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Which clippings match 'Mirror World' keyword pg.1 of 1
01 NOVEMBER 2014

Mirrored story lines used for Honda The Other Side promotion

Honda's "The Other Side aims to bring to life these two sides of Honda by putting fans at the heart of a high–adrenaline dual narrative. The story unfolds in two parallel tales, one set during the day and the other at night. The daytime story sees a father picking his daughter up from school in his white Civic and driving her to a surprise party.

By contrast the night–time narrative shows the father's other side – an undercover cop driving a crew of art thieves to a police sting, in a head–turning red Type R. While very different in tone, the two stories mirror each other perfectly in their composition. ...

A press of the 'R' key puts the director's cut into the viewers' hands, allowing them to switch in real time between two mirrored story lines. Through sound design and seamlessly matched scenes, you can't help but feel the power of Honda's other side. ..."

(Wieden+Kennedy London, 30 October 2014)













2014alter ego • Bobby Krlic • car adcar chasechase scene • contrasting perspectives • Daniel Wolfe • daytime • driving • dual narratives • Honda Civic • Honda Civic Type RHonda Civic Type Rinteractive advertisinginteractive video • Jean-Philippe Ricci • mirror world • mirrored story lines • Mourad Frarema • night and day • night-time • other side • parallel narratives • parallel stories • put your foot down • Robbie Ryan • scene jumping • scene matching • Slimane Dazi • Stinkdigital Scott Dungate • switching between • time jump • time of day • toggling between • Wieden+Kennedy London • YouTube • YouTube interactivity


Simon Perkins
22 JULY 2014

The Arcades Project: a world of secret affinities

"the entire Arcades complex (without definitive title, to be sure) remained in the form of several hundred notes and reflections of varying length, which Benjamin revised and grouped in sheafs, or 'convolutes;' according to a host of topics. Additionally, from the late Twenties on, it would appear, citations were incorporated into these materials–passages drawn mainly from an array of nineteenth–century sources, but also from the works of key contemporaries (Marcel Proust, Paul Valery, Louis Aragon, Andre Breton, Georg Sinunel, Ernst Bloch, Siegfried Kracauer, Theodor Adorno). These proliferating individual passages, extracted from their original context like collectibles, were eventually set up to communicate among themselves, often in a rather subterranean manner. The organized masses of historical objects–the particular items of Benjamin's display (drafts and excerpts)–together give rise to 'a world of secret affinities;' and each separate article in the collection, each entry, was to constitute a 'magic encyclopedia' of the epoch from which it derived. An image of that epoch. In the background of this theory of the historical image, constituent of a historical 'mirror world;' stands the idea of the monad–an idea given its most comprehensive formulation in the pages on origin in the prologue to Benjamin's book on German tragic drama, Ursprung des deutschen Trauerspiels (Origin of the German Trauerspiel)–and back of this the doctrine of the reflective medium, in its significance for the object, as expounded in Benjamin's 1919 dissertation, 'Der Begriff der Kunstkritik in der deutschen Romantik' (The Concept of Criticism in German Romanticism). At bottom, a canon of (nonsensuous) similitude rules the conception of the Arcades."

(Howard Eiland and Kevin McLaughlin, p.x)

Benjamin, Walter (2002). "Das Passagen–werk [The Arcades Project]", US: Harvard University Press. 0674008022
Fig.1 Edizioni Brogi (circa 1880). No.4608 "Ottagono della Galleria Vittorio Emanuele", Milano.



193519th century • a world in miniature • a world of secret affinities • affinityAndre Bretonarcadescitationcollectibles • convolutes • department stores • documentary synopsis • encyclopaedia • epoch • Ernst Bloch • expose • Georg Sinunel • historical image • historical objects • Institute of Social Research • Louis Aragon • magic encyclopaedia • Marcel Proustmirror worldmonad • monadology • nostalgic tributenostalgic yearningnotes • original context • Parispassages couvertsPaul Valery • reflections • sheafs • Siegfried Kracauer • similitudeThe Arcades ProjectTheodor Adorno • topics • Walter Benjamin


Simon Perkins
03 DECEMBER 2003

Patterns of Hypertext: complex webs of links

"The complexity and unruliness of the complex webs of links we create has frequently led to calls for "structured" or otherwise disciplined hypertext [33][20][75]. While calls for clearer structure have tried to avoid, consolidate, or minimise links, it is now clear that hypertext cannot easily turn its back on complex link structures. Where it was once feared that the cognitive burdens of large, irregular link networks would overwhelm readers, we find in practice that myriad casual readers flock to the docuverse. The growth of literary and scholarly hypertext, the evolution of the Web, and the economics of link exchange all assure the long–term importance of links."
(Mark Bernstein, Eastgate Systems, Inc.)

[33]. Robert J. Glushko, Design Issues for Multi–Document Hypertexts, in Hypertext'89. 1989, Pittsburgh. p. 51–60.
[20]. L. DeYoung, Linking Considered Harmful, in ECHT'90 – Hypertext: Concepts, Systems and Applications, S. Rizk, Andre. 1990, Cambridge Univ. Press: p. 238–249.
[75]. K. Utting and Nicole Yankelovich, "Context and orientation in hypermedia networks", ACM Transactions on Office Information Systems, 1989. 7(1): p. 58–84.



raided narrative • branching narrativecausally related narrative eventscontour • counterpoint • cycle • docuverse • douglas cycle • feint • hypertextJames JoycejoinJoycean hypertext • joyces cycle • link • Mark Bernstein • mirror world • missing link • montage • moulthrops move • navigational feint • neighbourhoodorderpattern • Rashomon • sieve • splitstory shape • Storyspace • structure • tangle • web • web ring

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