything that is rubbish about eighteenth century today signifed by the ruins of the third, and by a headless statue of none other than his arch enemy, Walpole. It is a big old Whig boast, and hilariously obvious. Obvious, that is, if you're a member of the Kit Cat Club , or someone with enough of a reading in the classics, in British history, in Cobhams Machiovelian shenanigons. Otherwise, like most of us, you'll be needing that there guide book."

(26 October 2011, FreeState)

Abroad Again: Season 1, Episode 5, Stowe: Reading a Garden (6 June 2007) [http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1180365/].

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18th century2007 • architectural folly • aristocracyboasting • classical ideals • classical virtues • decorationdesign formalism • enclosed world • English garden • English landscape garden • English landscape movement • English landscape park • Enlightenment landscapes • European Enlightenment • follies • formal design • gardengarden design • garden follies • garden ornaments • gardening style • ha-ha • ha-ha wall • historical era • historical recreationidealismidyl • idyllic pastoral landscape • James Gibbs • Jardin anglais • John Soane • John Vanbrugh • Jonathan Meades • landscape architect • landscape architecture • landscape garden • ornamental design • pastoral landscape • picturesque • picturesque architecture • planting • reading a garden • Reading A Garden (2007) • Robert Adam • Robert Payton • Stowe Gardens • Stowe House • Stowe School • sublimesymmetrical patterntelevision documentarytheme parkUKview of naturevisual symbolism • Whigs • William Kent

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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